The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on December 11, 1956 · Page 19
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 19

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, December 11, 1956
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Page 19
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atS&ki.' 1 * i In my younger days there used i to be twelve whole months between Christmases. We started j counting the weeks until Christmas about the same time school opened in the fall and by November the great days still seemed a long way off. The first few days of December really dragged for we had already listed and re- listed our expected gifts and those last two weeks before December 25 took an eternity. * * * Nowadays, Christinas comet oftener than it used to. It seems as if it were only last week that I took down the decorations and swept up the last of the tinsel from the tree. And here it is almost Christmas time again and I'm a long, long way from being ready for it. * * * I guest I'm not very efficient about Christmas preparation. I realize it is logical to get your shopping and wrapping done early, the Christmas cards addressed and sent and the holiday baking all sealed up in tins so that the last two weeks before Christmas are nice and serene and free from hurly-burly. Each year I resolve to do better, but every December 23 finds me still writing letters, still buying gifts and just starting, the gift wrapping. But just because I get all tied up in knots with the Christmas rush doesn't mean that I don't fully enjoy the joyous season. Almost a* long as the world has been celebrating Christmas there have been complaints that the holiday has become, "too commercialized", "too flippant" with not enough emphasis placed upon the true meaning of the day. All of these accusations are probably true, in part. We could simplify our observances of Christmas and concentrate more on keeping Christmas. Almost everything about our traditional Christmas preparations takes time, work and money on the part of someone. But if we are going to simplify our Christmases, just where are we going to start ? * * * Shall we stop giving presents or greatly cut down on our giving? Christmas puts an awfully big hole in the family budget and a strain on the shopper's feet. But the cu.st.om of gifts for Christmas is as old as the Gospel of the Christ Child itself. It was the three wise men from out of the east, Melchior, Caspar and Balthazar who gave the first earthly Christmas presents. But the most wondrous of all was the Babe in the manger — God's gift to the world, and down through the centuries some tiny molecule of this gift is supposed to be reflected even in the shaving lotion we give Uncle Elmer and the doll we pick out for Sister Susie. * * * Christmas should be a time to make other people happy and it van be done ,or at least the intention of doing so exercised, by giving gifts. Cheerful giving brings joy to the heart and it's better to be one than to be a receiver. As long as this is true, I am perfectly willing to cooperate to the fullest with my close friends and relatives. They can make their hearts real joyous by giving me as many presents as they want to and I'll be a good receiver as well as a giver. No, I don't think we want to eliminate presents from Christmas. * * » Now, take Christmas cards and letters. They take a lot of time and work and if we are going to simplify the holiday maybe we could start there. But can you imagine a holiday season without a note from your schoolday's pal about what has happened to her since the last time she wrote 12 months ago? Or a picture of the latest offspring of those nice people who once lived next door to you? And if you hang Christmas cards as part of the seasons' decorations as I do, you'd miss their bright and cheerful color. You don't get many holiday greetings if you don't send them, so 1 don't think I want to give up Christmas cards. * * * In December there are oodles and oodles of Christmas parties and programs. The first graders entertain their parents with their version of the "Christmas story; the fifth grade has an open house; the Junior High and High School choruses work hard on their program of Christmas music. Friends take advantage of holiday decorations to invite you to teas and card sessions, the sewing clubs take their husbands out to dinner and the church circles have their pot-lucks. * * * The sparkle in a child's eyes when he spots Mamma in the audience is worth every minute of the time it costs to go to a program during this busy season even if she has to put off the ironing. Christmas carols are lovlier than ever when sung by youthful voices. The parties are gayer, the greetings of friends warmer now than at any other time of year. I hope we don't have to give up either parties or programs in our effort to simplify Christmas. * • • When it comes right down to it, I suppose we could celebrate Christmas without a whole lot of goodies. Those butter cookies, fruit cakes, holiday breads, candies and chocolate covered nuts are downright fattening! But would it seem like Christmas to you, if we gals didn't get out the mixing bowls even once to whip up something especially for the