The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois on July 8, 1914 · Page 6
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The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois · Page 6

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Wednesday, July 8, 1914
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Page Six T H E D E C A T U R R E V I E W THE DAILY REVIEW. PUBLISHED EVERY DAT. «t the Decatnr. Illinois Foitottlce ·0 Mcond-claM matter. The Review Publishing Co. DECATUR. ILLINOIS. Off1c« In Review Building, corner of Ualn Ud North street*. Advertising rates made known on appll- Mllon at tblj office. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. DM year Cln adv«nc«, J5.00 UK month! ln advance) 2.50 Three monthn (In aa»anc« X25 f«r Wfek 10 months; he has practically passed out of their memories. Teachers should get a l i t t l e closer to modern developments in Mr. Carnegie's story. Somebody is onlv t r y i n g to joke them with the tain t h a t Carnegie is any longer a millionaire. « O I G SOME OURSELVES. The Oerbcr f a r m near Argenta Is In the Garden ^pot, and this time it has mode a prent showing. They have j u s t f i n i s h e d threshing t h i r t y - f i v e .icres, of wheat on that farm: it averages ·!! 1-K hushels to the acre: to [;ike s t r a i n off the memory call It f i f t y And this was a fielci That federal grandjury that ac-ted in Iowa a few weeks since did the record performance of f i n d i n g t h i r t y - s i x plumbers, every man of whom is "not guilty." We can know there must be something- wrong with the season when thev are quoting home gown tomatoes here In July at IS cents a pound. The f a r m e r who has had less t h a n f o r t y bushels nf wheat to t h e acre should r e f r a i n f r o m t e l l i n g his troubles in company. rJZXJ^MSZWZ^ I .-..shM. an acre. And this was a fielc, j Th, story is that we had ^ arrest, w r t i n n g of HI. objectionable natim-.^Ev^r! , nf t ] l l r t y . f i v e a c r p 5 i r e member; it ; in t h i s d e l i g h t f u l city in the month nf ?i\V'c!!n!!S'-S' ( .'"n t 'th"'"'harnc.-?e? r una r e i i n - ' ,,. ^^ ,, , j t t le patch specially tended in i J u n e . Isn't t h i s a rather s t i f f p a r e ? b l l l ' v o f t h e a d v e r t l h e r and t h e t r u t h o r i l i c rirr;-».-ntiitt"n» in.iclc K r a f l e r a of The J i f - vl^iv w i l l cnnt«r a favor If they wi 1 1 p r o m p l l v report n n v f a i l u r e on the, p.irt ot nn ac!vr'rtl«r to nrike K"f.l ntw r-presenta- tlnrt rnnnlrr-d in a R e v i e w n d v r r t l p e m c i i t Snl.sTir.er8 l e a v i n g t h e city for the s u m m e r m a y have The Review m a i l o r t tr i n - m d.illy w i t h o u t addi- tmn-il rliar::. 1 A'td r ess changed as o f l n .18 nefe.-sarv. h ' l t both old and m w should br. Kiv. n. N o t i f y hy phone or po.-tai card. THE R B V I K U - PITB. CO. TIII::H O h a r ' e p w n h p t h e r n l v c r y l t .. ! ,^d tv N . i t i l n n n n n t Pt. i t i . r r r e n . - d b v t h U s'l.iul I t a B..OI! » i-.I M S t i r e o f t h P r - s i . l r n t m a n iv.'.o r r and -i nl-' = i.ac'" I i a b f f v . | of r i n c i n t i l l o n t l ' H s n n l l pii ·s Mr. T i a b r n v s-n n ? d n n d h e p i i k t . } * f f o n t n -how t h * i t h p s e a corner. It was a srood f i n a l i t y of w h e a t , of cnurse; t h e q u a l i t y is all right "when -- i yield s r j ts Mff. This kind of wheat in f'hiraso is selling: at close to 80 cents a h i i P h e l . This is at the rate of $40 nn acre for t h i s crop, delivered in i " h h a ECO 1 Tt IP a big story, but theru is no d o u M ap to its correctness. There was n t i m e when wf used to read of whoat. r rop-= in C a l i f o r n i a t h a t made f o r t y bushels to the a c r e -- t h a t s t u f f was generally regarded as just ==om»- I morp of HIP story t h a t m i g h t be ex- I p f ' ' t f d out of C a l i f o r n i a , j T\ w i n h a v e to hp a l i t t l e more j rf spec t fill the n**xt t i m n we hear a j t . i l l w h e a t story from a n o