The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah on October 6, 1971 · Page 10
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The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah · Page 10

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Ogden, Utah
Issue Date:
Wednesday, October 6, 1971
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Page 10
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10A Ogden Standard-Examiner, Wednesday, October 6, 1971 POLLY'S POINTERS Pefss Along Those Aids on Curtain Lengths sticky ' if wrappers crochet'hook. LESS STICKY have found they less I, put into a several cut .plastic bag, By;POLLY-.CRAMER .plastic..bread wrapper rugs as, DEAR,: POLLY-I would *!'_'P ! ?,t t i c .,. Would stick " ;to the appreciate it if •someone would tell 'me how jto launder curtains so they stay -the "same length. I >ut mine on" curtain stretchers jut still the sides: do not hang evenly. Thanks—Mrs.-B.D.H. DEAR POLLY—Never throw away the cuffs of wo-rnout ankle socks- but'cut them off and use as wristlets when shampooing your hair or washing woodwork. No more sudsy water running to your elbows.—Elizabeth DEAR POLLY—The elderly who like to cook but- sometimes CARD-CARRYING gamesters would enjoy staying home to play in this recreation room. And the keeper of the house would enjoy the easy maintenance of the Armstrong flooring and the sound-absorbability of the acoustical ceiling. FOR YOUNG NATURALISTS i Why Hot a Crash Pod of Home Wh ere Teen Can Do Own Thing? By CAROLYN S. MURRAY There's a decided movement toward home-oriented recreation, and part of the credit could go to advocates of the natural life. We usually label these advocates as hippies and longhairs, but in addition .to the young naturalists who dress in an unconventional way, there are dozens and hundreds of equally young idealists who reject the plastic world of the expense- account adults. The drinks-before-d i n n e r, wine-through-dinner and super- heavy meals prepared with arti- j ficial preservatives really doi turn this generation off. and its) the wise parent who realizes this | and makes an effort to give these youngsters some alternatives. The home-based alternatives are many. HEART OF SPACE 'Why not devise a crash pad right at home where your teenagers and college students can function at an independent! level? A mini-kitchen with sink and essential plug-in appliances would be an asset. This cook center needn't take up more space than a closet, or it could be the heart of the space. An underdeveloped basement room or garage could be fitted with a few wilder mattresses. The youngsters will find interesting fabrics or some Indian rugs, posters and even paintings to their liking. We so seldom! give young adults control over their environments, it's a sur-j prise to find out how knowledgeable they are about comfort and good design. If you'd like to set a pattern of home-based recreation for some of the younger children and for adults in the family, try planning a room around a particular theme. The one illustrated today leans heavily on playing card motifs and actually uses some old decks of cards as an unusual border trim just below the ceiling. The ceiling tiles give good acoustical qualities'to the room: flooring lightens the workload the day after! But the theme could be outer space, model airplanes, racing cars, photography, music-making, travel or family memorabilia. Remember to provide good lighting for-the various kinds of I ing, rap sessions, dancing. activity. A badly lighted room will' drive potential users away quicker Uian any other factor. Good lighting is not necessarily bright light; it means the right lightfor the moment whether it iometimes, use offbeat light, such as a series of projected images playing on a plain wall or ceiling. The family slide projector works beautifully for such alight in motion effect. Set it on be card playing, television view- automatic and let it rip! forget an ingredient might try my method. Consult the recipe, get out everything needed and put on the counter where you are working. NOTHING FORGOTTEN As an ingredient is used immediately return that one thing to its proper place and when you are finished each container is back in place and nothing has been forgotten.— Forgetful DEAR GIRLS—I am sure you will agree that this is a mistake not confined to the elderly. Nothing' can be more exasperating then putting a cake in the oven and remembering something that had not been added. I once forgot the baking powder in a birthday j cake.—Polly DEAR POLLY—When -the blades on my food mixer broke, my husband put one beater in his drill and used it to stir, paint. This did a beautiful job! and saved time and patience, too.—Mrs. C.J.K. j DEAR POLLY—Margaret said she had trouble crocheting sprinkle a bit.of talcum powder, over them, close the 'bag and swoosh them before crocheting.—D.M.S. D E A : R POLLY-Margaret wanted to know. how to clean the hook she is using to crochet plastic, bread wrappers. Every so often, .1 lightly sand my wooden hook with fine sandpaper. I find a wooden hook is far better-to use for this than a plastic one.—Mrs.jR.K. DEAR POLLY—Our cat wet our built-in broadloom and a friend suggested washing the area with an-ammonia solution which I did and it improved things but some odor. persists. Is there any other remedy or shall I keep on using the ammonia solution? Also I would like a recommendation for removing .underarm perspiration odors-from woolen suits. Is there a one-shot remedy or is this a matter of keeping at it?—Mrs. J.T. DEAR POLLY-If customers pushed grocery carts left in [the number of rolls of wallpaper parking lots back to the store (needed for a room on the back when they go shopping, many a nicked car would .be avoided of a picture hung in the newly papered room. Will be a time- and carts would always ' be 'saver when it needs redoing.— available.—Marge Bessie DEAR POLLY and Mrs. L.V.B.—An easy way to remove the silver backing from an old and damaged mirror so the glass can. be used as a tabletpp is to apply salt moistened with vinegar. Let it stand awhile and the silver comes right off when rubed with an old soft' cloth. T:ME SAVER Girls, don't forget to record DEAR READERS—I found repeating the application of salt and vinegar helped in removing the silver and mine required the use of a small sharp knife for careful scraping off.