holiday? I know that the true meaning of Christmas has little to do with pfeffernuesse, stollen and eggnog, but unless I'm forced to, I'm not planning to give them up. » * * Henry van Dyke says in his essay, "Keeping Christmas" that we should be willing to forget what we have done for other people and remember what other people have done for us. That we should consider the needs and the desires of little children and remember the weakness and loneliness of people who are growing old. That we should trim our lamps so that they will give more light and less smoke and that we should carry them in front so that our shadows will fall behind us. We should make a grave for our ugly thoughts and a garden for our kindly feelings. * * » Mr Van Dyke also says that if we are willing to believe, "that love is the strongest thing in the world — stronger than hate, stronger than evil, stronger than death — and that the blessed life which began in Bethlehem nineteen hundred years ago is the image and brightness of the Eternal Love" — then we can keep Christmas. * * * It seems to me, if we can truly comply with these specifications it won't matter one bit if we wrap our presents on November 10 or on December 24 or if we have blue or vari-colored lights on our Christmas tree. It won't matter if we promote or deny the Santa Claus legend or if we appear nicely groomed and rested New hit with millions! THESE WOMEN! . CHORUS -I've heard about YOU, Mr. Craiuhew, in a •df•service elevator!" on Christmas morning or in an old bathrobe all beaten out from the holiday rush. If the right spirit is in our hearts, then we can keep Christmas. , * * *' This week's recipe is one that I have used in this column every year for eight Christmases. If I think I'm going tb leave it out, someone always asks for it. It's Grandma's Christmas Bread — Stollen. 2 cups milk, scalded Vz cup shortening 2/3 cup sugar 2 teasp. salt Vi teasp. grated lemon rind 1 teasp. Mace 2 cakes compressed yeast ',4 cup lukewarm water 2 beaten eggs 8 cvips flour, divided into 4 cups each 1 cup raisins (white ones are nice) Mz cup chopped citron Viz cup chopped candied cherries M> cup slivered almonds 1 cup dried currants Combine milk, shortening, sugar, salt, mace and lemon rind. Cool to lukewarm. Add yeast softened in the warm water. Add eggs and mix well. Add the first 4 cups flour and beat well. Add fruits and remaining flour. Mix. Let raise until doubled in bulk. Punch down and knead lightly. Add a little more flour if the dough seems sticky. Form in loaves and let raise until double again. Bake in 350 degree oven about 45 minutes. Frost with confectioner's sugar icing and deco•rate, if desired. — Grace shall town the past fpw Weeks. Mrs Hanson makes her home with the Bakers. S-Sgt. Jim Smith left Tuesday for Selfridge air base near Detroit, after a 45 day furlough with his parents, Mr and Mrs Walter R. Smith. To X-Ray School Personnel At Swea City, Dec. 12 Swea Cily — A mobile x-ray unit will be in Swea City Wednesday, Dec. 12, from 2 to 2:30 p.m. to make a special survey of all school personnel including faculty and employees. Grant school personnel will also come to Swea City for x-rays. The x- ray unit is from the Kossuth County Tuberculosis Association. Christmas Party By Four Corners Club, Dec. 4th Portland — The Four Corner Social Club of Portland had its annual Christmas party and pot luck dinner Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Portland Community Hall. Those attending were Mr and Mrs Herbert Nelson, Randy and Kevin, Mrs Hazel Carroll, Mr and Mrs LJory Bartlett and Merlyn, Mr and Mrs W. J. Stewart, Mr and Mrs Donald Ringsdorf, Mrs Minnie Larsen, Lewis Larsen, Earl Zwiefel, Mr and Mrs Herman Harms, Mr and Mrs Bern'.ird Phelps, Virgil Heifner and Mr and Mrs Victpr Fitch. Mrs John Primasing, mother of Mrs W. J. Stewart, is a patient at Sacred Heart hospital at Le- Mars, Iowa. Mr and Mrs W. J. Stewart were Monday evening supper guests at the Lloyd Bartlett home in honor of Merlyn Bartlett's eighteenth birthday. The Portland Social Club will have its annual Christmas party next Thursday afternoon, Dec. 13 at the home of Mrs Franz Teeter. Roll call will be a cookie swap. Mrs Earl Zwiefel and Corinne and Mrs Lewis Larsen went to Mason City Tuesday, where Corinne entered the hospital for a check up, after becoming ill in school that morning. Rhr was back in school the next day and is feeling fairly good. Dr. C. J. Primasing of Melvin, Iowa, was a Sunday evening supper guest at the W. J. Stewart home. Dr. Primasing is a brother of Mrs Stewart. Mr and Mrs Herbert Weydert attended the Turkey banquet Tuesday evening at the Good Hope Lutheran church in Titonka, put on by Bartlett brothers. The Earl Ackerman family have been on the sick list the past week, with a siege of the flu. Mr and Mrs Herbert Weydert attended a Christmas party Sunday evening put on by the Needles and Pins Sewing Club, of which Mrs Weydert is a member, for their husbands, at the Mitch Taylor home in Algona. Mr and Mrs Jim Steven and family were Sunday dinner guests at the Jay Steven home. Bernadine Steven came home Saturday to spend the weekend. Mr and Mrs Fern Caulkins of Fairmont, North Dakota, spent .Sunday night at. the Roy Mann 'home. Roy and