Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on April 4, 1969 · Page 74
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Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona · Page 74

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Phoenix, Arizona
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Friday, April 4, 1969
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Page 74
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44 the Arizona Wro*nit, Fri., April 4, EDITION* REP. SAM STEIGER Navajo legal aid program is continued By BEN COLE Republic Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - The government yesterday provided $800,000 to keep the controversial legal services program on the Navajo Reservation running until August. Rep Sam Steiger, R-Ariz., whose district comprises the Navajos, was astonished. He has complained that the program, far from helping the Indians, has stirred up bitterness, is overfunded, and has. too littte to do anyway. THE PROGRAM was launched a year ago through the Navajo Office of Economic Opportunity with a $900,000 grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity in Washington. NOEO assigned the legal services program to a Navajo legal office specially created for the purpose, Dineiina Na- haiilna be Agaditahe, Inc. (DNA). DNA is headed by Ted Mitchell, a non-Indian who receives a $17,000 salary for running the Navajo legal services program. Navajo complaints against Mitchell and his program mainly bear on his zeal for carrying the American system of jurisprudence into Navajo tribal courts. TRIBAL JUDGES, accustomed to hearing cases and handing down rulings on their personal responsibility and out of their knowledge of tribal traditions, were nonplussed. Procedural objections, the niceties of rules of evidence, and the various rules of evidence, and the amendments to the United States Constitution never before had interfered with the administration of Navajo justice. After matters reached a high state of tension, with Mitchell laughing out of turn and getting hit by matriarch Annie Wauneka, the Navajo Tribal Council banished DNA from its reservation, as big as West Virginia. DNA WENT to federal court, however, and pressed his privilege of being on the reservation under the Civil Rights Act. The courts sustained Mitchell's presence on Indian lands, and the Navajos decided to ask that DNA get no further money with which to operate. In the case of Navajo legal services, OEO elected to keep DNA running with a direct grant outside the NOEO's jur- isdicton. Steiger predicted the government's action will stir more controversy and bitterness on the reservation. The congressman said he was advised that the legal services operation has only 20 pending cases of litigation. "CONSIDERING that it operates with a fund 3Vi times as big as the office of Arizona's attorney general, I am constrained to think proportions are being pushed a little," Steiger observed. The congressman said he questioned whether the original purpose of federally- financed legal assistance for improverished Navajos contemplated interference with tribal courts. Phoenix consumer will be surveyed Phoenix area households will be surveyed this month to determine prospect purchasers of houses, cars, and appliances, according to the regional office of the Bureau of the Census in Denver. The nationwide "consumer tspectations" serves as a guide to national economic growth, a regional office spokesman explained. This pastoral scene in Oakcreek Country was snapped by one of Hollywood's top film artists, scouting locations for a new outdoor action movie. Notice the expert touch? This shot was taken by Franklyn Raymond Willis, age nine, who thought he captured 18th hole action in a recent pro tourney at Oakcreek Country Club. He didn't. A cameraman's paradise yours to own! t The Professionals O f Hollywood put our beautiful land high on their list of ideal "location" spots. You've probably seen many of the movies starring Oakcreek country . . . famous films like "Broken Arrow" , . . "Stranger on Horseback" . . , "Cheyenne" . . . and "3:10 to Yuma." And the dozens of television shows, including several Walt Disney outdoor adventures. Millions of feet of film have been shot here by The Professionals . . . millions of people around the globe have thrilled to our redrock landscape on their movie and TV screens. UnprOleSSlOnalS choose our area too! Dads with their instamatic movie cameras . . . Moms with their Color Polaroids . . . and kids with whatever they're allowed to handle. The country's made for taking pictures because it's too pretty to just talk about when you get home! JN OW this lovely land can be your private setting for pleasure. The scenes that others enjoy on film can belong to you along with balmy year-round temperatures . . . a wide choice of outdoor activities . . . and the contentment of knowing you've made a sound investment. The Village of Oakcreek, located five miles south of Sedona on Arizona Route 179, is a master-planned residential-recreational-resort community encompassing 920 rolling acres . . : the entire Sedona-Oakcreek area. Homesites are available for as low as $3,000 — with underground utilities, unobtrusive paved roads and ample water. Activities include GOLF on the challenging new Robert Trent Jones course . . . ADVENTURE ON HORSEBACK from Dooley ville Stables . . . DINING in beautiful new Wild Turkey Inn . . . and EXPLORING THE WONDERS of an unspoiled countryside. More than 500 people have already made their lot purchases in Village of Oakcreek. Many are there right now . . . today . . . enjoying a vacation hideaway that's open to them year 'round, not just in summer. Come to Village of Oakcreek this weekend. Focus your camera on the scene you like best. Then . . . make it your own ! THE VILUAGe OF I'd like to know more about this Cameraman's Paradise. Please send me your color brochure and other available information. NAME. ADDRESS. C1TY__ -STATE- Mail to Village of Oakcreek, Suite 700, 111 W. Monroe, Phoenix, Arizona 85003. R43 •s .

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