Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on February 8, 1964 · Page 1
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Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 1

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Garden City, Kansas
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Saturday, February 8, 1964
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LB J Asks Aid in Cuban Squeeze Garden City Telegram Vol. 35—No. 13 GARDEN CITY, KANSAS, 67846, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 1964 20 Pag«« WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is Rivaling to Allied governments to join in tightening a neoono- mic noose around Cuba following President Johnson's decision to separate the Guantanamo naval base completely from the Cuban economy and water supply. Johnson in effect told Cuba to keep its water. The presidential decision was announced by the State Department Friday night after a daylong series of conferences on how the United States should react to Prime Minister Fidel Castro's action Thursday in cutting the fresh water supply to the naval base. At the same time a White louse statement warned of the langers of "further provoca- Senate Passes Tax Cut Bill Wrestlers Take Over New Gym Telegram Photo Wrestling took over the local sports scene this weekend with the Western Kansas District Tournament at the new high school gym. Finals are set for tonight. (See story Pag* II). U.S. Scores Big Upset In Olympic Ski Action INNSBRUCK, Austria (AP)— A pair of daring 20-year-old American students, Billy Kidd and Jim Hcuga, rocketed to silver and bronze medals today in the slalom for the finest U.S. men's Alpine skiing perform- Education Bills Clear House TOPEKA (AP)-JThe top education bills of the 1964 budget session of the Kansas Legislature cleared major hurdles Friday, The house passed a $5 per pupil increase in state aid to elementary and high schools, 10710, and sent it to the Senate. The House also gave preliminary approval to a bill to finance operation of state universities and colleges in the next fiscal year. The House made no change In the measure which has already passed the Senate. It pro- Tides for a faculty pay increase averaging 6V6 per cent. The increase is to be allocated by the schools on a basis of merit. The Weather Gwttrally f«ir thrwflh Sunday. Night in middlt and upper 40s. Lews in upper 20$. Sunrise: 7:41 Sunset: 6:15 M»». Hin. 1'reo. Podge City 32 27 Emporia 36 23 GARDEN CITY 36 22 Goodland _ 39 23 Bill City 38 26 Russell 38 24 Sulina 38 3J Topeku _ _ 36 26 Wichita _ _ 39 30 ance ever in the Winter Olympic Games. Kidd, of Stowc, Vt, and Meu- ga, of Tahoe City, Calif., a 145- pound college boy from the University of Colorado, stunned the skiing world with second and third place finishes behind Josef Pcpi Stieglcr of Austria. Olympic observers called it the "biggest upset in Olympic skiing history." Stiegler maintained Austria's supremacy in the event, unbroken since 1952, by shooting down the two, gate-dotted courses on Birgitzkoepfl Mountain in 2 min> utes, 11.3 seconds. Kidd was timed in 2:11.27 for the two runs and Heuga, unseeded and an unfavorable 24th in the original starting list, was clocked in 2:11.52. The United States never before had won a medal in men's Alpine skiing in the Olympic Games, although its women have fared well. The two medals raised the American cache to six, including ing two Alpine skiing medals— a silver and bronze—for plucky Jean Saubert of Lakeview, Ore.; a bronze for the 14-year- old figure skating whiz, Scott Allen of Smoke Rise, N. J., and gold—the only one—for barber Terry McDermott of Essexville, Mich., in speed skating. The Russians continue to dominate the Games, with a total of 24 medals, but after a sluggish start the Americans have finished the big ice and snow spectacle on a high note. Garden Soss Gus Garden says of all the things you wear, expression is the most important. New Regime For Viet Nam SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) — Maj. Gen. Nguyen Khanh, South Viet Nam's 36 year-old strong man, announce! the formation of a new govern' inent today with himself as premier. Dapper in paratrooper's fa tigues, Khanh read the list o Cabinet officers from the steps of his office building and vowed to "bring forth all our strength to repel Communist aggression to bring security to our people especially those in the country side." Khanh named the popular Maj. Gen. Duong Van Minh a. chief of state. Minh, leader o the deposed military junta, i expected to have only nomina power. Minh will live in Saigon's Gia Long Palace, formerly occupies by the late President Ngo Din) Diem. Minh, who led the coali tion of generals that ousted the Diem regime last Nov. 1, was overthrown by Khanh's swift bloodless coup on Jan. 30. Loco/ Airport Project Okayed Word was received here this morning that Federal Aviation Agency approval has been given Garden City's runway improve nient project. U. S. Sen James Pearson's of fice informed the Telegram tha federal funds amounting to $73, 538 had been okayed for the north-south runway reconstruction, taxi-way improvements anc threshold light relocations. The city had applied for the funds last year, but approval