The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois on July 14, 1914 · Page 6
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The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois · Page 6

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Page Six T H E D E C A T U R R E V I E W Tuesday Evening, July 14,-1314. THE DAILY REVIEW. PDBU8HXD BVKRT PAT. a t the Deeirar. TIllDOI* Pcntoff'ce «· weond-cluc m*tt*r. The Review Publishing Co. DKCATCR. ILUNOIB. Office In R«»ie«r Building, cortur of Ifelo ud North «treet«. AdvcrtUtnc ntt* mad* knowo on «ppll- Mtlon *t tb!» offlci. TERMS OF SDBECRnTION. OB* yew (In «dv»nc« |5.X Ox month* (In »«T»I») 150 three months (In adTanc*),. LH Per week · .10 The Review doe« not knowlnrfy accept false or fraudulent «avertl»lnlt. or other advertising of an objectionable nature Every advertisement In IM columns Is printed w th full confidence In the character and reliability of the advertiser and the truth of the representationa made. Reader, of The Review will confer a favor If they will oromptly report anv failure on the part of on advertiser to make (too* any representation contained In Review advertisement. Errata*. Jnly J*. !«*· Subscribers leaving the city for the summer may have The Review mailed to them dally without additional charge. Address changed as often a« necessary, but both old and new should be Riven. WotlfT by phone or postal oard. THE REVIEW PUB. CO. deal of a row to hoe. Over on that| side of that water he IB asked to do all the work alone. And In addition he Is called on to build a ship staunch enough to cross the Atlantic; for under the rules It can't be hauled over and put together here. He might have his designs m a d e III England and b u i l d the ship In Canada, sending over workmen to do the turn, but this would not satisfy him. He wants to "lift the cup" entirely as a British sporting venture. And Sir Thomas I/lpton Is handicapped in the mere matter of numbers. He Is the only man In Great Britain and Ireland to build a yacht to contest In these races. On this side of the water we have at least three sets of men, each of whom builds a boat. Then these three boats are taken out and tried against each other, the one. showing best being named to meet the Upton craft. Thus we have three chances to his one to win the big race., And this takes no account of the need of building a ship that will cross the ocean. TVe can race with craft that mlgrht not be able at all t n make the crossing. All of which should only cause us to have just a little more admiration for the splendid nerve displayed by Sir Thomas Llpton. He keeps on t r y l n K against about all the odds that can he crowded Into the game. nla, climate and announces that he will make UB a visit not la'er than August. We expect to furnish Min variety when be landi. ; OTTT THB AJfGEM. Itey day this time of year a reader OM pick HJ hi* dally paper and learn at «jom«boay kllltd In an automobile at a nJJr»«d erMSlng. When one gets to l.mrn ·omethlrijT »bout the facts, the weodar 1« that »ach accidents are not Altogether more numerous. 1h* tro«bl« IB that a great many of cars pay little attention whea they com* to railroad crossings. A abort while since one of the tig r»ll- running Into th» west took steps to father eom* figures »n this point. 