t h e r state. | \Ve h a v e jrone fn for some record? of ] our n w n , -nid we P^Ptn to he In earnest a b o u t it TVhnt a p i t y we co\i1d not have n d e p a r t m e n t of government to pa?F o'it a tip in advance when one of w h e a t years comes nn t h e I hoard?. A f t e r three m o n t h s we e n t i t l e d to a real rain. u g h t to be TEN YEARS AGO TODAY IN DECATUR JULY S. 1004. T i \ e n t v - f i v e babies with their mothers a t t e n d e d a cradle roll party at the (,'ongrr-paltonal church. \Vord w a 5 I'umored from L i t c h f l e U J t h a t t h e * nrmirr's j u r y after a Ions and e x h a u s t i v e I n v e s t i g a t i o n had de- clr.red hy t h e i r verdict t h a t nn hlomn ·\\as attached to the Wabash for the ^\ reck. T h i r t y - f i v e friends of W. H. Foster si; r prised him on his t wen ty-foil rt-h b i r t h d a y . i '. t h " .it S a n d o f o p s r i ( h :=. nnii who nr .T= The m-eat success of the c h a u t a u q u a s t r o n g hopes of a i\f\v b u i b l i n t r in w h i m to hold f u t u r e g a t h e r i n g s of t h e k i n d . Ti-"»ld - n t r t he p n M l r . n -| -\- pi' 1 t b f l t u h \ t ^ ; i r b t i m p l . i n t HISTORY OF CIVIL WAR DAY BY DAY j t n p n r t n n t w M i M-nv T\ f U - i r n ' \ V b - dn.-.c H P ET!V*- t ) i - 1 - t w v r ?;=..'M-.n* T f i - n ' t '.#·- n « i « - f b*- w « h t - ' I ' - n a i ^ ; i n v p a r t n' ir^T th** =*-r\ i r f s of l i n t p . - i r t i r u l n r j I . u \ ' T - f o r ]--·- . I f TV- r n n M l i i r o t h e j « T r n r - I n w \ er f n r ·J' 1 ." !"* ^ v n u l r j n o t j t h i n e «f off.-" i n IT h i m $ " f . A n d nf \ r o t t r s f HIP p a r p p is t r u r n f t b ^ p h v p f - r i n n '-nll*-fl bv t b e r l ~ h rmn. Th* 1 r l ^ h m ? i n i n t h i p r a s p is n f i f t h ( v OT»P t o M i m e , i f h l i i n f t h p r r I"-. T n TTIOPPV It \* t o t 1 * 1 h f f l HP w m j H nt*t Ktvp f hp r n l l f CP p r o f ^ r p f ^ r $1 . " ^ A f a y»ar t f t h ^ m a n f / , n l f l b p en f n r *t r.on .That r l r h m - i n r - n v p v.-hnf h* m n ? t f o r tjp porvli'p h r t w a n t s , n n t a p n n n y roorp. . t p n ^ b p r will not ept any PV o u t o f i h n t rlc i m a n bv ·r n n d t h p H n r t o r . T f th* 1 to h.ivp morp P,TV . he will hft^e to fltrtit his nwn h a t t l p to »«t it. MpTrt!onJTie th** I n w y p r n n f l t h * doctor iwlll nnt e^t t h p t p n r h f - r o n n n r h t o b u y s a l t . AT A BARGAIN. A train we h a v e tb* 1 story t h a t d i n i n c r rar s p r v i ^ p does not pnv It? %rav on t h e XVn^a^h t n i l r n a d ; and probably the same story is to be had from most of thp bier railroad systems of the roun- try. Tn tpn m o n t h ? the Wabnsh has loPt ?4?-.7H.nn on t h i s pprvice. This lo?.= ip nt thp n i p of ^1.^71 a m o n t h , a l i t f i * ^ m n r p t h n n $150 a rtnv. Of r o n r p p die mnn who g~oes i n t o 9 d i n i n c r ("if -inrf order? and r a y e : f° r a srnnil mpal '·nn't nnrUTstand how the biipinp = c r n n bp r o n d n r t ^ r ] at a loss. HO irmv c:M pi-pf(% - sroorl meals at h o r n r ; anrl hp knows thpy don't co-st more t h a n a t h i r d or a f o u r t h what hp p n v ? on th* 1 d i n e r . General Sherman's forces had not B u t " n i p c r.nr ^prvlcp i? a losing yet rome up to the retreating southern P r o p o s i t i o n . WP have had t h P story j army which had left its position- «« FO long- and from so man\' quarters j t h n t t h - r e is now no room to d o u b t it. Th^ m a n w h o c o u n t s the cash and pays t h f h i l H says the linslnwR doesn't i ' * i r i n d he ousrht to k n o w . And if von nn» t r n v e l i n c it m a v he T\ o r t h \ our w h i l e to remember t h a t von rm- offpi-pj a h n r s a l n back In the ilin**r. rir to t h a t car and Ket for SI.50 a rn^nl t h n t rosts the company not IPFS t h a n ?