Lenox Time Table from Lenox, Iowa on February 27, 1936 · Page 7
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Lenox Time Table from Lenox, Iowa · Page 7

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Lenox, Iowa
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Thursday, February 27, 1936
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Page 7
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LENOX TIME TABLE. LENOX. IOWA BEDTIME STORY By THORNTON W. BURGESS THE MYSTERY IS SOLVED I T WAS very mysterious. Yes, sir, It was very mysterious. Mr. Quack thought so. Mrs. Quack thought so. There, out on the Big River In the midst of the Black Shadows was something which loked like the branch of a tree. But Instead of moving down the river j a s the branch of a tree would If it were floating, this was coming ! straight across the river as If It were swimming. But how could the branch of a tree swim? That was t H-a So Mr. and Mrs. Quack Watched That Thing That Looked Like a Swimming Branch. too much for Mr. Quack. It was too much for Mrs. Quack. So they sat perfectly still among the brown stalks of the wild rice [along the edge of the Big Riv er | and not for a second did they take their eyes from that strange thing moving toward them. They were [ ready to spring Into the air and ! trust to their swift wings the Instant they should detect danger But they did not want to fly unless they had to. Besides, they were I -curious. They were very curious, i indeed. They wanted to find out i what that mysterious thing moving through the water toward them was. So Mr. and Mrs. Quack watched that thing that looked like a swimming branch draw nearer, and the nearer it drew the more they were puzzled and the more curious they felt. If it had been the pond of Paddy the Beaver instead of the Big River, they would have thought it was Paddy swimming with a branch for his winter food pile. But Paddy the Beaver was way back, ] deep in the Green Forest In his I own pond, and they knew it, for [they had spent the day at that I pond. So the thing became more I and more of a mystery. The nearer lit got the more nervous and anxious I they became, and at the same time I the greater became their curiosity. I At last Mr. Quack felt that not |even to gratify his curiosity would lit be safe to wait longer. He pre- I pared to spring into the air, know- IJng that Mrs. Quack would follow him. It was just then that a funny little sound reached them. It was a half snort, half cough, as if some one had got some water up his nose. There was something familiar about It. Mr. Quack decided to wait a few minutes longer. "I'll wait," thought Mr. Quack, "until that thing, whatever it is comes out of those Black Shadows Into the moonlight. Somehow I have a feeline that we are in no danger." So Mr. and Mrs. Quack waited and watched. In a few minutes the thing that looked like the branch of a tree came out of the Black Shadows Into the moonlight and then the mystery was solved. It was a mystery no longer. They saw that they had mistaken"the antlers of Llghtfoot the Deer for the branch of a tree. Llghtfoot was swlmmln" across the Big River on his way back to his home In the Green Forest. At once Mr. and Mrs. Quack swam out to meet him and tell him how glad they were that he was alive and safe. © T. W. Burgess—WNU Service. Huge Switches for Boulder Power Jiffy Knit Sweater With Matching Hat machinery doesn't look like an electric switch, but it performs the same function as the wall switch In a home. Tha photoffrunh shows one of a battery of four giant switches being Installed at at os ffSlde? V ' n V tatl °? by the b " reau ° f P ° wer » nd "ghfto protect the Boulder dam transmission from overloads. Operating automatically lh * MOTHER'S •> COOK BOOK SEASONABLE DISHES ¥~\ URING the cold weather we en 1 - / joy the hot foods and richer puddings and meat dishes. The fol lowing good things will be sugges tlve of many others that may be prepared: Did you ever serve pork or lamb chops rolled in corn flakes or rice flakes instead of crumbs? They are most attractive. Sliced eggplant or cauliflower crumbled with them makes an unusual and attractive way of serving such vegetables. French Fruit Salad. Peel equal quantities of bananas, pears and apples, cut into dice. Mix with mayonnaise enriched with cream and seasoned with lemon juice instead of vinegar. Serve on lettuce and garnish with cubes of tart jelly. Spiced Steam Pudding. Cream one tablespoon of shortening, add one-fourth of a cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, two and one-half cups of flour, sifted with a teaspoon of soda and one and one- half teaspoons of baking powder; Lady of Mad River JRY THIS TRICK ff By PONJAY HARRAH •AL* Copyright by Public Ledger, Inc. add one cupful of sour milk, one teaspoon each of salt and cinnamon and one-fourth of a teaspoon each of cloves, nutmeg and allspice. Add one cup of cut raisins sprinkled with some of the flour. Steam one and one-half hours. Serve with any preferred sauce. Escalloped Cheese and Olives. Brown one small onion, chopped, in one tablespoon of butter. Add one and one-half cups of tomato strained, one-half teaspoon