'A »lty of «1ze was picked out In the ·tat* ef Kansas, a place where people at* »11 officially sober and where all mtt thought to exercise reasonable care and caution. The railroad stationed two of Us men at an Important cross- ted In that town, with Instructions to make note of passing automobiles and to comment on the way drivers handled themselves. This test was kept up for several days. In all something like 4.000 cars made the crossing. And when th» returns we-e counted and m a d e up It was found that just 2 per cert of the drivers brought their cars to a stop, or almost to a. stop, and looked both ways before crossing the tracks. In other words, only 2 per r-ent were 35 care- f u l as they should have been. It was discovered t h a t a m u c h larger number of drivers paid rot the least a t t e n t i o n to the crossing. They dashed over w i t h o u t slacking speed or l o o k l n e up or down t h e track. It was f o u n d that less t h a n half the drivers took reasonable caution In making the crossing. Perhaps It Is the same way with millions of crossings in other parts of the c o u n t r y . And these are made every day by millions of cars. There Is an old story t h a t angels guard foolish people w h o take long chances. In this m a t t e r we give the angels too m u c h tn do: we tire them out, wear them o u t . and then the Story gets transferred to the accident column in the daily papers. LIKE A GRAB BAG. · Reports from Springfield bring an estimate of 3.000 petitions to be filed tWs year by candidates in Cook county. cmndidates for office in that county. Th»»e petitions are nomination, papers and Indicate that 3,fi"0 names may appear on the county primary ballot in Cook. Out of »11 this list the voter will attempt to select twenty-nine names of those he wishes to become candidate* on the election day ballot. In other words, the Cook county primary voter is expected to run over a list of 8.060 names in order to select his candidates. But the job Isn't quite as ·bad ac here Indicated. On primary day the ».0«0 names will be divided among several p'arty tickets, for they have a full assortment of parties up that way. P»rhap« not more than 900 names will b» handed one voter from which to select his candidates. But what :· a. primary voter to do when handed 900 names snd told to select twenty-nine? In such case what can he do If handed 200 names? For the most part he can only shut his eyes, throw up his hands and try to go to it. It Is out of the question for him to exercise any real selection for most of the offices. The voter in Cook county Is not go- Ing to lay off to post himself on 900 names: he would refuse utterly make a study of even 100 names. He will know something about a few names for the most Important office that is on the ticket; and further than that he will know very little more than nothing. He can go ahead and guess at It, If he cares to mark somebody for every office In the list. And what about the quality of ticket* (elected In this way? Couldn't one get about as good a set by putting ail the tegs In a bag and having a blindfolded person draw twenty-cine names? Potatoes at »2 a bushel Is another calamity that should not have been ·Islted on people as good and ticserv- ing as we claim to be. But wheat bread, or the makings, is quoted away down. If It Is summer weather that Is sought at a summer resort, we wish to call attention to the more than a b u n d ant supply we cin. offer right here In the parched Garden Spot. A MAN OP GOOD PARTS. vT. C. Clifford has filed his p e t i t i o n with the secretary of state at Springfield to get his n a m e on t h p p r i m a r y ballot. He is a c a n d i d a t e for state treasurer and is r u n n i n g as a Democrat. Tip to d a t e hla Is the only petition that has been filed, though d o u b t less there will be others. Mr. Clifford was a neighbor of ours long before he went to Springfield. H= Is now assistant treasurer in the o f f i c e of State Treasurer William Ryan. All reports indicate t h a t Mr. C l i f f o r d is the mainstay of the o f f i c e ; also them is no question a b o u t the office being run in good style. Before going to S p r i n g f i e l d with Treasurer Ryan