Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on April 27, 1950 · Page 7
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Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 7

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Alton, Illinois
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Thursday, April 27, 1950
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Page 7
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;pAag install Water at East Alton School Lay Footing for Junior | High Building £AST ALTON. — Installation of i T»water main occurred today to complete the Job of bringing wnter to the site of the new junior high school Building beyond Whilclaw street, at Third. Charles T. Gabbed, superintendent, announced fooling for ihe building IS in and thnl the workmen are presently engaged In placing forms for the foundation. Gab- beH. stated the concrete for the pump house was poured Insl week. In connection with the local rancor drive, Gabbert stated SG9.M xvas collected 6t Blair School. Broken down, (lie report shows $41 wns contributed by the faculty s and other employes and $28.30 by pupils. East Alton Pupils To See Ball Game ALTON SVttWIMO ffitBORAPM f«U»SDA¥, APSfL 2?, 19S8 Wood River Twp, Scouters Elect Mrs, Arthur Houser New Club Chairman EAST ALTON. — The following pupils were,chosen at an election In each home room of the Junior High School to be guests of the i Wood River-Hartford Rotary Club ; jtt a ball game In St. Louis, May ',' Rodger Smith, Brooks JuhlJn, i ftbbert Gerard, Leonard O'Neal. ! Nancy Keller, Betty Huffman, Pal', «y Hellemeyer and Delia Jo Wills * of the seventh grade and Dohald Barnes, .Ronald Benchum, Jack & bugger, Spencer Smith, Betty An- f,;derson, Sandra Coppage, Bonnie ^Cunningham, andVelvn Rldenhour, 0 eighth grade. |- The boys and girls will be picked f up the evening of May 12 and 1 taken to the ball game, whjre-they. |. will have reserved seats. § Later, an assembly will be hold |la|; Blair Sphool lp award honors to m these 'outstanding school citizens. M Attend Spring Rally | EAST ALTON •— Mrs.. .Floyd I Blalne,,'Mr».' 'iMauHce.Coleiasure, ;§ Mrs. A. &. Jonos, Mrs. Orvll Ogles* by, Mri. Stanley' Stepson, Mrs. H. '/JO. Clausen, Mrs. Alvtn Cannody, |SMrs. Henry Lawrence,;-iMLrs Ralph I Parker, Mrs. Frank Good^nan, and | : Mrs. Ruth Eyers, all members of i the Mlssldnary Society of' the First fe, Baptist Church, attended the f, spring rally at Belleville, Tuesday. § The Regular monthly meeting of I* the Society win bo this evening at JS7:30 at the home of Mrs. Stanley |. Stepson, 104 North Wood River H avenue, with Mrs. Ruth Eyers, £ president, in charge. S* L HEAD TELEOKAPH WANT ADS REHEARSAL OF KIWANIS KAPERS —So.itM. Don "Midnite" Morrr.on. Al "Snowball" Bernard, "Mow" Prim Roy, "HambonV A-mbruMrr. Orvillr "l.mibo" Maguirc. Homer "Sambo" Kennedy, and D;rccior Arthur!, Bnih-^f. I" b,.rk?,rnur,'l ,i\<< f--i.-..ard C LinrKiv interlocutor, and Ken O- iltnn, general chairman. Show v-MI \v: £- r " '-^i' by Joseph A. Ru'.so at Alton Senior High' school auditorium.—Photo Smith Addresses East Altonians EAST , ALTON — A. Edson Smith, principal at East Alton- Wood River Community High School, discussed "Prevailing Social nnd Economic Conditions," Tuesday evening before I lie East Alton Exchange Club at Hknggs. In the membership and attendance, conlost, It 'WHS determined that -the loam of which Robert Dunn Is the captain has a slight. lend over the'Dom BeneUl team. • Kenneth Douglns, George Oo- forth, nnd Les Forman were guests of members of the club. The Board of Control met-after dismissal of the regular club meeting. East Alton Scouts Finish Badge Requirements EAST ALTON - Members nf Intermediate Girl Scout Trpop 5r^ completed rcqulremcnls necessary to receive their dramatics bridge Wednesday afternoon nl I heir regular nulling nl Washington School. Mrs. Herman V. Meyer was pros- cut nl the meeting Inst week to instruct the scouts In the music portion of the badge requirements. Yesterday, the girls dramatized Ihn bnllard "The Balitf's Daughter of Islington." Awards which the scouts have earned during the past yenr will