The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah on October 4, 1971 · Page 6
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The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah · Page 6

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Ogden, Utah
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Monday, October 4, 1971
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Page 6
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SA OGDEN, UTAH, MONDAY EVENING,. OCTOBER 4,19.71 • EDITORIALS Maestro Abravanel's Silver Season _.TMs week marks the .opening of Maestro Maurice Abravanel's 25th season if the far-famed Utah Symphony Orchestra and the occasion should; be a time of rejoicing for all Utah lovers of fine-music. .The Abravanel Silver Season begins in Ogden this Tuesday when he gives the down beat at 8 p.m. in the Weber Col- legeKFine Arts Center for a program of Bach, Strauss and Brahms favorites. The Utah Symphony will be in Ogden for six other engagements during the 1971-72 season, concluding on April 14 when Van Cliburn demonstrates his piano techniques that have won him world-wide acclaim. .For a quarter of a century, the names Utah Symphony and Maurice Abravanel have been synonymous. . f \ Maestro Afaravanel, born in Greece of Spanish-Portuguese parents arid raised in Switzerland, had in 1936 been the youngest conductor to direct the New York Metropolitan Opera orchestra. He had many other "big league" orchestral assignments until in 1947 he was engaged—for one year only—to conduct the Utah Symphony, then a little known organization. It was one of those "love at first sight" romances • that authors write ro-- mantic books .about. Maurice Abravanel fell in-love, with 'Utah. . ' And the symphony-minded'Utahns returned the affection. He's .taken the Utah Symphony to great heights in the music world: He and his musicians have covered great distances, geographically. This summer just past they made a •triumphal tour of Latin America that won -them .new acclaim. Among 'the -most loyal supporters of the Utah. Symphony Orchestra have been the members of !the. Ogden Symphony Guild who, as .usual, are sponsoring this season's seven-concert series here. . The 25 years that Maurice-Abravanel has conducted "our" orchestra have been great years for the organization, for'the state and for its people. The maestro has well earned the plaudits he'll receive in his silver season that opens in Ogden on Tuesday. Snow-Crushed Trees Utahns who live in the higher valleys were almost as crushed as their trees last weekend. The heavy snow — ranging to more than a foot and a half above the 5,000 foot elevation mark—descended on the trees while, they were in full leaf. • Until the storm hit, the display of fall colors had been the most spectacular in the .memory of the highlanders. But the First of October Storm was the heaviest on record. Not only were the flakes numerous but they were wet. Awfully wet! It was more than some of the trees, especially the old oaks, could stand. They bent under the load. And many broke. Sounds of the breaking trees echoed through Ogden Valley like rifle shots. It was a pitiful sight. Tall trees that had stood so erect and so proud until the storm hit were split and tattered. Landscaping plans of homeowners were ruined. Mother Nature. A capricious old gal at best Chile's Banditos * The Marxist government of Chilean president Salvador Allende Gossens has discovered a new approach to interr.a- tional blackmail. Steal another country's investments and .then add a service charge. This was the effect of the announcement by Allende that the two United, States companies with the .largest investments in Chile — Anaconda and Kenne- cott—woulo" be assessed $774 million in "excess" profits. The book value of the companies' assets seized.last July has been estimated at $400 million to $500 million. Allende's arithmetic means the two will be given no compensation for their properties, and instead will be presented a bill for several hundred million dollars. At some point the U.S. State Department may arrive at the realization it can-, not do business, at least not on an honorable basis, with governments which view the U.S. only as a rich plum to be picked. Chile under its present government is such a country. HOLMES ALEXANDER "Well, ft Isn't a 'Smile' Button, But It Isn't Exactly a Frown, Either" WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND Fulbright Has Long Record For Obstructionist Tactics WASHINGTON—"What givpj Most of the factors have been with Bill Fulbright?" it was thoroughly debated. Chrome is ^n ed Tn by A\ ViSit0r f ° tCap vil°J »* indispensable material in the Hill. The Arkansas senator cad cue *• been on his feet for a con- manufacture of weapons. Since siderable while, .trying to get a Russia became the chief ex- suspension of rules that would porter of chrome into this allow him to oppose an country, the price has rocketed amendment on the procurement f S25 t «— . Detore oy reason of absence. is military ]unacy _ Fulbright's But setting aside for a position put him on the side of moment the chrome raising the cost of weapons of procurement, the visitors' giving advantage to the USSR question went back over the O f squeezing an English Fulbright obstruction record of spea king. anti-cSmmunist na- many years. He was once t ion, of coddling the "underdeveloped" black states. NEW WEIGHT Incredibly there have hitherto been enough senators of Fulbright's persuasion to ,, , ,, . ,. ... maintain the embargo, but in But the air often went blue the past year a new weight ha s with profanity when Fulbnght been added to the scales. Sen was the subject of Lyndon John- Harry' Byrd read a letter from son's discussion. And since John- William J. Hart director son's departure, Fulbright's District 19, United Steelworkers colleagues incline to go about O f America. The letter said in shaking their heads over his part- blockades "What gives will Bill "I am concerned with the Fulbright?" it was asked, and a black and white steelworkers in senior Senator who knows him Pennsylvania maintaining their w ^ toM 'jy' aral)le -i'-., t. ». i° bs * the specialty steel in- When Bill was a kid he often dustry. If favorable disposition passed a home, behind a tall O f the Byrd amendment is not picket fence, where a nervous obtained, there will be no dog was kept. He learned that specialty steel industry in by dragging a stick across the Pennsylvania or in the United pickets he could make a noise States." that set the dog howling, to the It was this Labor support annoyance of the neighbors. along with the issue of jofas-for- I do not vouch for the story- blacks that pushed over the but it was told me by an Byrd amendment which should honorable man. The meaning of have passed on its own merits the parable is that Fulbright long ago. There was opposition considered a bright ornament of mentality. He was once very popular, so that his elevation to Chairman of Foreign Relations pleased all Ms colleagues. BLUE WITH PROFANITY Dutch-Born Diplomat Hits Discrimination danger of losing another suit to has become so sour on the of strange sorts. Senator Brooke the blond Dutch-American. w . orld ,.'™ at , he . e ^°y s annoying somehow thought that American For the department's confidential "Investigation File" on By JACK ANDERSON SHIN blue-eyed, ly, that he was turned down be- language training. support of the UN was That was a believable in- threatened by the Bvrd the Heeres case tends to back terpretation.Iast week when he Amendment, him up The file states that raise ghost of a Sen. Ted Kennedy said he was Heeres lived for almost 20 years matter disposed of the- day v o t i n g against "white" in Indonesia and had extensive **«£ w ^ n h !,T asnfn ? fi ? thRe Rhodesians Fulbright chose the language training Senate. By a vote of 36 to 46, company of these men, these WASHINGTON - A b 1 o n d, cause O f his looks and his re- Yet he was rejected as an In- j^ e £ pperfr £ Qdy h ^ refu ^ d to ideas ' ttese ^-white racist white Christian has j—..:._ .-__*-....» ,«...._i. _.. aeieie irom me that the State Department has discriminated against him. gnashing at the State Depart- The charge of reverse racial- ment, which has enough .trouble faculty. The Foreign Service Act r e 1 i g i ous d'scrimination has preventing discrimination declares unequivocally that been raised by "*'" ^—•*-- — : —*• i-i--'-- —i i— -•.