Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on February 18, 1964 · Page 4
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Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 4

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Garden City, Kansas
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Tuesday, February 18, 1964
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Page 4
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"Scoop, if your gossip column f alia to mention my •«-—i just one more time, I'll sue for libel!" Young Hobby Club Extra Shelf Easily Made; Nice to Have By CAPPY DICK The medicine cabinet in a bathroom has less shelf space than any other shelf unit in the house. By folowing today's fun-project plan, a boy or girl can show Mother and Dad how to increase that shelf space. Find a cardboard box about Cardboard Bex five inches long, three inches wide and three inches high (see Figure 1). Remove the top and use the bottom part (or the top part, which ever is highest). Remove most, of each side {not the ends), leaving triangular pieces at the corners as shown in Figure 2. This is the new shelf for the cabinet. Cover the edges of the cardboard with plastic tape to prevent them from becoming torn in use. Figure 3 shows the new shelf in place in the cabinet. As you can see, it not only provides space on which small objects may be placed, but there is space beneath where other small things may be stored. Without such a shelf all the space above small objects on the regular shelves is totally wasted. You could add several such shelves to the cabinet, and might even build one long shelf extending the length of a regular shelf. TOMORROW: Puzzlt contetM Try for • big national prize I Steel War To Replace Chicken War By JAM BAWSON Al» §u»ln**» Newt Analyst NEW YORK (AP)—The chicken war could be succeeded by a steel war. American and European steel producers are at odds over imports and tariffs. And the dispute may become one of the sorest when a new round of international tariff cutting talks starts in Geneva in May. increased tariffs by the European Common Market on American frozen chickens caused the hottest friction last year. American steel executives today are telling a U.S. Tariff Commission hearing of their complaints against a rising flow of foreign steel into U.S. markets. They also are asking measures to broaden the export business for American steel mills. The European Coal and Steel Community already has acted. Saturday it raised its tariffs on imports of low-priced steel and cast iron. The community—the six Common Market nations — also reports a big upsurge in orders for its steel mills. It says most of the orders are coming from within the Common Market- West Germany, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. Steel producers outside the Common Market aren't happy that the duties are being raised against them—to an average of 9 per cent. American producers haven't TII««|«Y, City Tcteijrnm tl, It 44 Ado Gets New Cops On Teetih, Gain* Weight WICHITA (AP)—Ada, at 14, has new caps on her front teeth anr! is eating so much better she is gaining weight. She was only 11 years old when her teeth went bad but for a cow that's middle age or beyond. While Ada, an Ayrshire, was at Kansas State University a veterinary student decided to make Ada's teeth a class project. He put stainless steel caps on five front teeth. She is now owned by Jim Davis. been happy that European steel export prices have been lower than the prices charged Com- I mon Market consumers— or the prices of American steel products here. But with th« rise In demand in Europe, the six nations may find less need to export— and to maintain lower prices to do so. And already export prices of some European steel products have risen above charges of a year ago. While the European steel mills are enjoying something of a boom in new order, so are the American. U.S. mills are raising their estimates of industry shipment in the first three .months of this year to more than 19 million tons. This compares with 17 million in the final three months of 1963 and 18 million tons in the first quar- tr of