had been delayed pending study by the F.AA- tions by Castro" and declared that the prospects "should be carefully weighed by all nations." This was taken to include a prod to the Kremlin to consider where Soviet support of the Cuban regime may be leading. "The reckless and irresponsible conduct of the Cuban government remains a constant threat to the peace of this hemisphere," the White House said. It added that "these matters" will be discussed with other Western Hemisphere nations in the Organization of American States and with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization allies. WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic congressional leaders, spurred on by President Johnson, today fixed Feb. 19 or 20 as the goal for- final action on he largest tax cut in U.S. history. The benefits, including more dollars in take-home pay, would scgin about the first of March. The Senate passed its $11.6- jillion version of the legislation Friday, 77 to 21, well ahead of the original Feb. 11 deadline fixed by its leaders. Even before the final vote, Johnson was conferring with his Capitol Hill lieutenants about speeding up plans for the Senate-House conference to reconcile Hie differences between the two chambers' versions. Sen. Harry F. Byrd, D-Va., who toads the Senate' delegation, told a reiwrter it was decided to begin the conference next Monday instead of Feb. 17 as planned earlier. He said that the coferces could meet only on Monday and Tuesday next week since Republicans will be leaving town for Lincoln Day speeches. Local Stolen Cars Located Two Garden Cilians will got their stolen cars back, thanks to alert law enforcement officers in Oklahoma and Nebraska. Four Wichita residents — two men and two women — have been arrested at Fairbury, Ncbr. in connection with car thefts at Wichita and Garden City. The Wichita car was found abandoned here yesterday. Garden City's Assistant Police Chief Richard Rohlcder said the four then took a 1957-model car owned by Michael D. Rhoades, 307 Elm, and drove it to Fairbury. The four are Ruth Hayes, 34, Donald McCoy, 17, James Campbell, 20, and Judy Castleberry, 19. The boys are being held in the Fairbury jail on charges of burglarly at Bridgeport, Nebr. The two girls also arc held in Fairbury as Accessories to the car charges. Guadalupe Guillen, 104 N. 4th, reported to police Thursday night his 1950-model car stolen from behind the Las Palmas tavern. The car was found Friday in Lawton, Okla. Lester G. Carter, Okmulgee, Okla. is being held in the Lawton jail ou a vagrancy charge pending car theft charges. Carter was living in Garden City for a time and was employed by a local construction company. The Federal Bureau of Investi gation may file charges of inter state transportation of a stolen vehicle in each caso, pending further investigation. Shortly b«for« the White House announcement that Guantanamo would be made self-sufficient in water supplies, Secretary of State Dean Rusk pictured Castro as probably undertaking a concerted campaign to force the United States to abandon the big naval base on Cuba's eastern end. "The basic fact is," Rusk told on Havana radio in rebuttal to usk's declaration that "we nain there for the foreseeable ulure.' Later Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos issued a statement n Havana radio to, he said, rent Rusk's declaration that "we ire making a premeditated ampaign to expel the United States from Guantanamo." "We will claim the base in the moment we consider convenient and will use the ways of international organizations that we will consider convenient for our' claim,' said Dorticos. Johnson ordered the Defense Department to .make Guantanamo self-sufficient. • With this order. Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, :he statement said, issued in struct ions to: "Assure the base control over ts own water supply both by conversion of sea water to fresh water and by the transportation of water by ship. "Reduce the employment of Cuban personnel who are subject to the control of the Cuban government and whose wages contribute to its foreign exchange." Asked if the Cuban water would be used if Castro turned it back on, a Defense Department spokesman said, "No. The new instruction means that we do not anticipate having to use water again from that source." the President and his advisers believe the decision on the American response is appropriate to the challenge posed by Castro in closing the pipeline to the base. Mardis Sras Dance Tdnighf It's Mardis Gras time in Garden City! The sixth annual masquerade ball and Mardis Gras celebration is to be tonight from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the New National Guard Armory. Bob Steele and his hand of Dodge City will play for the dance. Six Garden City couples are vying for the title of Mardis Gras King and Queen. Candidates are Mr. .and Mrs. Doug Tedrow, Mr, and Mrs. Dick Pruelis, Mr. and Mrs, Ronald Crook, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Joluison, Mr. and Mrs, Gordon O'Dell and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Kinney. The annual event is sponsored by the Women's Division of the Chamber of Commerce.

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