•-<-i—* •- -----Heeres, a Dutch/ motiveS- He dj(J not rinnpsian instructor although as uciCLC iluul ,,, ulc , ""iiuiiy inonves. ne am not get a an^AmTricTn dtizeni hTfhould P roc ^ement bill the amend- chance to state his position in '- have had^rioritv over Indc- ment of Sen ' Henry Byrd ' ^ full < for fte Senate decline d to alien P s on tha Institute Va " to ¥ an en * ar «° P laced waive the rules ' But he has aliens on we insuiuu: „„ TJhn^ocmn ^.Vi^m^ ~™. ,,«,,,«j *„ t_,, _„„:„ some other product on a par by Willy Heiko against blacks and has just lost aliens are eligible for such jobs -^ ™° aesian pr°auci on a par is tnis sneer cussedness? Is inborn American a'discrimination suit filed by a ^'ifftfatencfoStaS "S^^&A btrfto annS S??ei!S<2? applied to teach In- determined woman diplomat qualified US citizens." i*. ' i- ^ ir ^ i rf DarK , to ann °y ln e neighbors/ ni-siwir. i«^irrno'nf_ T?i"irrc"u "Rnffnm snnpar tn hp in j :_ j .t i _ p i-_ since ijyu wiieii rresiQent tne faenate jODDies. A sname. Institute. He claims, indignant- Foggy Bottom appear to be I p T T IT D C T O T H E EDITOR STANDARD'S EXAMINER It started on a Tuesday in Ogden when a long telegram ar f" e -, 1 ? 111 ,.,. a . S ,! n ^! )n ; _, . It ended, o toally, late Saturday in Portland when the 200 of us enjoying, a reception-buf- By Murr*/ M. Mol«r Associate Editor Th« Standard-Examiner on Mainland China and ending Jette - r a P? e ' ared with a query on Vietnam. . That last question, incidental- Liberal Definition w » n ,™ se weu imenuonea peo- pants establishments that they pie that said 'Trade with them £,„ —eo-Hprf w ;th his at-mii/ Editor, Standard-Examiner: bec-au.e that may change .^^SWEteSe^Si My purpose m writing this let- them. Dr _ Warren Y ates, the East ter is to take issue with the By now reversing that stand Asian languages chairman. The opinion of Victor Drabble, whose he has disillusioned millions of dialogue which we have con- column Americans/ . _ _ densed f rom a bootleg copy of The regime in Peking is not the transcript, seems to support jook up recognized by our State Depart- Heeres: ^ ,,u._.i i __ _ •,._: i .-..__ i ^^ Yates: "We he was turned down because of his Johnson "acted against Rhodesia too white face and because he was to p i ease ^ Black African ornament of the"upper chamber, not a Moslem. members of the United Nations, once. TAPED EVIDENCE -_—____—_________ So flustered was the striped- ™,<. «, *„!. ' r ^ ~ i " >c meaning of the word liberal ment as a "legitimate govern- «t «f 5 y -j * J i 47 in the dictionary. He claims that ment; the effect of such a visit or tne * resident, the a11 Iiberals are lawless and de " > yould d emor our National- t0 ist Cm ™eirienAs. Technically days, for the hour Cabinet members or the „ lunch, the background aides, that directly involved the find v, k ri P f in itinn in mv rilr-tinn we are still at war in session opened in the Benson's war in Southeast Asia. fma ™ d" 11 ™ 0 " in m /, dlct ?™; ^L a £f 0 S 0 i *Li^f ™ + f ornate Mayfair Room under a * * * f.^' ^ e one J Jf se state ? *«* ^ lth fte ^ ed re g. lm £, n ° treaty turned as a certain couple left K^d'StS?5^ ed^le pletidST^T^ pSess^e^ee &S"gS- nam' tnese s'amfcomSunist the .room to a chorus of "Good gSSS* § ^ & ^StwnTfhf n£ ™- "*? P Ientifu1 '" ? U ?^ *-' Vi ? 1 C °^ We are Night, Mr. President. Rales were ^^ anything said tel's main floor and joined Mrs "And you, too, Mrs. Nixon," by those "up front" could be Nixon in a reception line for one woman added. quoted, but only by attribution the background briefing guests The -wire was from Herb to a "White House source," and Portland GOP notables. . Klein, communications director rather than the individual. Secret Service agents, • aug- at the White House, and his The same quintet was pres- mented by scores of security peopb whopeai the like In educated nabVe peker . . . wh <> has a culture HENRY J. TAYLOR Sen. Edward M. Kennedy Links To Meany in Presidential Bid .. . g nor the fault of the majority of n)S ^ aggression, public officials, and especially Today the Communists are not the liberals of the world. J ust as aggressive as before. The liberals are those who de- President Nixon acts like a at tne wnue wouse, ana nis •"« «""« ijuuuet «><«, ^ ics - mcmeu uy scores 01 security -."- :r "••-, "•"- - ''." — cha'neo has takpn nlsro in -RPH guage, i mean me pigmeni. xou a rerun or nisusfis oenind-the- ~~ ""~" K^~""^ wiuiui u ie assistant, Utah-native DeVan ent-the two secretaries and specialists, swarmed the hotel, f re-change of the archaic gun ™^f e nas taKen P iace m Kea -do not look like an Indonesian, scenes operation for the presi- Democratic party without the ^,1 _ * «,*, -t-^f-^^ r.t-«rr *« nvn 'U«»r. «» T« «««v — j_ i i _ T.J. laws-thar. allnt«' almnct Avprr;nn0 ^inua. _ ,,.._*! -, r *^ ^,»-«^^. _c :__ j ^_i_ _ refson g eS e t fo^sistroTm? the Ian 8 ua « e) is more ^°^ *" thV ^ldenti"ai'°pus"h~he Kennedy that they were sticking reason except to resist commu- ^ ^ religion you hve by _ „ ^^ ^ makillg _ * wift Meany ^^^3^ Hubert Yates: "All right ... We are Who sought out whom is un- H Humphrey talking about a native speaker clear but Mr. Kennedy's un- For npa . r iv40 ware ^ ft th;«« . . . even the looks of the Ian- revealed strategy is essentially , *° r , nearjy 40 ., years ' nothin S guage, I mean the pigment. You a rerun of his-1968 behind-the- nas been . P 0 ® 101 ^ wthin the - • — -*•*•— — --•—-.