Legion Supports 'Divine'' Program Al East Alton EAST ALTON—American Post 7!M went on record to support the "Divine Guidance" pro- grain launched by IhP national comnmnder and the national executive committee. Purpose nf Ihu program is to encourage n gn-to-church campaign. The decision was reached at " meeting nf the Legionnaires Monday evening at American Legion home. John Gohle, commander, announced "Poppy Dnys" would bo observed by the local post, and Its Auxiliary, May '26 and 21. Goble stated that profits from the Legion's poppy sales ore split three ways. The veterans are paid for making the poppies, the Legion posts and Auxiliary units keep a share,-and the balance goes to maintain the Illinois Legion rehabilitation department. The local Post, and Auxiliary sell poppies mario by disabled veterans at Alton Stale Hospital, The Auxiliary has ordered 2500 popples. T. K. DeGerlia, senior vice- be mode later at a public ceremony. Mrs. Richard Early and Mrs. Otto Brazier are leaders of th<? troop. commander, reported membership of the post i« !H percent of the 1049 total. Dr. I'rnnk'Klnlnsek, rhnirhian of the education committee of the Wood River Township Unit of Community Blood Donors, spoke before the group, urging support of future visits of the bloodmobtlc to this community. The* Legion- imlreg yoted to support the free blood program and at the next meeting will set a date at which tlrne the bloodmobtle will visit •MBMMBBBMBIMV . EAST 'ALTON. — Mrs. Arthur Mouser, Wood River, was elected chairman of the Wood River Town* jhlp Girl Scout Leaders' Club, Monday evening at the Community Building. Other officers elected were Mrs. Albert Doerr, Roxana, vice-chairman, and Mrs. Truman Vroman, East Alton, secretary-treasurer. Miss Ruth Toorney, physical education director of School District 104, Instructed the group In square dancing. Mrs. Leo Wools, East Alton, Is the retiring president. Representatives from Cottage Hills, Roxana, Wood River, and East Alton were present. Appointed Scoutmasters EAST ALTON. — John Bowers and Arthur Lawrence, Jr., have been appointed as scoutmasters for Intermediate Troop 11, which is sponsored by the Brotherhood of the First Baptist Church. Twelve scouts were present for the first meeting Tuesday evening under the 'direction of the now scoutmasters. Troop 11 meets each Tuesday at 7:30 p. m. at the First Baptist Church. ; A;Social hour followed the busi- rtess meeting with Robert Tolllver arid Lorcll Hicks in charge of refreshments. East Alton Note,* EAST ALTON — Mrs. George Rleken, 626 Bowman, is a patient at Wood River Township Hospital this week for observation. Mrs. Ricken entered the hospital Mon- dny. Mrs. Mae Bashnm, 620 Washing- Ion, is some improved following on illness nf several days at her home. Mrs. Basham Is able to be up and about the home most of each day. \ Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Genard, Granite City, visited recently with Mr. and Mrs. Levl Campbell, 420 Monroe. Mrs. Genard and Mrs. Campbell were school friends more than 40 years ago In the vicinity of Fleldon. The two have visited only once since attending school. H. L. Parker l« some improved after an Illness of more than a '{•-', > It Pays To Buy QUALITY Barleff It Pays To Buy QUALITY HOME OWNED In a wink I Never needs an iron! to last and lastl fmarf French cuff*/ tatelf Co'/lar Perfect- far keepsl Poroui weove for venfi/af/on/ Manformedf (Cut to fit your figure I) Th« "Manhattan" Manton, « Ypu'll want tp buy wveral, when you «ee these stunning Manlon ihirti at OPEN FRIDAY EVENING UNTIL 8 I 1 , M. s. 4. • Alton'* Home Qwneci Store for M*» and Young Men, . "" 1 '•• ' Boyle Picks Ten Residents For Atom Refuge week. Mrs. Parker resides at the home of his son and daughter-in law, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parker, 527 Monroe street. Miss Mabel Stephens Is a guest at the home of her nephew and niece, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Wools, 428 Wood River avenue. Miss Stephens is fvom Corning, Ark., and was brought to Kast Alton by Mrs. Wools, who spent the last weekend In Corning. Mrs. W. 0. Hettel, also of Corning, was