Mr. Clifford was pay- Ins teller a n d assistant cashier J n t h e First N a t i o n a l h a n k a t C h a m p a i g n , t h e Harris Kink He held t h a t p o s i t i o n for years a n d gave a good a r - r o u n t of himself. He Is n man a h o w t t h i r t y - f i v e years old. Mr C l i f f o r d of merit a n d t h a n on** of sh s m e n t i o n e d as a man o m p l i s h m e n t , r a t h e r He I s n ' t b u i l t at all ac t h e l i n e s of the t y p i c a l p o l i t i c i a n : he is never coiner tn monopolize the a t t e n t i o n of t h e s t a t e while he toots his nwn h n r n . Those who k n n w the m a n a n d a d m i r e h i ? q u a l i t i e s and a b i l i ties will have to do the p u b l i c i t y work for him, POWER OF KICKERS. President Wilson savs there Isn't any c o n f l i c t between himself and the senate over the m a t t e r of c o n f i r m i n g the a p p o i n t m e n t s of Messrs. Warburg and Jones a? members of the federal erve h o a r d . The d i f f i c u l t y Is t h a t one or two D e m o c r a t i c senators are k i c k i n g against the pricks: and as soon as their toes get sensitively sore the unpleasantness w i l l he over. Ts it possible t h a t one or two sen- a t o r s are holding up c o n f i r m a t i o n in this most I m p o r t a n t m a t t e r ? If a couple of kickers h a v e all this power for mischief, there ought to be some way for the department of Justice to get after them. We p r i v a t e s would not be permitted to stop the procession In this f a s h i o n . BROKE lip THE MEETING. Mayor Dinneen heard what factory people and others had to say about the need of more water main In the Chamber of Commerce addition, to all of which the mayor subscribed. And thereupon the mayor asked some of those present at the meeting to indicate where the money to do the work is to come from. And then what happened? The reporter says: "But of course no one was able to offer a suggestion." By way of diversion a caller and Commissioner Becker tried to take a fall out of each other, after which the meeting faded away. It seems that If there Isn't money it Is difficult to make headway. ' WHEK IS A 'WAR OVERT Sometimes in this country when we wish to be emphatic In a statement that a fellow citizen is falling behind the times we say: "ha doesn't know that the war Is over." And we refer to the civil war that was fought In 1861 to 18S5. But see those people over In Ireland. Orangemen and Nationalists. The battle of the Boyne was fought In 1690, just 224 years ago. Most of them seem to feel that battle yet remains to be foaght. It seems we recove.r from differences a good deal more quickly In this country. We have even forgotten the Spanish war, fought just a few years ago. Doctors have been Jieatd to say that hot weather In summer makes this section of country a wholesome sanitarium. If they are right about it, we ought to live to 100 years and should be entitled to special rates for ;ife Insurance, HE HASN'T MUCH SHOW. Many of us are reminded that Sir Thomas Lipton, the man who keeps on Arthur J. Gallagher has grown trying to "lift the cup," has a good of the monotony of southern Ca'ifor- If our bull team can induce rain storms we want it to hurry alons and come right home and stick around the rest of the season. HISTORY OF CIVIL WAR DAY BY DAY JULY 14. 