each of salt, sugar and one-fourth teaspoon of paprika with thres tablespoons of tapioca; cook 15 minutes until the tapioca is clear, stirring frequently. Place a layer of the mixture in a greased baking dish, cover with one-half cup of cheese and 18 ripe or stuffed olives coarsely chopped; finish with a cover of buttered crumbs and bake 20 minutes. © Western Newspaper Union. THROUGH A W r C 2mans Lyes SEAS OF WORDS By DOUGLAS MALLOCH By JEAN NEWTON LATER ON SOMETHING FROM NOTHING Ihere are few women in the world who are fitted to be In the ive stock business. Such is the opinion of one of California's few jvomen cattle raisers, Miss Anne Anderson, aunt of Helen Wills loooy and owner of a cattle ranch Ituated at the headwaters of the lad river, l n Trinity county. For •7 years Miss Anderson has lived n isolation on her ranch for ten " year - Pr»n • - *"ng o "anclsco only in the winter. to San one likes to obtain some*-* thing from nothing. When that something Is money, the person who performs the feat will be heralded as a magician. In showing the "something from nothing" trick you first exhibit an empty match box with the drawer half open. Tou close the drawer and shake the box. Something rattles within ; when the box Is opened. a coin Is found Inside. The coin is In the box all along; but It is unseen at the start. Wedge the coin in between the inner end of the drawer and the top of the match box. This enables you to show the box apparently empty. By closing the box, you cause the coin to drop into the drawer. WNU Service «tT HAVEN'T had a chance for A that yet— but I'll get to It later on!" Later on! There are few of life's Joys and ambitions that have not at some ime gone to their grave in the shroud of "later on." Some people are going to have children— later on. Others are going to take care of their health- later on. Then there is getting rid of that destructive habit— later on. And getting down to work on something we want so much to do— that's one of the favorites of "later on." The people who are victims of the delusion of "later on" are the ones who are always waiting for something to "break"— for this or that rush to be over— for the time when they will have "time." It seems that no matter how long those people live they cannot learn that things never really "break," that to those with any measure of responsibility there Is always some- tiling of a "rush," that a time when they shall have "time" In the sense of time that is empty and cries for something to fill it, will never come. That "time" which to them seems the heaven of the gods Is known only to those to whom It Is hell, In the form of time to kill. For busy people there is no such Elysium. They must take their time for the things they want to do when they want to do them — now at once, not "later on." Those of us who are always waiting for later on are like the man who cannot see the woods for the trees. AVe have lost our perspective, baffled by the press of petty routine so that we lost sight of the broad and glorious vistas beyond It. © Bell Syndicate. — WNU Service. CBAS of words—with only now *-* And then an island, Seas of words—for men to plow To sight one highland. And If one thought should lift Above that ocean, Mankind prefers to drift Upon emotion. Seas of words—with only here And there a prize one, Seas of words—for men to steer to find a wise one. The orators declaim, Some print their pages, And say the same things, same Through all the ages. Seas of words—wave after wave In which to wallow, Seas of words—but few to save, Or safe to follow, Set, if a truth we read, We often miss one. For very few will heed, Heed even this one. © DouKlas Mallooh.—WNU Service. Pastel for Spring Soft pastel colors belle bold patterns in new spring fabrics. Here powder pink and blue combine with black In the stunning plaid woolen jacket which tops a black woolen skirt. The silk crepe scarf and hand-sewn suede gloves are soft blue. The high-crowned hat Is a black corded silk. About This Time of Year "Pop, what Is an encyclopedia? "Boarding house hash." • Bell Syndicate.— ANNABELLE'S ANSWERS By HAY THOMPSON DEAR ANNABELLE: DO YOU AGREE THAT PEOPLE TAKE SHORTER HONEYMOON TRIPS THAN THEY USED TO? L. C. Dear L. C.: YES—BUT THEY TAKE MORE OF THEM I Annabel!*. Chrysanthemum* at Food The nnest chrysanthemums In England were once used to provide the first course for a party of diners at a palatial hotel. Petals of the flower were boiled and mixed with herbs and spices. Result: Chrysanthemum soup. Any four-to-eight-yenr-old will be warm as toast in this sweater and cap set. The sweater's a "jiffy" knit —just plain knitting combined with yoke and sleeves of easy lacy stitch, and finished almost before you know it. The cap done In a straight strip, gathered at the top, also includes these two stitches, adding a pert pompon for good measure. Choose a colorful yarn, and there'll be no "insisting" she wear It! In pattern 5512 you will find complete instructions for making the set shown in sizes 4, C and 8 (all given in one pattern); an Illustration of it and of the stitches needed; material requirements. Send 15 cents in stamps or coins (coins preferred) to