an additional guest at the Wools' home Wednesday. Mrs. Hcttcl is visiting relatives in St. Louis. . Russell Malson jr., 2, son of Mr. and Mrs. Russel" Malson, 531 Monroe, received emergency treatment at Wood River Township Hospital, Tuesday at 6 p. m., for lacerations of the hand. He was released after treatment. Judith Turpcnlng, 11, 435 Bowman, received emergency treatment at Wood River Township Hospital Tuesday at 8 p. m. for an injury to her eye which she received while playing. She was released after treatment. By HAL BOVLfi NEW YORK—(/Pi—If America were destroyed by atomic bombing, Nvhat 10 living beings should be teved? Thli question has been posed by Lester Dill, owner of the Meramec (Javerna at Stanton, Mo. 'iDllI recently asked the reconstruction Finance Corp. for ft million-dollar loan to transform nil i6«mlle.ieng cave Into an Oeark atdtf refuge, H« also asked a group of writers to nominate 10 Americans who, In lite event of national disaster, should be given top priority as tenfflils of his modern underground Noab'l ark. 1 ended up by picking two lists. Dill ihlmself Isn't on either—as whd, 'forced to live in a cave, Want* to be dunned by a landlord? 1 bypassed all politicians, too, to gel rid of the tax problem, once and for all. My first list Is purely selfish: 1. My wife, Frances. 2. Me. 3. Gypsy Rose Lee. 4. Thoma* Hart Benton, the Artist. 5. Tallulah Bankhead. fi. Burl Ivcs, the guitar-twanging folk signer. 7. A good bartender. 8. A psychiatrist. 9. Oswald Jacoby, the card expert. 10. Any 2-year-old child. With a group like this you could have fun Indefinitely, Jacoby would teach me how to play canasta, I'd learn to dance with Miss Lee, and Miss Bankhead and Benton are two of Hie most entertaining talkers alive. The reason for Including the bartender and psychiatrist is simple. One would listen to my troubles and the other would explain my nightmares. Why the child? Well/ when everybody got bored, they could just watch the child play—and feel better. My second list of Americans has six animals and four humans on it: A cow and a bull, a married team of horses, two ha'pplly wedded dogs, a young minister and his wife, and a young farmboy and his best girl, { » These 10 could foUjid a new civilization,, and whether it would turn out better or worse than the one it. replaced no one can tell, Open Friday Eve 'til 9 P.M. Barleff's HOME OWNED It Pa.vs To BUY QUALITY iitiniiiini; Fine, alUvool gabardine... silky texture ,,, with toft colors of tan. grey, blue g^ey •nd green, You'll get a lift from the new patch pocket jackeu that double up at iportcogu, And top value at Clotheraft's • $« *wazmg low price *ti9 PANT* Hom» Owntd Store iw Men and Young Mtn, at Green's SPRING CLEARANCE Fashionable Spring a Dresses * Coats * Suits • At Tremendous Savings Gigantic Spring Suit Sale Every Spring Suit at Clearance Prices Misses sizes Junior sizes • Women's sizes • Half sizes Every Spring suit now priced lor clearance. Now you can buy those famous name* high style, top flight suits at a fraction of their former price. Dressmaker, tailored, bolero and box jacket styles in gabardine, milateen, worsted crepe, pin checks and sharkskins. Wonderiul range of colors. Navy, black too. To $65 $ 38 To $49.95 Suits . . S 30 To $39.95 Suits . . To $29.95 Suits . . All 3*piece Suits now j Suits with matching or contrasting top coats reduced one-third. Pin checks, sharkskins, garbardines and combinations , Off SOME . . . MORE Gigantic Spring Coat Sale Every Spring coat drastically reduced. Long coats in fitted, boxy and belted styles; shortie coats in boxy and belted styles. All from our famous name lines—wonderful selection of colors — sizes for misses, juniors and women. Coats To $45 Coats To $55 Coats S 34 To $69.95 Coats . 44 DRESSES Our first dress clearance oi the season. Hundreds of lovely Spring dresses now at sensationally reduced prices. Beautiful prints in navy, black and light Spring pastels. Tailored and dressy gabardines. Sizes for women, misses and juniors. To $15 Dresses To $19.95 Dresses < To $25 Dresses To $29.95 Presses 15 Third

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