Sterling Daily Gazette from Sterling, Illinois on November 6, 1941 · Page 5
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Sterling Daily Gazette from Sterling, Illinois · Page 5

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Sterling, Illinois
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Thursday, November 6, 1941
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Page 5
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, November 6, STEELING DA IV GAZETTE, STERLING, ILLINOIS Holiday Opening 111 Be Held Here Wednesday, Nov. 26 New !HC Head Merchants Decide Against Christmas Lights This Year Bterlin? retail m r r r ' »r.'- 5 a* the tegular month'.v rti^rirz h r :d nn Wprine.sdav p\rnine. o?f:--.a:;v decided that there wi;i b<" m <-rpp* deems this venr !r..v>fld. each .nerchsnt will ron^n'rv nn decorating hi* own store fror.t TO f.m his own tfl.ste At thr M-itur <:rr,r ^.-ra:^'nirnt* were mad* 1 fnr thr hr...-/r.- opening. which will be nn o'.it.s:ar.ri:ng e\e- It was set for tr.p \Vedn«>s- ^Jay following tii? new Thnnksziv- Ing. Nov. 26. In cn-'f of inclement westher it will !*> h<\d thr next evening. There wilf b« a parade, a Window unveiling and all ;V,ares of _slne*s will be open from 7 until ^, In order that patrons may Ret a preview of the Christmas good.-; on display. Local merchants were enthusia.s- tlc over the prospects for the holi days and expect one of the ddcs this year in local history. Proposed Wage Raise Disappointing to the ^Railway Workers Here Local railroad employes are disappointed over the resultant report ol the President's fact finding board named to investigate the wage prob- Jem in the industry. Most of them "" id confidently expected the board "would find in their favor. Wot only the small wage Increase named, about 12 1-2 per cent on the average, was disappointing to the local men but the fact that the pro- wage Increase is only tem« •. extending to December b Tina. Some ol the men expressed |.the opinion that at the end of that ; period the roads would ask for a return to the present wage scale, but to addition might ask for a decrease have it retroactive at the same lie. There was comendation of Presi- Roosevelt in announcing the fact finding board result so promptly. It was said that he could have ^withheld this for some time, pos- ilbly until the first of the next year lie law provides for a 30-day intermission before a strike could be called on the railroads. As it Is now the earliest date on which a strike .could be called would be December 5 ^ It Is anticipated that there wil more negotiations -between the 'railroads and the employe unions 'with the possibility of some kind o: compromise. Story Book Ball Draws Big Crowd At Public Library C. Cal Johnson, who succeeds Earl C Lutz a.s superintendent of the Rock Falls works of the International Harvester Co. and Ramc 1 ;. Candy was served and a splendid time was reported by all of the youngsters present. Evangelist Rollins Preaches Inspiring Sermons Each Night Wednesday evening. Rev. K. C. Bechtel, pastor of the Church of the Brethren, paid special tribute to the men of the church, many of whom were present to hear Rev. B. M. Rollins who preached on the subject. "What Must I Be to Be Saved?" In the devotional period Rev. Mr. Bechtel read John 1:1-14. Prayer was offered by Rev. I. D. Lratherrnan. pas- to>- of the Church of the Brethren at Lanark. Instead of telling a story for the benefit of the children. Mrs. Rollins painted a beautiful rag picture and used the loved poem, "One Ship Sails East." Evangelist Rollins explained what Jesus. Paul. Mark. John and Peter said about the way'to be saved. The apostle Paul said that it was necessary to believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, which means, not only to know of Hun, but to accept Him as Saviour. By His grace, and our faith are we saved. Jesus did not die as a martyr, but died voluntarily for our sins, and was raised from the dead. showing HLs death was not in vain. Mark said to repent and believe. The Bible tells us what things are sin. also that we shall reap what we sow. shall reap more and lonfer than we have sowed, and others shall reap our sowing also. God's Justice demands that those who will not repent must go to hell, which surely "" Sterling Ends Grid Season Friday Night In Game at Clinton COfU h 'TV-cl sMi'-id wii; taV.r hi' (to'.rlrn Warriors to Clinton Friday nlzh' for thr srirl finn> Thr Earn* 1 n «•: ii rr l'.i: r d to *iait prompt!'.' nt 7 *.'-> Coarh JVid 1>r- hune and hi<- f;o-;--vr,;V ri ., W! ;; ; i; ft y tn the afteni<>o:i. tin. 1 " canr 1 starting at 3:3<V Twenty "Miuir 1 WL: don their football suits for the :,!'• time in hizh school p'.av J-ixi.v. lueht. In the starling lineup their are eizht senior?;. Tliev nre CV>-C°«pts. F, Ne'.son. Harry Woodyatt. N. Zizier, D. Leonard, h Dah'.ercn. C Mil'.er. J. Gould and H. Rf-er Remaining regulai* are K pri;-r; C Kcl!v and •' On'- loway. Ottier srniot> on the squad are \V. F:icdrichs. K. Hunsbeiger. R. Kostcr. O. Hur.^x-rgrr. M. Shurrian. E. Browne. R Woodyatt. Lans'orri. L. Gould. J. Foy, R. Fiuck and R. Hulls. Clinton got away to » .'•low start this afRfon and met up with several defeats before Retting into the victory lane, and since the first victory the team has been showing much Improvement nnd has clipped several strong opponent*. Th> officials will be Bob Austin. Davenport, referee; J. R Clark. Rock Island, umpire; and Fred Winters, Cedar Rapids, headllnesman. fnt-TlKtnt nf <t"*il"t«mnr Sixty Tables Played At Weekly Party for St. Mary Parishioners Mr. nnd Mrs. Thomas McCormlck were chairmen and Mr. and Mrs. T J. McDonnell were cochairmen for the weekly party of 81. Mary parish Wednesday evening. Card players enjoyed games at 60 tables, the high scorers taking prizes. Those- fortunate In the games were the following: Auction bridge. Mrs. H. O. G«offroy and F. M. Schumacher; contract bridge. Mrs. W. J. McCarthy and Ous Williams; pinochle, Mrs. Ada Hollowcll and Joe Lee; five hundred, Mrs. Mary Roark and Ambrose McDonnell; euchre. Mrs. D. Flynn and Edwin Kaffer; and special prize. Mrs. Fluck. Serving on the committee were James Adams, sr., Kenneth Bankes, David Beauvats, Joseph Bonardi. Sherman Brown. Mrs. Edward Carlson, Frank Cle'mentz, Thomas Con- Ion, Dallas Curtis. Daniel Donahue, Leo Eckert, Thomas Finnan, Mrs, Catherine Flynn. John Gaffey. Oscar G«offroy. Margaret Greenway, Robert- Harms, Sterling Holmes, Mary Kane. Mrs. Edwin Kcreven. Eugene Kohl. Thomas Lcndman. Ennis Matera. Edna Mills. Edward Mc- Girl Scout leaders Enrol! for First Aid Course of Red Crass Fourteen Oirl Scout leaders ha'. enrolled for the 24-hoiir R"i sr^ planning to join this ria.v at nent meeting. The group m Monn'sv night from 7 to 9 at. On- trR] «.rnoo!. 9"ith W. I,. Cc*ddir>s^ton B.<; sn^fruftor Thi- 1 '- is p. psrt of ti." tra:n:ne which the .Sterling-Ro' < Fan* Girl Scout coxmril offers i'.s ipflders. W. J, Sowies Speaks to High School Retail Group on Wednesday "B*" polite, regardless of what th*> customer does" were words of caution given to the students in the claw of retail selling at 8teri;nE high school after school Wednesday. W J. Sow IPS of Rock Falls spoke to the group on how to become familiar with the merchandise and to be- rotn* oriented to the new situations. Get plenty of sleep, be on time for work, do not chew gum. It is important to wall