-».-, —-,. --j- v—__^. U . V} u ii fc.i iii^iA uic i jw t.c.1. i J.ILII i i hirt a :e staff members-ex- In each man's lapel a distinc- Jaws-flat allow almost everyone r'" 3 ;,, , n „„ M . , the times that one or tive badge indicated his assign- to P° ssess \ gun,, and Derate • ^™^ ^, 1971 Mao issued ran nut tn .fltipnri tn men): anH rtwr-™™ TTn,vn^r«j are those who desire to change -a curective on the editorial page Shumway. the three "The President has asked me ce Pt for ^ e umes mat one or tive oaage indicated his assign- - *•"—- r & T"'- "'T """'"*" „ Vh>pr>Hvp nn th» oriitnriai na^o to invite you . " it began It another ran out to attend to ment and clearance. Uniformed aure *° s . e who deslre to chan .g e - ^ ectlv ^, on S? e H ltorial P a S e explained that the President and pressing duties after the Presi- police patroled outside, where ™ e . ODVW «sly bogged down ju- i.,.,, _,-~,k«,^ «f vir. oj m ;n,-t- rfpnt. himsplf unt to t.nwn. "np.ar>(» Hpmnnct-rti-fni-c" s.'h-mtnj dlCial SVStem which IS .still On- key members of his adminis- dent himself got to town. "peace demonstrators" chanted diclal system which is .still op- <frnment nei tration would meet Northwest- Ea ch made an opening state- from early afternoon until late eratin g as lf this were-1871 not ^ "j.^.ir ern news media representatives pep', explaining what in his in the evening. 197 1. What of pollution, the war, in Portland on Saturday for a jurisdiction was most important When we stepped to the head racism, etc. These are all things "background-briefing."- at the moment. These included of the receiving line, Herb Klein that liberals want to change or There's a tremendous value requests for support of such ad- shook hands, turned to the Pres- destroy, to such sessions " ministration programs as labor ident and gave our names. The If ' you Inus t blame someone It's like looking at a house, law reform and enactment of President shook, hands firmly, for the high crime rate, blame If you go over the property a new, modernized set of land then repeated the introduction those irresponsible, so called with its architects, you can bet- use laws. + ~ ^ ; " "" f " "^m,™™**-™*'' ,,,i, n /.*»,'<• ™=™ ter understand what is intend- Then came the questions and ', In to his wife We chatted' for one thing." dency. " " support of organized labor — a Heeres's complaint was As Mr. Kennedy did in 1968, support which supplied at least .jrned over to the State De- he is now systematically pro- S 2 ^ million and hundreds of partment's Equal Employment testing that he is not a candid- thousands of precinct workers to "unite Opportunity Office to investi- ate for tLe White House — a (vital) for Mr. Humphrey in his States g^e. Ronald Kelly, the investi- mere political tactic that also presidential attempt. gator assigned to the case, got was employed by brother Robert N<w Mr- Meauy's unrevealed an admission out of Dr. Yates F. Kennedy from the period of green light to Mr. Kennedy, in- that the Institute's rules "might President -John F. Kennedy's ste ad of the fatal 1968 blackball be discriminatory or might at assassination until Robert Ken- ™at derailed his ambitions at lease tend to discriminate." nedy's open declaration for tiie ™ e Chicago convention, un- Still, the Institute refused to presidency. blocks Mr. Kennedy's 1972 stra- ™se irresponsioie, so caiiea — ^'^"-5, add^b^ rate!ymiiiv hire an Indonesian instructor Both required, of course, a no- tegy. This is sharply relevant f^T^^L^l^l^S dered ^million people to de- with blond hair and blue_eyes. chance stalking horse they could to our unders tandag of fte fa- dogs." -They have not 1952 the AFL made a study that within two the" Reds had mo e o . . atted' briefly, express- to find the feme to help change moralize opposition and consoli- Footnote: Institute Director safely back and who -would step toe, especially as we hear Mr. ed with its layout and decora- answers