The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah on October 6, 1971 · Page 8
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The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah · Page 8

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Location:
Ogden, Utah
Issue Date:
Wednesday, October 6, 1971
Page:
Page 8
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&EAR ABBY Husband Favors a foreign £By ABIGAIL VAN BUREN iflEAR ABBY: Our 27-year- old : son found a Japanese girl iti." Tokyo that he liked a lot so Be ;invited her tft -come here and! spend a few-weeks with us. We are Finish.- .--When we t0ok her to the airport to bid h£r I goo d b y e, iny'husband Abby gave her a big kiss. I told him I ^didn't think that was called for, i and he said it was just in appreciation for her'sukiyaka. I still! don't think my husband should have kissed her that way and we had a few strong words about it. Was I wrong to have complained?—SEATTLE DEAR SEATTLE: Yes. But now that you know how much your husband likes sukiyaM,. it might inspire you to improve the quality of your own. DEAR ABBY: My problem is my husband. He spills food on the floor and never cleans it up. He eats in bed and gets crumbs in the sheets. He uses things and never puts them back in place. He leaves his dirty clothes in every room of the house. He drops -cigaret ashes on the floor and burns holes in ais clothes, my clothes, the furniture, bedspreads, etc. . He belches, at home and in public and-never says, "Excuse me," I work away from--home and still have my housework to do in the evenings' and he won't give me a hand. I have had three mis-carriages in the past 5 years. Right now I am four months pregnant and feel rotten, but my husband won't even carry out the trash. We live in an upstairs duplex apartment and sometimes I have to make three and four trips to get all the garbage and JACQBY ON BRIDGE Standard-Examiner, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1971 *•• . Question: Who'll Answer •-*: « . ft Dear Old Mom Cant? "; By BETTY CANARY As I have, always told my children, asking questions is O.K. with me just as long as I don't have to answer all of them. --What I mean to say is, I don't mind giving them my views on jwlitics, religion, sex, work and recreation. But who doesn't •ee that every rosy-cheeked child is a thorn-in-the-side when i£'. comes to asking the unanswerable? lEvery parent has a personal list. Questions I have given up answering include: -."How many packages of flower seeds will you buy fromj a concentration camp?" *"" ' you new racing bike?" "Have you seen my turtle?" "Do I have to wear boots?" NOT AGAIN; "But why did I have to have so many brothers and sisters?" "Is it tuna salad for lunch again?" "Why do I have to live on this side of town and walk to school when all my friends get to ride the school bus?" "Why do I have to live on this side of town and ride the school bus when all my friends get to walk to school?" "What is this place anyway— trash out. He spends about $5 a week on magazines with dirty pictures in them when we need every penny we can • save. I am 23 and he is 29. When I complain or ask for a .little cooperation-he says I'm being a "perfectionist." Abby, I don't think I can take it anymore. Can you tell me what to do?— Sandy DEAR SANDY: Clear out while you still have your sanity and youth. DEAR ABBY: I grew up in a small town where everyone said hello to everyone else when they passed them on the street, NORTH C .- . A 4 ' VAJ5 - .'- . + AJS8743 +76 "'•;•. WEST EAST AQ92 AK8763 VQ83 V9762 4Q652 -4 Void + K8S : +J109*". SOUTH (D) AAJ105 V-K104 •f K10 + AQ32 North-South vulnerable West North. East South 1N.T. Pass 2 # Pass 2 <K Pass 34 Pass 3'N.T. Pass Pass Pass Opening lead—V 3 Trick Back With Interest In basic standard American or JACOBY MODERN ' the response of three, of a .minor suit to a one no-trump opening suggests a ' slam. Advanced Didders usually prefer : to respond with a Stayman two- club call and then bid the minor to invite the slam. . Therefore, South knew that North was interested.in a slain. In spite of holding a -maximum no-trump, South signed off at three no-trump because he'only whether they knew them or not. I held two diamonds. Now I am married and am GOOD DIVISION living in a-much larger city, but! GOOD DIV15IUN I still have the habit of speaking to strangers I meet in stores, restaurants and on the street. My husband is a very jealous North didn't like no-trump, but since his partner had shown four spades he decided to let the hand play there. It was a good decision. South had 10 sure man, and he considers my ... ,,,,. 1. ,. ,_friendliness to be flirting. ll tac ^. and the heart £ ave hun don't speak only to attractive ai Lr young men, I chat with young rvomen my own age and also with older people. SHE'LL CHANGE Do you think I should wait to )e introduced before speaking o someone? It won't be easy to break the habit, but if you tell me to change, I'll try.