1864. President Lincoln called for 500.000 ir.rn to report for d u t y at the f r o n t by ?ept. 5. The c o n f e d e r a t e a r m y lodged in and n b o u t Petersburg Inaugurated a series of offensive, operations on a s m a l l scale order t o I n t e r r u p t t h e u n i o n c a m - trn." if- the east and west. A f t e r the stirressfal raid i n t o M a r y l a n d , m n d e hy General Early and his riders. K e n t u c k y t e c a m e the objective p o i n t of a n u m b e r r f bodies o f cavalry w h i c h moved i n t o the state t h r o u g h Pound Gap. SEARCHED ADJUTANT WILLIAMSON FOR GUNS TEN YEARS AGO TODAY IN DECATUR In a. letter w r i t t e n to The Review from Belfast. Ireland. A d j u t a n t Thomas Williamson tells of an interesting session he had w i t h the customs o f f i - cials at Belfast Harbor. The letter follow^: "Belfast, Ireland, J u l y 3, 1914. "Editor R e v i e w . -"Yon w i l l see by above a d d r e s s I am now in "dear ould Ireland" the l a n d of th* brave and whore the great struggle for home r u l e is at the present t i m e a t t r a c t i n g a great deal of serioua a t t e n t i o n . I had a splendid t i m e in old London hut was glad when the t i m e r a m e for me to Bay good bye to It. MET BY SISTERS. "I a r r i v e d In B e l f a s t Tuesday morning, J u n e 30, and was met at the dock by my two sisters whom I had not seen for t h i r t y y e a i s. I can assure you it was a very p l e a s n n t m e e t i n g -- i t was some t i m e before we r e a l l y recognized each other. My oldest sister k n e w it was I by the shape of the back of my head. I asked her w h a t n e c u l i a r t h i n g or shape she could sf-f in my h e a d t h a t was so r e c o g n i z a b l e to her a f t e r so m a n y yea rp, of a b Fence a n d she i"Gp l i e d t h a t i t r e s e m b l e d m y brother's, and I m u s t add, my b r o t h e r had a most s p l e n d i d and well f o r m e d bead. " M y o t h e r sister d i d n o t r e a l i z e It was T u n t i l the n e x t d a y . HAD GOOD TRIP. "1 had a very good t r i p from London here. I took the I r a i n f r o m the Pt. P a n c r n s s t a t i o n M o n d a y at 6 p. m., ar- nvprt i n l l e y s b a m a t 1 1 : 5 2 a n d i m m e d i a t e l y got n n hoard t h e s t e a m s h i p f o r T ? * » l f a « L T h e sea t r e a t e d m e w H I n c n l n mid I B l ^ p t \v«ll u n t i l I r e a c h e d Belfast H a r b o r . As soon a.« T came a s h o r e » n u m b e r of c u s t o m h o u s e i n s p e c t o r s b o m h i r r l e d me a n d T was t a k e n to one side I n p p a r c h m y s u i t r a s e a n d t r u n k s , JUi/v 14, IBM. The total r a i n f a l l for the day w a ^ : n j . There was a big storm \ \ h l c l i did m i c h d a m a g e , blowing down tonts a t rp c h a u t a u q u a . " t w i s t i n g a houst- a r o u n d on its f o u n d a t i o n and T d l l i n K P a u l Crocker near Jlaroa. The team to represent D e c a t u r a t the »olf t o u r n a m e n t in J a c k s o n v i l l e was - M. L u t i n g , Dr. Will Chenoweth, ·harleo a M d F r i n k Powers, TV. L H a m - mer and H. H. Crea. Five Bier Four passengrer t r a i n s were detoured t h r o u g h Decatur because of a bad washout between Pans, and Litchfield. T h ? f a m i l y o f George Powers r r t u r n d f r o m Europe where they had been i v l n g for three years. The r a i n r o u s e d the r i v e r to rise a foot and a h a l f . S l u e b e r r i P S were selling at 15 c e n t s a q u a r t and sweet rorn sold at 15 c e n t s dozen. The corn crop in c e n t r a l I l l i n o i s was m u c h I m p r o v e d bv t h e r a i n a n d good w e a t h e r f o r t h e past t e n days. Of Local D. O. K. K,--Class to be Organized. "I a s k e d the o f f i c e r who was t o s s i n g t h r o u g h m y r o l M r s a n d s h i r t s w h a t h e was s e n r c h i f i E r f o r a n d h e s a i d , ' G u n s sir.* "T l a u g h e d a t h i m savins 1 t h a t I w o u l d give h i m a p r e s e n t for e v e r y gun he could f i n d . I h a d a box of t r i n k e t s I got in L o n d o n fop my c h i l d r e n w r a p p e d u p i n In-ou-n paper. and h e w a n t e d t o k n n w w h a t I h a d In t h e r e . I told him n r u b b e r b a l l , a r u b - b e r m a n . a toy h a n k , a toy dn^ n nd a h n \ nf R e e o h a m s p i l l s , "He said. 