—Polly You. will rsctivi < doltir If Petty uses your f«verif§ homemikliig MM, Pit Peeve, Polly's Problem er wlu- lion to > problem. Writ* Polly In e«r« of this newspaper. ESA GROUP WILL MEET Alpha Beta Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Alpha will meet tonight at 7:30 at the home of Mrs. Arthur Chrisman, 1741 W. 4800 S., Roy. Mrs. Wayne Richins. membership chairman, will be in charge of the social to introduce prospective members to ESA. She will be assisted by Mrs. Alice Peery and Mrs. Raymond Pfeifer. 'onsumer's (orner* Presented in your interest each week by KUTV and Cream o"Weber Dairy By Carolyn Dunn, KUTV Consumer Marketing Specialist -, When you tny floor, particularly in th« 10-pound, bag, look for th« addition of special nutrition infonnation. One of the leading flour manufacturers is »ow including a Basic 4 Menu planning guide in simple, easy-to-follow form to assist consumers with the important task-of balancing family m«al* daily. You may have to acquire a taste for these unusual products, especially if you eat them as srJacks. The manufacturer recommends that we add them to numerous recipes from appetizer* to vegetable dishes, and even baked products such as biscuits. No refrigeration is necessary forliiese un-roeatables. These two new products on the market taste like a spicy pepperoni and * milk sausage ... they are certainly protein products like dried meat bits, but they are just reasonable f acsimtlies, not meat. Like the familiar bacon . bits that have been on grocer's shejves for some time, they are really Textured vegetable products. Protein is extracted from vegetables {such as soybeans, wheat) and spun into fibers. Other ingredients are added and further processed to obtain the desired texture, color and flavor. £«ting Patterns Form Early Why are some people eating aH the time? Tfi'ey are probably following a family pattern they grew up with, Sna eking has a place, if it doesn't crowd out neds, and if it keeps certain limitations. When you are thinking of snack, especially for small children, think of mUlc, small pieces of fruit, cat-up raw vegetables, cheese cnbes, crackers spread with cottage cheese or peanut butter, and cereals. These snacks carry their weight in food value. To assure.good eating patterns later on, it is probably wise for mothers to keep fairly close watch on family snack habits. Expect a considerable drop in the food budget when macks are more carefully controlled. V50A ?!««$•!*•* Lilt fwOefefer Apples Applesauce Apple juice Pork Fresh pears . Canned, pears Potatoes Eggs Utah's major apple crop, the Jonathan is in Ml swing. This versatile apple can be used for most apple uses. Smaller supplies of Red and Golden DeBcioos, and a few Green- ings are appearing now. (Makes 6 servings) Rich pJc pastry to line 9-inch deep torte or cake pan 6 apples, peeled, cored and thinly sliced Juice of 1 Jemon 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 2 tablespoons butter 1 8-ounce package (or 1 cop) cream cheese % cup honey V* cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon me.lte'd butter Use pastry to line a 9-inch deep torf,e or.cake pan; or use pastry.to line two 5-Inch tart pans; or use pastry to line six smaller tart pans. Roll pastry out, cut and place in buttered baking pan or small pans. Crimp pastry edge, trim and set in refrigerator to chill. Next peel, core and thinly slice 6 apples. Sprinkle with juice of t lemon and sugar. Cook in butter about 8 minutes or until apples are almost soft. Let cool a few minutes. Preheat oven at 375-degrees F. Mix cream cheese with honey, cream and butter. Blend together until smooth. Add a little more cream if needed. Spread this cheese mixture thickly in bottom of chilled -pastry-lined pans. Spread thinly around onto the side pastry in pans. Fill with cooked apples. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until- pastry in lightly browned. Serve warm or cold. Make the most of your food budget by buying plentiful foods listed every Sunday in. this column. presents VThe Carolyn Dunn Show" Mondays thru Fridays'at 10:55 a.m. on KUTV (Ch. 2) WAMSUTTA SUPERCALE SHEETS Frriest quality smooth cotton percale sheets in yellow, gold or green scallops on white. At prices like these, you'll want to stock up on all sizes and colors for your family. reg, reg. reg. 8.45 full flat or fitted 4.49 reg. 11.45 queen flat or fitted .....5.99 reg. 14.45 king flat or fitted ..... .6.99 4.40 pr. standard cases pr. 2.99 4.90 pr. king cases pi". 3.49 reg. 7.45 twin flat or fitted 3.49 ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-all itor.i save on tea sets reg. 6.99 3.49 So many pretty patterns and colors to choose from in these five-piece tea sets. Cloth measures 45x45; includes 4 napkins. ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-all «lor.i « place mat sets, too reg. 6.99 3.49 Dress up your table with four pretty place mats and four matching napkins. No-iron prints and assorted fabrics. Great for gifts. ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-all iteroi table cloth sets reg.. 5.99 2.99 Solid color table linens in just the loveliest col-ors ever. Cloth measures 52x52 with four matching napkins. • ' •' .' ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-all ttorti fieldcrest blankets reg. 12.99 6.99 Beautiful "Affection" in winter-weight fabrics. Colors of pink, blue, gold or green— and they're already gift boxed. ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-olI «tor« quilted bedspreads You'd expect to pay so much more for these elegant quilted-to-the-floor spreads. Savings are the greatest; so hurry in to .enjoy them— while you dress up-your bedrooms. reg. $50 twin' size $27 reg. $60 full size $32 reg, $70 queen size i....... $37 reg. $80 dual king size ..!... .$39 ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS—oil Hor»i wj*ff* • towels that you know . . . because they're showing the most famous labels. Be early to.choose, prettiest fashion colors to dress up your bath. reg. $5 bath towel '.'.... 1.99 reri. 2.50 hand towel •...... .. 1.50 reg. - 95c wash cloth 99c ZCMI FASHION DOMESTICS-all •term

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