on a wide variety of ing our thanks for the. confer- the things that need changing, d t ^ ^ • Estimates Howard Shollenberger declined aside at convention time in their Kennedy unabashedly continue d comarin n o or the 'conservatives" oraniza- p - e h's "no no" ose a . subjects/ Most were serious A ence and. comparing notes on or the 'conservatives" organiza- v s, few weren't, like a Nevada edi- Nevada mining towns with Mrs. tons such as the Mafia, which d d , 0 m ij]i 0n e, tor's query on when houses of Nixon, born-on St. Patrick's has been around for a long time, I£ Q , r aeai -- and is now making quite a profit on > s ^ isit t more aeainst Mr Nix . communistic write The - Blame all.of those "good citi- WhiteHouse ineton ens" who can't possibly take 2 0500 washin g t( > n . - «w«w- Gwenda Porter Ogden to get back all foreign aid from the Dutch royal family. tions. And, for writing editorials, such a background is invaluable, . . when received on a 'reasonably ill fame in his state—operating Day—in Ely. objective basis, on public land—would be closed. Then we went to the buffet from the drugs that they supply atheistic amoral We flew to Portland late Fri- "That one you're talking about and, a few minutes later the to our children. to him- Richard M day on a United Air Lines jet was closed three hours and 10 Nixons returned to their, own ™* " -' il —- "-—' - :i! " iuuml1 - ivl that stopped at Boise and Pen- minutes after we learned about room. dleton and checked into the it," a White House source an- Our companion noted that in the time to vote on election day Benson, an old-style hotel in the swered. the receiving line the First Lady because other things are more grand manner that has certainly The Nevadan smiled, counter- stood quietly in the receiving pressing or those who don't been kept up-to-date. ing, "nope, not the one I'm line, two steps beyond her hus- bother to attend city board Saturday, at 11 a.m. on Fri- talking about. This is a new band and' a trifle to the rear, meetings, then gripe when day in the newer, cold-style one!" - While he shook hands with each something happens that affects Portland Hilton, there was the * * * . guest, she narrowed her eyes them. No sir;, I'say God bless opening news conference. At 4:28 p.m., Herb Klein slightly to read the'name tags; the liberals for being concerned It featured Interior Secretary stopped things, pointed toward then greeted each one by name..- a b ou t what is happening-to this Rogers CL B. Morton. Labor the doorway and announced: Mrs. Nixon wore a two-piece wor i d and'more so for trying to ro ™n'ed' that LeRov HadT P vTf **"*• unscoii, B, daughtf Secretary James D. Hodgson, ' "Gentlemen, the President of ensemble in a periwinkle blue do something about it. ?'nr?h Osd^n n^s rJsi^H L a Mr.'and Mrs. J.'W. Driscoll, Management-Budget Director the United States.". - , and green wool. The slightly Dale W. Clear w"v± V&TrL5L..^?l-_.-? cs ^ run over twin? hv a lirtt George P. Shultz, John D. Ehr- The~ cmef executive entered gathered skirt was knee length, - Hill AFB lichman, the President's assist- the room with.a rapid stride the short jacket just nipped her f tteyhave - since mur . comment on the ese, pointing favor. Robert Kennedy used his h's "no, no" pose, as patently out t hat Heeres is still appeal- brother-in-law Sargent Shriver. fals e as a plaster cast on a in ff .The brash Dutch-American Edward Kennedy, in turn, used wooden leg. meanwhile has demonstrated a Kennedyite Sen. George Me- San f or le«af action He Govern, as again txxlay, while filed la^ufe agluist State Publicity disavowing all intrest ^ Presidency. Inevitably, in due course, Ed. PREFERS r " ™ * erformance. ONLY YESTERDAY 20 ' Sheriff YEARS Mac M. AGO Wade 50 YEARS AGO an- reveal tte truth again in 1972. FED, TO NEWSMAN than George Meany. And his Readers may recall the "draft privately stated presidential pre- Kennedy" movement contrived ference has been for Sen. Henry at the 1968 Chicago 'convention M. Jackson. In fact, Mr. Jack- to-defeat Hubert H. Humphrey's son's activity for the presiden- Ruby Driscoll, 8, daughter of nomination. This was carefully tial nomination has sprung'from was fed out by Kennedy agents to this Meany preference. ant for domestic affairs, and and a broad smile, speaking by tiny waist. Her blonde hair was Why Visit Enemy? Herb Klein. name to editors and publishers simply c o i f f e d, just a little 7 ' ' T^if -.ifo*. in "rt^sn" ceccinn "ho r0r»ncmi7pr? Ifmffpr than par Ipncffln • Editor. Standard-Examiner: This was an "open" session, he recognized. longer than ear length. Editor, Standard-Examiner: „ „,_ _„_ + . . ,. ,. newsmen and TV'commenta- But the AFL-CIO's political Weber County deputy sheriff to run ° ver twice by a light ex- ^ tjmed bjr Mr _ Kennedy arm, the Committee on Political become a special investigator at press truck driven by Jack issued a refusal statement Education (COPE), conducts Hill Air Force Base. Vaughn but .escaped serious Actually, Democratic conven- constant polls. And Siese have •. Dr. Roy Wilson said both tion leaders agree that Mr. Ken- now convinced-. Mr. Meany that nedy did not decide -to issue this -there will be a general killing- A R-5R Air had taken off a pliatonone broke hih nn l P before the balloting began and Humphrey and Jackson, that not just background. So an He toSk his place in back of Mrs. Nixon, to usT appeared I am .concerned by the lack nT^uteslarli^from'HilT n extra hundred newsmen-in ad- the podium as an aide quickly coo], just a little aloof but more of response regarding the an- cras h e d west of Salt Lake ore e ain ean an n acson, a dition to those invited to the .fastened the President's seal to than a little tired. nouncement July 15 of Presi- Municipal -Airport just 20 yards Ogden is fast becoming the 5 n i y when his convention agents .ooviousiy Senator McGovern is main meeting — were there, the front of it. Behind him, .on The President • wore a dark dent Nixon's planned visit to off us Highway. 40 killing leading grain -market of the^? etei ?? nfid1 . t ? ;atrMr - Kennedys totally meaningless except many with TV cameras and either side, were flags— the U.S. charcoal business suit, a white Communist China. Ma ,- j a h n F. Palmer and West, according to J.F. Welch, wprt.-tor « #£> fn>m JS ^r. Eu " l a S^n) as tne Kennedy stalking lights and tape recorders. . flag and the President's own (yes, white) shirt and a tie, Why- are, we not shocked M /Sgt. Ralph Westerfelt of Ed- federal grain .inspector here, gene J. McCarthy and Chicago horse rand .that the labor lead- Since Secretary Hodgson was colors. -.; faintly striped in a diagonal pat- when our President openly an- wan £. AF / Records for local grain in- Ma 7 or Richard J. Daley would ers ticket must be constructed then in the process of setting He spoke, without notes, for tern. He had ' makeup powder nounces a visit to our avowed . ; spections were broken in Sep- «<« «>rae to him. on Mr. Kennedy. M a meeting between the Presi- about five minutes, detailing on his face because of the glare enemy: ' . Sales at. . Ogden Union tember when more than 2,000 . Mr - K^edy s refusal -of a As a whole, they see so threat dent and key figures in the pro- his dock strike conference, then of lights he had faced at the In April, 1968, Nixon the "can-. Stockyards remained about the' were -checked. vice-presidential nomination was to anyaiing or anybody in New longed West Coast dock strike, said he would take questions in dock .strike, conference, .. . didate" stated: in. addressing the same in September as in an honest disavowal. But his iork Mayor John V .Lindsay's most of the questions and an- any "area of interest." His face was more- animated American Society of .Newspaper August, although there was President Harding sent to the pursuit of the presidential nom- switch to the Democratic party swers concerned the shipping The newsmen quickly respond- than his -wife's and "he obvious- Editors"! would riot 'recognize some falling .off in the transient Senate the nomination of Rufus ination was an accompanying and give Lindsay no more ••--•- njoys • to' the utmost the Red China now, and I would business on -cattle and sheep, Gardner for postmaster of fact. And the final defeat of Mr. chance for the presidential '- - ' • +< -< — --' -•- — •••- -j— -"-- — . .-i i- .«... n* ------- on Aiu-:»i.t — „„ A^x^r, w« io now assistant Kennedy's strategy came when nomination than a- nut und'Jr a the big labor-controlled delega- steam hammer. tieup. It was confusion, as mass conferences tend ed, asking, during the next 30 ly enjoys such minutes, a'total of 15 questions, meeting of people that come not agree to admitting it to the Manager R.C. Albright repor- Ogden. He is to be beginning with one on events his way. U.N. and I wouldn't go along ted. postmaster, ' ' !•!

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