'No guns?' 'No guns,' I repeated. BO the investigation ended and I got my trunk locked up and w i t h my sisters I started to their home. "I must sav that I am b e g i n n i n g to long to be in America again, a l t h o u g h I am well treated e v e r y w h e r e . The scenery here on the C o u n t y A n t r i m and the County Down coast is lovely and the hills around the c i t y are b e a u - t i f u l but America is the best of all. I expect to visit New Castle and Castlewellan towns where I l i v e d when a boy and also see the old h o m e once more where 1 was born. "I w i l l also v i s i t th** c e m e t e r y a n d see the graves of my d e a r m o t h e r and b r o t h e r s and s i s t e r s and a f t e r t h a t I w i l l v i s i t Mrs. "Williamson's brothers and sisters in E n g l a n d on my way to London w h e r e I w i l l s h i p for New York. DOING SAME WORK. "I suppose the a c c o u n t of th* 1 great congress m e e t i n p = in T.ondon h n v e , been we. 11 T P p n r t e d In all t h e A m e r i c a n n e w s p a p e r ? - Th* s pp m e e t i n g s w e r e i n deed v e r y i n s t r u c t i v e , u n l n u e n n d o f g r e a t blessinsr to a l l T l o o k e d u p o n t h e Z u l u s , t h e A f r i c a n s , t h e Hindoo?, the Icelandei-s. N o r w e g i a n s , n u s ^ i a n s . R e d s k i n n e d I n d i a n s . C h i n e ? p. Jn panes* 5 , I t a l i a n s , Fwiss. G n r m n n s . F r e n c h , A u s - t r i a n ^ , .Ta vas, .Koreans. D u t c h , A us' rn I f a n s -- a l l of w h i c h were dressed in f h p f r n a t i v e c o s t u m e s a n d y e t a l l were C h r i s t i a n s a n d pond p n l v n t i o n i s t s a n d doins? t h e .cam** w n r k i n t h e i r c o u n t r i e s t h a t t h e A r m y i s d o i n g In A m e r i c a a n d E n g l a n d . " M a n v o f t b e p e p r . » j i ] f ? p o k e o n l v in t l m i r o w n l a n g u a g e b u f h a d t h e i r i n - t f r p r p t e r K T h e wea I b ^ r b n r p J p verv cool and d a m p . T m t , ? t P T - T l i k e the A m e r i c a n c l i m a t e h*- = t. 1 a m in splen- d i d h e a l t h a n d * b n j o \ i n i r m y I r i s h v i s i t among m v f r i e n d s a n d r e l a t i v e ^ v*ry well and T p x p p r t tn r p j e b r a t e the Glor i o u s F o u r t h i n real A m e r i c a n style. Tell my f r i e n d s I am well and hope t h e y a r e a l l well also. K i n d e s t r e - ga'-ds. T o u r s i f f r - c f i o n n t e l v , " T H O M A S W T L T . T A V ? O N . " A d j u t a n t . " nidtrewwfntt VVnste. T H - 3 i t s -- J o c k -- "You've won tb* f i r s t p r i z e i n t h e r a f f l e , \-"t y o u ' r r m i s - r r f l h l e . " ?amiy --"Yes; if w e r e J i s t ma luck. b u y i n e r t w n t i c k e t ? w h e n one w a d ha' don* 5 . It wore j i f f s i x p e n c e wasted." FRESH FRUIT DESSERTS FRUIT SAGO. Press the Juice from berries which ar^ thoroughly ripe, currants, raspberries or strawberries, either one k i n d or a r o m h l n a t l o n . To each cup of j u t c c allow one t a b l e s p o o n f til of sago. Sweeten to taste and cnok in the double boiler. Pour into molds, wet in cold water and f h i l l . A c o m b i n a t i o n in equal q u a n t i t i e s of the t h r e e f r u i t s mentioned gives a very a g r e e a b l e flavor. COLD BLUEBERRY PUDDING. This is a r m i p p whi'-h I like to pub- l i s h e v p r y s u m m e r , i n b l u e b e r r y time, br-rauso it m a k e s a v e r y excellent dessert, one t h a t Is v e r y easv to make as wo 11 a= economical, since left over broad ran be used for it. To a quart of b l n e l j e r r i e s a d d t h r e e - q u