The Sewing Cir cle, Household Arts Dept, 259 W. Fourteenth St., New York, N. Y. Auto Race of 13,400 Miles The longest and most diillcult motor car race on record was run from New York to Paris In 1008. Only two of the six cars that started were able to complete the trip. The winner, driven by two Americans, made the journey of 13,400 miles—across the United States, Canada, Alaska, Siberia and Europe—in 1]2 days — Collier's. Blood Donors Unsought in Russia; Life Fluid Canned In Russia, hospitals are dispensing with the need of summoning a voluntary blood donor when cases of urgent blood transfusion arise. Instead, the patient is given a dose of this vital effusion out of a tin! Supplies of blood of all grades are stocked In glass containers, kept under refrigeration. Ruthless analysis ensures the purity of each can, so there is no danger, as in the case of direct man-to-man transfusions, of noxious germs being transferred in the process. Doctors in outlying districts requiring a transfusion have now only to communicate the specific qualities of their patient's blood to a hospital, and a tin of the same caliber is dispatched Immediately. In winter, some consignments have been landed over snow-bound areas by parachute. —Tit Bits. Beware Coughs from common colds That Hang On No matter how many medlctaea you have tried for your cough, chest cold or bronchial Irritation, you can get relief now with Oreomulsion. Serious trouble may be brewing and you cannot afford to take a chance •with anything less than Creomul- sion, which goes right to the seat of the trouble to aid nature to soothe and heal the Inflamed membranes as the germ-laden phlegm Is loosened and expelled. * I? 7 ! 0 ., 1 *,,. 0 !* 16 * remedies have failed, don't be discouraged, your druggist Is authorized to guarantee Creomulsion and to refund your money If you are not satisfied with results from the very first bottle. Get Creomulsion right now. (Adv.) CONSIDERATION It Is an unusual nature that thinksi of bitter cutting remarks but does not utter them because they'll hurt. BEFORE BABY COMES Elimination of Body Waste Is Doubiy Important In the crucial months before baby arrives it is vitally important that the body be rid of waste matter. Your intestines must func- tion-regulsrly,completely without griping. Why Physicians Recommend Milnesia Wafers These mint-flavored, candy-like wafers ara pure milk of magnesia in solid form- much pleasanter to take than liquid. Each wafer is approximately equal to a full adult dose of liquid milk of magnesia. Chewed thoroughly, then swallowed, they correct acidity in the mouth and throughout the digestive system, and insure regular, com' plete elimination without pain or effort. Milnesia Wafers come in bottles of 20 and 48, at 35c and 60c respectively, and in convenient tins for your handbag contain* ing 12 at 20c. Each wafer is approximately one adult dose of milk of magnesia. AH good drug stores sell and recommend them. Start using these delicious, effective anti-acid, gently laxative wafers today Professional samples sent free to registered physicians or dentists if request is made on professional letterhead. Select Product!, Inc., 4402 23rd St., Long lilcmd City, N. Y. 35e & 60c bottles Start today to relieve the soreness-" aid healing—and improve your skin, j. with the safe medication in The Original Milk of Magneila Wafers WHY PAY MORE? JHEIOcSIZECONTAIHS 3i TIMES ASMUCHi AS THE 5c SIZE/' NOW WHITE PETROLEUM .JELLY .ARMERS everywhere are enthusiastic in their praises of the Firestone Ground Grip Tire — they say it's the greatest traction tire ever built, and so economical. How was it possible for Firestone to build such a remarkable tire? Firestone patented construction features are the answer. Gum-Dipping, a process that soaks every cotton fiber in every cord with pure liquid rubber, prevents internal friction and heat and gives the cord body greater strength to withstand the stresses and strains of heavy pulling at low air pressures. The patented feature of two extra layers of Gum- Dipped cords under the tread locks the massive super traction tread securely to the body of the tire. This patented Ground Grip tread is made wider, heavier and deeper, with scientific spacing between the bars so that the tire is self-cleaning, yet rides smoothly on improved roads. These patented construction features are used only in Firestone Tires. This is why you get greatest traction, longest life and outstanding performance in Ground Grip Tires. They are the best investment a farmer can make. Equip your car, truck, tractor and farm implements with new Firestone Ground Grip Tires and save yourself time, money and hard work. See this remarkable tire at your nearby Firestone Auto Supply and Service Store, at your Tire Dealer, or at your Implement Dealer. Remember, when buying farm equipment specify Firestone Ground Grip Tires for greatest efficiency and economy. Listen to the Voice of Firestone featuring Richard Crooks or Nelson Badly— with Margaret Speaks, Monday evenings over Nationwide N. B. C,—WEAK Network on ysur *rwc* you can yo through * «*?* bothnr *f chain*

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