upon easterners )n order. Do not try to "oversell" anything. Learn the quality of your merchandise and avoid the use of the word "guarantee." Keep busy at nil times. Straighten the merchandUe. look around and become familiar with your Mock. Watch older employes and ask their advice. Study sales tax bracket.", and know which Items have the 10 per cent excise t*x. Wrap packages with care and try not to waste wrapping paper and string. Don't forget to read the "ads" of the concern for which you are working. Mrs. Ida May Bundy, Former Resident, 97 r Is HI in Morrison inx Judy Alberson and Nancy Joy 6ul- were the winners in the con- •t, the Story Bock ball, held at •the library Wednesday -afternoon, they having found more book titles jn the slogan. "Forward with Books." than any other contestants. The contest was a tie between the two each was given a prize. The attendance of fourth and fifth I,graders was much larger than had 4lwtn expected. Each" was costumed [.'to represent the character from some t. Some exceptionally clever coa- M were the result. rThe-timr was spent COMBINATION DOORS N1 Screen Door in Summer 1 A Storm Door in Winter Our price* are about % lets then you would expect to pay for tiMMt quality doon. Made •f white pine — free from all imperfection*. Long-lif* gal- vaniied wreen wire-— beat clear vision flasi. A trifle wider and longer than sixes listed to pro- for trim. )NOMY DOOR, [t-ft, *-in. x «-ft,8-in., prkt Mt r i.in. x «-ft, 8-in., for LVB FUEL WITH WEATHERSTRIP Brass and Felt fcr 4oor bottom, at . Strip Felt weatherstrip— Our pri«, each „„ it; two for lie with tacks, per ft,'..., tVt< SCOT T John said, that we must confess Christ as our Saviour, and confess our sins to Him. and to the ones we have wronged. Rev. Mr. Rollins declared that to promiscuously confess to everyone and anyone is unnecessary, and often does harm. Peter added that we should be baptized. Nearly all churches practice baptism. Jesus said to believe and be baptized, and He himself was baptized for an example. Weather conditions have been unfavorable since the series of meetings started, but much interest has been shown, and the attendance has been good. Each evening Evangelist Rollins has a message of help and inspiration to all. The meetings will continue each evening through Sunday. Allister. Arthur McCue, jr., Paine* McOann. Vera McKcnna. Harold Nolan. Charles Owens, James Powers. Hubert Relly. Ann Ryan, Herbert Shore. Mrs. Grace Sprinkle. William Stanley. John Wagner and Bernicc Wlnkler. The lizard's tail separates from his body easily •> and without loss of blood. Even fright is enough to cause it to detach Itself. ROBT. MITCHELL INSURANCE !• AH IU BraaefcM -SCUTI BONDS— CHESTER'S dirtBaser Chenille Bedspreads fill Sizi $3.79 Heavy chenille beautiful patterns and color combination. 'Tub-faat. SHERBETS and 80BUTS 9c «ACH - Clear glass with pattern*. A real buy at ..ttM5,,.V>w price. Priscilla and Cottage SETS S9c FAIE Woven figure marquisette In both cottage and ruffled curtains. PART LINEN I 14c YAMD Part linen toweling. 16 in. wide, wide colored striped border, bleached and unbleached. MU.S. Double Blankets 70x80 $1.29 Large block: plaids, nice weight, double blankets. Women's Flannelette $1.25 Warm heav> weight flannelette in plain and color com- binatioiu. Well tailored ... full cut. TUBFAST PRINTS 17c YARD 36 inch width) prints that arej tub-fast, in new| patterns. SPECIAL! TilLE LAMPS $1-39 See this real buy in table lamps. Mr-- Ida Mav B':rri-. Iv of th:,«; nfv. t.s 5«r : -T hr.mr of ri^r rU'if- cr ,!nrv;-i-v 1. •/ ]', no- '::e c>: Ca;>'n:n M P the ljn\i ; :'. \7frir. of dOT.' of Ihe T :nfan- - a srrat ftn d n-.anv \>- W r.