Fern are cousins. Mr and Mrs Caulkins are on their way to West Palm Beach, where they will spend the winter. Learning to live, like learning arithmetic, Isn't done by getting someone else to work out ah your problems for you. lems for you. BLAST The Rollin Koeher home near Frederieksburg was damaged by a gas explosion, during the family's absence. Bottled gas was blamed. The 'explosion moved the house off its foundations and pushed one wall out about two feet. The family dog was burned by the blast. TJDM Classifieds Pay Dividends Tuesday, December 11, 1956 Alflono (la.) Upper De« Mdln«-l tween 1:30 and 3:30 p.m., to avoid the peak hour rushes. Janet Peters was honored guest at a going away party last week at the home of Mrs Russell Smith. Girl Scout Troop I were hostesses, and presented a gift to Janet. Games were played and lunch was served, by Mrs Smith assisted by Mrs Harold Opsal, leader. Mrs Eva Hanson, mother of Mrs G. D. Baker, returned Sunday to the Baker home, after having visited her children at Mar- 13 COLORS 13 RUSCO WINDOWS SALVANIZED STEEL SELF- STORING COMBINATION givei fou more convenience and comfort than any other combinaiiot window I XUSCO DOOR HOODS AND WINDOW CANOPIES add greatly to the beauty of your home I Charles Miller RUSCO SALES Phone 741-W after C pjn. Display «t 116 So. Dodge, Algoni for dozens of fast cheese treats Postal Rush Of Xrnas Mail Is Underway Posttnnsler W. W. Sullivan said today that the mounting volume of Christmas mail makes it vitally important for CVITVOIU? to hflp on his "Mail Enily For Christmas" program. lie reports that the flow of Christmas cards is tunning about llio same as last. year, but mailing of gifts by Parcel Post is definitely behind schedule, and ho urged that all out-of-state parcels be sent by Air Parcel Post from now on. "Most people realize that the early arrival of a Chirstmas carO or gift is always welcomed", the Postmaster pointed out. "But there are still some who have the mistaken idea that a gift or card arriving on Christmas Eve has ; special significance!. Actually, i is the thought behind the gift or card and not the time of arrival that is the important consideration." Every facility of the Post Office is being pressed into maximum service, extra trucks and personnel have been added with the goal of clearing all Christmas mail well before Christmas Day In summing up the present situation, the Postmaster said. "Try to bring your parcels and Christmas cards to the postal windows before 10:00 a.m., or be- The average age of the representatives in the 84th congress is 51.3 years. • C SPOON IT into hot foods HEAT IT for cheese sauce SPREAD IT for snacks A PASTEURIZER PROCESS CHEESE SPREAD Tabl* modal phon* — choo«« from 8 decorator color* EXTENSION PHONES IN V\\\\\ll|lll||l//////f^ wmk What a thoughtful gift for someone you love ... so handy ... so handsome , , , ao useful every day of the year! Mom will thank you for the convenience of her kitchen extension — in her favorite color! Sister will be thrilled with her smart bedroom phone for those "personal" calls. Dad, too, will like his own extension phone in his workshop or den. You can give extension phones to friends or relatives wherever they may be living and arrange to have the modest charges billed to you. We'll be glad to gift-wrap your phone, and installation can be made before or after Christmas, as you wish. Call your telephone business office now for details. Northwestern Bell Telephone Company fOR GIFTS womnnn >* MTONO mrw mid Pemeys irwur Santa/ GIVE\\ GAYMODE" Packed With Plenty of Value! Stretchable NYLONS 98c Self and Dark Seams - N. M. I. ___ Long-Wearing SHEER STRETCHABLE NYLONS Double-Loop Construction pr. 1.25 60 GAUGE 15 DENIER GAYMODES Siies 8V* - 11 98c SEMI - SERVICE WEIGHT NYLONS Two-Way Stretch Q0f% Top. 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Plus NEW PENNEY SHIRT FEATURES 7-POINT CONTOUR TAILORINGI Penney's joins luxury'Pima cotton with exclusive new design in an all-new Towncraft built for perpetual comfort and good grooming...a dress shirt built the way you are I e French and Barrel Cuff Listen To KLGA 1600 ON YOUR DIAl Every Day At 11:59 a.m. For A Message From BJUSTROM'S FURNITURE Following Algona Newt At 11:55 a.m. Per Week WILL BUY ANY OF THESE ITEMS 11 Shopping Days till Xma$ ! Shop Ptnney'i and Save! AT BEECHER'S * * * Sunbeam Hair Dryer Electric Shaver Iron Auto. Egg Cooker Portable Mixer Mixmaster Auto. Percolator Electric Blanket Coffeemaster Electric Tools Deep Fryer Frying. Pan Westinghouse Frying Pan Deep Fryer Elec. Griddle Sandwich Grill Iron Elec. Mixer Warming Pad Auto. Percolator Portable and Table RADIOS The biggest selection you'll find for miles and miles - All colors, styles, shapes to satisfy everyone. Famous brand names — Westinghouse, Admiral, Arvin, Sylvania, Philco, Stromberg- Carlson, Capehart and Motoro- RECORD PL A YERS All Speeds - All Prices By Crescent, Columbia and Symphonic. Electric Clocks In All Siies, Colors and Shapes, plastic, metal, and ceramic- »y General llectric or Sessions. KM Electric CORN POPPERS TV LAMPS * * * We're Set To Trade For Anything, Too BEECHER LAN! APPLIANCES "The Wildest Trader In Town" Phone 771

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