a r t e r s of a r u p f u l of p - i g a r and h n l f a c u p f u l of w a t e r . linil t h e m f i v e m i n u t e s . Toast f o u r or f i v e slices of bread, then but- tpr t h e m tr^norously. P u t enough i n t o the b o t t o m of ft h o w l of b a k i n g dish to l i n e t h e d i s h . A l t e r n a t e t h e bread a n d b e r r i e s u n t i l all tlu- b r e a d is soaked w i t h b e r r y j u i c e . Then put a plate and a f l a t i r o n nn t h e top so that the pud- d i n g w l i n r n n i d ?Li-ve rrld w i t h o u t a n y s a u r e * i r rm k ·* n s i m p l e s u ^ a r s y r u p t l i i r k e n - ^ r i w i t h :i l i t t l e cornst;irfh and f l a v o r e d w i t h l ^ m o n . PTAI.K C A K E P U D D I N G . To n f i i p f u l of s t H l i * ^ a k e c r u m b s add Police Arrest Man on bash Train. Wa- The police r e c e i v e d a telegram from Chief rf Police W i l l i a m Young of St. Louis Monday n i g h t , a s k i n g them to a r r e s t and hold William W a l l e r , colored, v;ho was t h o u g h t to be on \Vabash t r a i n Xo. 18, and m i g l i t be r i d i n g the blind b.-iggaere i n t o Dncatur. He was des c r i b e d as being a b r n w n - s k i n n e d ne- ^rn, a b o u t t w e n t y - f o u r years old, 135 pounds, p e a r on l e f t c h e e k , a n d wearing a b l u e s h i r t , black trousers and gray cap. He is w a n t e d in St. Lnuis on a charge of m u r d e r . ANSWERS DESCRIPTION. C a p t a i n W h i t t » n a n d o f f i c e r s Meece, Kossieck, B r u m i t t ^ n d Ray went to (he r a i l r o a d y a r d s and ivhen No. IS olored two c u p f u l s of milk, sugar to taste »nd two beaten eggs. Add also, one cup.'o* f r e s h f r u i t . Bake In a pan of hot wa ter u n t i l the eggs set. A custard saucgjr Is nice with this. , t R A S P B E R R Y AND MACAROON '· | PUDDING. Butter the inside of a pudding disU and in the b o t t o m ' p u t a layer of crusli- ed macaroons. Over the macaroons put a layer of picked raspberries and con- t i n u e a l t e r n a t i n g u n t i l you have th* q u a n t i t y necessary for your family. Let the l a s t layer be composed of the macaroons. Beat up an egg w i t h half at r u p f u l of cream or milk and stir intoi t h i s a t a b l e s p o o n f u l of lemon flavoring:. Pour this gradually into the dish. If a. large q u a n t i t y of dessert is required use two or more eggs w i t h a corresponding a m o u n t of m i l k . Bake this in a moderate oven for about half an hour. LEMON PUDDING. Soak a c u p f u l of bread crumbs fon half an h o u r in two c u p f u l a of milk. T h e n add the grated r i n d of a lemon. haf a c u p f u l of sugar, the y o l k of on« eg. a pinch of salt and a generous teas p o o n f u l of b u t t e r . Bake in a modernist oven ,ind when p a r t l y cooled coat with. a m e r i n g u e m a d e w i t h the egg whita a n d a heaping t a b l e - s p o o n f u l of g r a n u l a t e d sugar. F l a v o r t h e m e r i n g u e w i t h v the l e m o n iuice. LA U R A _ man r i d i n g the "blind" and locked him t:p. He answered the description ' i n e v e r y way, except t h a t lie wore a hat! i n s t e a d of a cap. He said his name ur,s Chophes C o r n » I l u s and t h a t he was c n l y s i x t e e n years old, but he looks m u c h older and the police believe h« Is the man w a n t e d . St. Louis officer* were n o t i f i e d to send for h i m . SARGENT CHAPEL PICNIC PLANNED Will Be Held a« »l»on Park on ThiirM «ioy Afternoon. Plans h a v e been completed for t h « a n n u a l S u n d a y school picnic of Sargent Chape!. It will be held at N'e'.son, p a r k , east of the r i t y . T h u r s d a y a f t e r * nnon of t h i s week. The picnickers will l e a v e the church en South Broad., way s h i r t y after 1 o'clock on hay; wagons. V a r i o u s athletic events and --rmtests have been planned to entertain the crowd and supper will be served m the evening. 