- m I: r H .:::;• . l *' l ad. corner of Tr.::d 5-U FVvjrth a'.ririe. \Vr.rr, T--.P b-^ine.^ ^ii.'trirt n^rro^rr.rd 'i; 1> on tr.a* part of town. th r r.rvi.-r ^a. 5 - !<">rn down and Mrr- R'.iiid 1 -' rr.?.<if '''.T h--»r!-' > «t ' ^i r I'.nt^l !'i. c * qrinv *i". r 5trTt for M".oral >far. r For H number n f > r ar> .'h* 1 has rriari^ her rorr.c ^'.'1". r.rr d^j^hter. Hrr mind remain.^ •r\.*-^.n'. r.ear de- r-pue hrr RE^ and 5he Jcrr;^ in con- .stant touch 'ith. h'r rt;snv old frirnds in 5!'':l:ne ar.d \;~:r.:t\. who w-.ii regret to learn that she is failing rapidly. Worst- Season for Corn Husking Here in Many Years, Farmers Assert Continued wet weather has played havoc with corn husking in this territory, it is noted from the condition of the fields. There are but few In which tractors and mechanical pickers can be put to work. Now and then there are field?, that have been harvested with this equipment, but the vast majority is still standing corn and untouched As far as possible hand husking is being done It Is laborious and diffi- OTten fm<* CPPS ^omm follo*- hf wngrm hmfciRB with the. Thf. fields for the mnwt pnrt, are soffsy. It is the worst earn husking seawn in many ye*r«. old farm- pr , «^>.rt in addition to thr diffi- rulty in harvest Inn the crop the moisture content is very great, ranging from IS to 25 per cent. Were there dry weather thh «ittiation •RTTiirf b^ iW'pf nved. Ti'-.f Ts^t fr?: days of wet u-rather leave httlf hope for benefit throiigh thr westher. '.Vith *.ov tyans s similar ronrtltion exi«i« to that of corn. "HTTP have I" ~en fomp combin»*5 nt work on this crop but. at be<:t it has tv*>n n very crop in this territory this year. The yield has been n complete failure on many farms. Soy hearts can- noi be stored unless dry RS th r y deteriorate very rapidly when stored wet. Vesper Services for Four Sunday Nights At Christian Church this r r h? 1 «t A o'clock. Famlll^ are u to mftke th«"v> r^rvlf^s ' fnmiiy ninR at the church " Whlip tyry Sunday rvrni.'.isj vr*p"r* and Wl:irst Ion MTvirr !• nniQ'ir 1' '•'• PT*- ulnr with ninny church<vv A Mmiiar prosrftm is brine rarrM on.! hv th<~ PiT*bvt/ % rlnn rhurrh of Mom<on nrx! by n croup of n!'Mp> rhiirchr*. in Prnrtn T!; BN:krr of 1!if Mmii-'>n F Rr\ Mr ( our jeh!irch will f>r tlT- n<lii:t f closing iann r d for tj-.r la^t :'•, m No'.rrTilTT at tin., i"nn Mriift. TlT-ywill ChriMlnn rhtirdi A' f\ 4."i Mr; fho;r rlir^-ci ifx-i i)! ( ;i- a:-<i tu ni f "-'-.Tsri ri'xl cia Marian Nunr- r. *\.\ ronrltict woi k fnr s tins nr.i- for adui!."; *"opir ar.rl Praise Geo. Pfislerer For Outstanding Work At Chicago 0PM Clinic George E. Pfixterer. formerly of (tils city and now a resident of FvanMon. was associate director of th clinic on defense contracts for manufacturers. conducted last month by the OPM in Chicago for the purpose of aiding smaller manufacturers In obtaining defense contracts. As such, he has been cited for his splendid work by W. Homer Harts, federal coordinator of the Chicago OPM. Pflsteref. who Is power sales engineer for the Commonwealth Edison company, gave up his regular work In order to handle the work of thr clinic. He was born In Sterling, graduated from 8HS, received his BS degree In mechanical engineering at the University of Illinois and spent 11 years as sctTctary of the 1 Midwest Power conference, going iwlth Commonwealth Edison four v ea rs ago. ******************* THE MCE! r.'uldirn Til! r-oniing Sunriav r\pni:is Mrs. v^ila*- iir.ir^ will r»s>rn the adult Dorics f>; di. ••]"!'•!!• tinrl .Irrorv Roi>bln5 wiii \rnr\ thr vo:ms |w op'.r v dlscus- ' K>n trouj). clydr \Vrniilng will l-,avr cliarcr nT DSP interniediatf?. Mr c Aif fitiork and Mrs. Wainr (iraL-i;; wi;i rare for tl-.r c'hlldrt'n's work (Jrndrtl mi.