last year. The American mills export- import troubles are outlined to the Tariff Commission today by John P. Roche, president of the American Iron & Steel Institute. He says steel imports here In 1963 climbed to a record 5.5 million tons, while exports of U.S. steel have been stalemated at 2 million tons, or ony about half of the average in 1953-57. Roche holds that loss of world markets, plus rising imports here, has meant that some 40,000 steel workers were deprived 1 of more than $300 million in wages and salaries. American steel makers are urging U.S. negotiators at the Geneva meeting of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade to fight for tariffs that wi" equalize prices of American and foreign made steel. BEST SEED COMPANY SEEDS FEEDS FERTILIZERS SEED CLEANING AND TREATING AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS Phon. BR 6-692 1 102 S. 9th St. Garden City, Kaniat February 18, 1964 Mr. Irrigation Farmer South West, Kansas Dear Mr. Farmer: Is Hit nitrogtn ftrtiliMr you art usiiiq Hw proper kind for you? All types of nitrogen fertilizer are good, when properly applied. Some of the characteristic! that are claimed by these different types of nitrogen are: 1. Quick Acting 4. Easy to Apply 2. Long Lasting 5. Reasonably Priced 3. No Loss 6. Safe to use. i Any one of the types of nitrogen used in S.W. Kansas will meat certain of these claims, but not any of them will meet all of them. Therefore, when you select the one you plan to use, it is wist to select one that meets most of these specifications. We think Aqua Ammonia comet nearer meeting all these specifications than any other type of nitrogen. It is IOH« tasting, v«ry link) chanc* for loss, oasy to apply, very reasonably and safe to use. In California, where Aqua Ammonia was first used, the number of tons of Aqua Ammonia used in 1962, according to U.S.D.A. records, was greater than Anhydrous Ammonia, MM pressure nitrogen solutions, ammonium nitrate, end urea all combined. There must be a valid reason. We suggest you try it thii year in comparison to the type you are now uiing. You be rfce judge. Prove on your own form whether the type you ore now using Is best for you, or if you thouM follow the lead «f these California farmers wno have switched I* Aqua Am. Call MI at Best Seed Co. let us tell yov «b«w* Aqua Ammonia and how it will help you make more money in your farming operations. Yours very truly L. E. Anderson BEST SEED COMPANY Tbf |*it S«fd Co. w*rr«nti to th f «x««ot «f (h» purch»«« prict th«t th« ««««< told «r« «« d«icnt>»d «n ih» CQnt*in«r within r*cogniz*d tol«r«nct». S*ll*r givti no othfr or further w«rr*nty. MICKIY MOUSt / SOOPV! \ [ WHAT ARE 1 "YOU POlNS? J VVSLL... I MAPS A WISH HEKE LAST VEAK... tmtrttuM tr fft t>Ofm t&HKL ... NOW t'Ar\ TRVIN' TO SEE WHSKB IT WiNT/ BEETLE BAILEY PONT GO OUT ITHOUT VD SAUOSMES, you SOUND OUST LIKE MOM ETTA KETT POGO IT'S YOUR MOTHER/ SHE SAVS COME ^/ 1 CANT \ I EATING"^ WAY HOME/DINNTP'S )7 TALKWlfH ) \CU, MOME- SEADY.'^ , r -—-S\ MY MOUTH FULL HI MOM.'I'M I MAD THE FIRSTCOURSE AT PAMELA'S/SECOND COURSE AT SVLVIA'S - SNUFFY SMITH WE'RE GOIW OVER TO LUKEY'S HOUSE 7 DO YE WANT O TAG ALONG WIF ME. OL' BULLET? I WONDER WHAT HE'S GOT AQ'IMST LUKEy STEVE CANYON IT POESNT\ WHO \ IT'S 76 ^ SEEM FAIR/ \TrlCUeHr\AVOIp — UNUES5 I UP THAT j A THINS POTC0T<5ET5| *W.£?/U)CE7)tf THE MOST r^~J(Km TWO VOTES / ^-<L YEARS A50J B-B-E-W0CS MOTHER WAS HURT... BUT TOE OlfcEN WINNER, MUST BE PRESENT WHEN TOE RESULT ANNOUNCE? THEN POTBGT WIU. WIN LEGITIMATE IV —oa-AH- BV PBFAULT P£AN ANP THE /V1AN fHOM THE ACCOIINTJM6 JIBT TOOK Off •/ PLANE-To REAP THE ECSUt-TS IN p-S- i-WOCi PR ATTHJ HOSPITAL) QUICKLY THE WOOD 4PEEP5 THROU6H TH6 CEOWP TOVVARP THE A1AU- MEE SYM FOR THE SNOW BALL- THE RYATTS BLONDIC BLONPIE-- -N IT'S TIME WE -4 __ START CUTTING )S: DOWN ON THIS 7* RASH ANP V- IRRESPONSIBLE j" SPENDING AROUNPHERE V* ^ WE'VE GOT TO ^Hj|| TIGHTEN OUR BELTS ' ANDLAUNCH A SINCERE ANP EFFECTIVE ECONOMY DRIVE [TELL ME ABOUT IT LATER, PEAR -THERE'S A SALE AT TUUBURY'S ANP I PON'T WANT TO BE LATE 'SOMEHOW. JQON'T THINK MY SPEECH HAP ) ,, THE IMPACT < \^

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