'There have been 125 per-. sons who have signified their i n t e r n tions of going. They will return .ta the c i t y at 8 o'clock. Shopping A Pleasure Here. Cool A class in the Dramatic Order of K n i g h t s of Khorassan. an a u x i l i a r y organization of the K. of P.. w i l l be org a n i z e d in Decatur on Aug. 22. A larsre parade of floats and barges will accompany the occasion, f o l l o w m e which a large b a n q u e t w i l l he, served. The i n i t i a t i o n will he In charge of the Pe- orla class of 1,000 members. The local organizers are expecting to have a membership of over 300 to start on. Anv K. of P. Is eligible and members will be accepted from any of the s u r r o u n d i n g towns. A number of K n i g h t s from Maroa. Montlcello. Mattoon. Bement and Cerro Gordo h a v e s i g n i f i e d t h e i r i n t e n t i o n s of Joining. The class will engage lodge rooms, and will have organized drill teams. The emblem of the D. O. K. K. Is a t i g e r head encircled by a double ores- cent. LOCAL, OFFICERS The Decatnr lodge held a meeting Sunday afternoon and the following officers were elecfled: Royal Nawab--Judge W. K. Whitfield, grand chancellor of the state of Illinois. Royal Vizier--W. C. Dodds. Grand Emir--John ,T. Heimberger. Mahedl--Bill Bailey. Secretary--R. C. Moran. Treasurer--Nicholas Spell, Satrap--Frank Miller. Sahib--Hugh \Veilepp, Maroa HOUSE PARJY AT PATTON RESIDENCE Mrs. Grover Patton Entertaining Young Women. Mrs. Grover Patton is entertaining lth a house party at her home, 637 Lincoln place, in honor of her sister, Mies R u t h Young of Downs. The guests are Misses Edna Adams of Bloomington; Lois Mitchell of Aurora; Annie Sweeney of Springfield, and Mabel Whittington of Eloomington. Last night a picnic was held at Faries park and tonight there will be a p a r t y at the Patton home. DELEGATES NAMED TO BLOOMINGTON Delegates to the annual conference to te held in Bloomington in September, were elected at the quarterly conference of the Second United Brethren church Monday night. Mrs. D. W. Conway was named delegate and Mrs. Mary Whitney alternate. O. F. Gibson was re-elected as church treasurer for the coming year and Calvin Whitacre was made general steward. Thursday Women's and Misses' Outer Garments Electric Fans. MRS. FIELDS, WHO HAS JUST RETURNED FROM NEW YORK, HAS BROUGHT US High Class Washable Dresses WHICH WE WILL PLACE ON SALE AT PRICES THAT WILL SURELY TEMPT OUR CUSTOMERS TO BUY SEVERAL DRESSES INSTEAD OF ONE--ALL NEW SPIC AND SPAN DRESSES AND MOST OF THEM ADVANCE MODELS. WHITE VOILE DRESS-BABY IRISH LACE NECK, SHORT SLEEVES -WIDE TUCK AROUND BOTTOM TO GIVE RUSSIAN TUNIC EFFECT SPECIAL $5.00 VALUE $1.00 $5.00 VALUE WONDERFUL WHITE VOILE AND LINGERIE DRESSES, RUSSIAN TUNIC MODELS--LACE AND EMBROIDERY TRIMMED, BEAUTIFUL DRESSES AND EASILY WORTH DOUBLE. $10.00 VALUE $5.00 $10.00 VALUE AWNING STRIPES, WHITE VOILE AND OTHER COLORED MATERIALS -- NEWEST MODELS, ALL NEW DRESSES, SPECIAL $7.50 VALUE $3.98 $7.50 VALUE ORGANDIE, VOILE AND COLORED CREPE DRESSES, PLEATED EMBROIDERED RUSSIAN TUNIC EFFECTS - THE NEW BASQUE DRESSES, AND OTHER NEWEST MODELS. $20.00 VALUE $20.00 VALUE Wash Skirts Cordeline wash skirts -- overskirt and fancy cut models, new clean skirts jiist received, $2.98 values. special Wash Sferrfs , Repp or poplin materials--Russian tunic style., Cordeline in overekirt effect, regular $4.00 values, special Wash Skirts Ratine and cordeline skirts, overskirt and Russian tunic effects, good quality materials, regular $5.00 values, special . IEWSPAPES! EWSFAPERl

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