^Monary education materials will Ix- :\<-r<\. Tlie youne p^oplr and adults will n.«,r the text • Christian Imperative," by Roswell P. Barnes. Following thr study period* the entire group will rnopt together for B Mirprisy period. Adjournment will William Deem and Wife Are Married 40 Years Mr juid Mrs \Vi:!i ;) ni \V !"><•••-]-. ar^ rrrrume rn;n.:!ntu!a'!n;u "vinv on thrir 40th wrr|<|in K ainii\ri-arv They nrr rrlrhratinc thr rxrtit Pun- day whrn thrv will ho cii^t/' at a family dinner in thr hnsr.r nt t:ir;r son-in-lnw and finuchfr-r. Mr. P.T-'< Mrs N. M. Fouitl.^- .SUIH|H\ al'r:- noon from 2 to . c > o'ckvk Mr and Mrs. I>rm will hnlrl nprn hou.tr nt ihrlrhom' 1 . 706 Pnrk plncr Mayer Funeral Home Andrew F Meyer t02 Fourth Are. PHONE MAIN I 9«ors?. • when you can get Improved Chrysler Fluid Drive with 2,OOO,OOO,OOO miles of owner satisfaction behind It! I T HAS happened again! Chrysler Fluid Drive and Vacamatic transmission have started a trend the motor car industry is attempting to follow^ The overwhelming popularity of Chrysler fluid Drive makes it natural that various kinds of "liquid" and "automatic" drives should now appear. Some of these designs only remotely resemble Chrysler Fluid Drive . . . either in principle or in results. For real driving satisfaction, it Is still best to buy genuine Fluid Drive ., . the one backed by greatest experience and favorable public acceptance. Now going into its fifth year, Chrysler Fluid Drive has got all .,•*--» America asking "Why shift gears?" But only Chrysler can give you Chrysler's tested and proved answer to this question. More than two billion miles of owner satisfaction recommend Chrysler Fluid Drive and Vacamatic transmission. Further advanced in the beautiful TOW Chrysler^ this famous drive gives you the peak of effortless driving . . . liquid smoothness ... fuel conservation ., . more power per gallon. try Fluid Driving in a Chrysler. It's the biggest thing in modern motoring! We'll be delighted to show you just how thrilling it is. (FLUID MIVI AND VACAMATIC TtAMSMtSSJON ... GIT MODIIN DISION WEAVER MOTOR SALES STERLING, ILL. **8 Wcki 5th St. Tobaccos Velvet. PYtnce Albert, Half * Half, Blf 10e 5e Brandii 2 for 5c SWEAT SHIRTS Heavy fleece lined. Regular Our First Anniversary To Tht Pcoplt Of This Community: It to with deep (ratification and sincere appreciation that we announce onr first anniversary. O«r policy, "Quality Merchandise at Lowest Prices" in face of the rising market will be main-' talned through buying connections with stores hi the Tri-CHies. THE ECONOMY STORE '«f W. THIRD ST. STERLING 69c up MEN'S FLANNEL SHIRTS Plaids $1.25x Values TUFF COMPO SOLE. SEWED AND NAILED. 8ERVUS BRAND Ovtrsboo* Kvcry pair gvaran teed. Special ..... , KM leather upper*, katfccr lln- M, MiU leather 4» f Mte*. Special .. 9 J> * JACKETS Waterproof ••ede, fleece .lined, full ripper, BOSS Munkeface Gauntlets 35c values. Limit 2. SUEDE JACKETS Genulae leaher, knit col lar* and cnffi, fe value* . ........ SPORT JACKETS Genuine leather •port model*. Caperidn or suede. SfcM value* .... ALL WOW. S HEAVYWEIGHT 3« and up. FlwslMMI $1.60 0« BEG. MUCE Men's Bibbed SUITS 'Me* Weight r." 79e SWEATERS Milwaukee and Campw brand*. Newest cotar* and Oft« DIE&S SHOES Calfskui uppers, selld leather soles, steel areh, Goodyear welts. variety of styles and shades. M.M to I5.M values. WMNMD PUTS BatUt AM aaaUri**^ at *nly ....$» • 99 or white. ILitvoJuos Others Up From Me OlnraTi KIT CoovpMe with VMM •hUe Special $1.19 OUVES rHple stitched, riveted. 2 for Me Econemy Army Store Zl W. TWIIID ST.-^STItLING QUALITY MltCHANDISI—LOWHT ftlCIS

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