—Friendly in Florida DEAR FRIENDLY: There is no harm in being "friendly" to other young women and older I sell 80 000 packets of mother? Didn't I tell you I put *an flower and vegetable seeds how- the telepone bm unde r the flourl from fcles will I be able toi«,, ni<: t or ,.. oiks, but nitisting when it comes to conversations with many bicycles win?" ^ "Don't you want me to get a j ca ni st er? young men, the advice ere is to cool it. CONFIDENTIAL TO "LADY The game was IMP team and it turned out to quite-a swing. North played five diamonds at the other .table. Ajspade was opened. He went right up with South's ace. Later on he 'had to lose a trump and the club' finesse. Then he misguessed the queen of hearts and managed to be set one trick. NO INTEREST There is no interest to play at three no-trump, the but there is to five diamonds. North could have practically insured his contract by playing the 10 of spades from dummy at trick one. This would present spade «. W ? V,-., ^ 6T /,? U C T lgl DREAMER IN WHEELING." "„,; Lt L L mother? Didn't I tell you about There is notning .. wrong ., with Y^ 1 ^ rno 'urrtrmc I \vac? tA&-mn«- -fAT* i - - , .. ™. * i LUdL U.lLri trick to the opponents but West jthe worms I was keeping for having fantasies . Those who j ™ biologr class?" . build S, dre cas ttes" aren't in! th • , t0 g l v f *Jn t e rest later m ''Why are you crying, mother? Didn't I tell you about my new jacket? How it was an accident the way the battery acid ate through "it? Oh. And I didn't tell you about the sweater either, did'l?" ''Why are you crying, mother?'' any trouble until they try to live in "them. What's your problem? You'll fed better if you get it off your chest. Write to Abby. Box 69700, Us Angeles, Calif. 90069. For « personal reply enclose stamped, addressed envelope. For Abby'j new booklet, "What Teen- Aqers Want to Know," send SI to Abby, Box 69700, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069. CONSTIPATED O DUE TO LACK OF FOOD * BULK IN YOUR DIET • BRAN BUDS * MRS. WAYNE McKENZIE I Roy Auxiliary Announces New Officers *• K O Y — M r s . Wayne L. McKenzie has been installed president of the American Legion Auxiliary, Roy Unit 139 for -1971-72. -The following officers were #so installed: Mrs. Julie Richesson, first vice president; Mrs. Robert W. Yarrington, second vice president; Mrs. Slaine Swapp. secretary- treasurer and Mrs. Pauline Douglas, historian. '"'Others are: Mrs. Robert Rintoul, chaplain; Mrs. Arva Corlett, sergeant-at-arms; and Mrs. Milford Smith, Mrs. Robert Ipson, and Mrs. Keith Gvsolliam, members of the executive committee. 1- Mrs. McKenzie will preside at the' next Unit meeting on ^Tuesday at 8 p.m. at Paul's •Blfle Ox in Roy. «The 1971 Girls' State ^representatives from Roy and iWeber High Schools will give ieports, Mrs. Frank R. Chase is Girls' State chairman. J The public is invited. 0-0 Sigma ESA Meets Tonight '.-Alpha Sigma Chapter of ^psHon Sigma Alpha will "meet .-tonight at 7:30 at the Utah •Power and Light Co. «•• The guest speaker will be iBehnie Williams, who will talk •pn- "Abuse and Control of Drugs JToday." »' New officers for the 1971-72 ^year are Mrs. Richard JCristofferson. president; Mrs. •Don Child, vice president; Mrs. Jtichard Larsen, secretary: ?!Krs. Max Ewing, treasurer, 3vlrs Bud Graham, hisior'sn rand parliamentarian; Mrs. •James Gunderson. welfare iMrs'. Robert Whittiker, ways 'and means and Mrs. Dean Hopkins, disaster chairman. Refreshments will be served. Put it oa don't put it of f Although fall fertilization means you can generally apply material anytime between late August and late November, favorable fall weather has been known to end as early as October. So the recommendation "put it on, don't put it off" has a lot of merit. If you don't fertilize this fall, it means you have to next spring when there's so much other work that will need your attention. j Be sure to contact your local USS fertilizer Hf^ ^^"-^-"••fm*.-" f:. dealer now! .<"<¥;_, id'"'*;" ; U$S) Fertilizers famous brand women s ski parkas reg. $26 T5.88 Just right styling for skiing or any kind: of winter fun. And a special pre-season. factory purchase makes this famous brand parka an outstanding bargain. ZCMl SPORTING GOODS-all aarn ZCMl STATIONERY-all ifor.t electric portable reg. 179.50 149.50 Smith Corona Electra 120 with 12" carriage, office-style keyboard, tabulator, five repeat actions, elite type and carrying case. Eiectra 220, reg. $238, with all the above features plus electric carriage return. 199.50 Royal electric adding machine for home or office. Adds ten columns, totals 11; credit balance, 2-color ribbon, all metal parts. List price 119.50 59,95 deluxe sleeping bags Comfy's famous Blue Valley super deluxe bag. Four pound new Dacron 88® polyester fill, heavy duty cover and zipper; in rich blue. reg. $24 18.88 ZCMl SPORTING GOODS—oil itor.i first quality luggage reg. 22.50 to 62.50 14.88 to 42.88 Fashion colors and styles in these sizes: for women, tote bags, 21" overnight or 26" pullman; for men, 21" companions, 3-suHe: - s. ZCMl I.UGGAGE-oll quality ski pants reg. $36 14.88 Famous brand ladies' ski pants feature "New Dimension" over-the-boot styling.-,^ ,thevlast word in ski fashion. Available !ihT"in}i" r only. Hurry. They'll go fast. ZCMl SPORTING GOODS—alt (torn

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