-· ^n p should not overlook F'ieh n n n p p o r f u n i t v to beat the high eost of l i v i n e county and otherwise, There are more Democrats than Re- r-nbl leans living- in the Pixth circuit. Yet, in all counties, except Moultrle. Republicans polled nearly twice as m a n y votes in the primary as the Democrats did. \Vhy? Simply because t h e i r voters have a degree of p a t r i o t ism and p a r t y spirit which makes t h e m ashamed nf themselves if they f a i l to vote. The Republicans know how to be a d o m i n a n t party. The secret is, t h e y have the voting 1 habit. And I wish to say now, for the benefit of my f r i e n d air. Enochs and of t h e cause of Democracy in general, T h a t unless our Democratic voters copy a f t e r t h f R f - p u h i i r a n s and . get th* ha'hit nf v o t i n g (every man of us) in ,*11 plfctions, we aro goinff to lose immediately the splendid opportunity we !inw h a v p for Democra tic control of oui g o v e r n m e n t a l a f f a i r s . It may bo true t h a t some who ass u m e to be Pemoi-ratir leaders are un- w o r t h y to he f o l l o w e d ; and at times ban c a n d i d a t e s may secure nominations on our party's ticket. But these i l l s are nni correct fd by s t a y i n g away from elf t i n n s and p r i m a r i e s . The remedy is for voters all to participate in t h e i r p a r l y ' s affairs, and eliminate t h p u n w o r t h y leaders, p u t t i n g honor;I!I]M men in t h e i r place? as leaders. A -id hy 5:01115 to the polls of all elec- T I'm* 1 a nd v o t i n g for all wort hi candi- ' J . i l p y of our party, and a g a i n s t all u n - u o r t h y ont-f- A non- v o t i n g Democrat t- not as had as one who votes against IT is own p;irtv'p worthy candidates, but he i-- h a l f a s bad, and even more than. l i a ' f . for he sets a bad example for ot hei s. 1 would Appeal to a i l Democrat if? \ o t e i s to gt-t the voting h a b i t -which l i a ^ kept t h e R e p u b l i c a n party in power for so m a n y years, and then s 1 1 c r e ss'fs a r p sure to bo on our side, principles of our party are Mayor Dinneen Has Ordered Eight of Them. Mayor Dinneen expacts eventually to have the new style cold water drinking fountains installed in all parts of the city. He has ordered eight, but they have not all come yet. Two have been installed at Fairview park, one in Tnrrence park, and one at Grand ateime and Calhoun streets. Everything is ready to install the one at Water and Marietta streets. It is the i n t e n t i o n to have one at Lildorado and Illinois streets, one at Oakland and West Main streets, one at Wood and Broadway and one somewhere in the southeast part of the city. If these prove as popular as is expected more will be ordered, for ottier sections of the city. t.»- The i j c h t . K f * p r r t f i U l \ J A A I E P L HICKS. I,nc?il millers marked on I he boar STi cent? a bushel for new w h e a t as s i n r t r r . Dr. and Mrs. H. C. Jones left for two weeks* t r i p on the lakes. LEIBYS LEAVE FOR THE WEST W i l l \ Islt UmiKhti-r, Irene, lit Deer I.ortsc. Mont. Mr. and Mrs. Ceorge Leihy and Mrs. A. .1. Ston-r left Wcdm-sday for the west to sp"iid the summ. r. Mrs. Ston- ·r w i l l go to S p i t t l e . Wash., and Mr. -Mrs. L,eiby will stop off at Deer j ;e, Mont., where thev will visit I Wednesday Evening, July 18.1914J WEDDING REFRESHMENTS FOR FORT\ On North Water of Dark, Glazed Brick. l a n d Lod t l - e l 1'n. d a u g h t e r , Mrs. (Ipor^,-. M^Mlll- T h o i r other d a u g h t e r , Miss Irenf JUI.V 8. 1*04. Th* u n i o n lines u n d e r General Grant a b o u t Petersburg were slowly drawing: closer to the southern fortifications, and picket tiehting was almost continuous. General Grant's position enabled him to bide, his time, and th surrender of the town was certain. KLiiesaw m o u n t a i n , a f t e r Sherman's strategy had secured the position. who has been t e a c h i n g ... .... n o r m a j u n i v e r s i t y of Idaho, will hf-r p a r e n t s in Deer Lodge, and J L I I . S w i l l all spend t h e s u m m e r t o - Pt-.ther Mr. and Mrs. I.elbv expect go on to t h e coast, v i s i t i n g P^rt- I-:nd. S e a t t l e and o t h e r citic-s before ins: in September or October. And ttt« I t«arh" POf« MAN VOW. T h e r p IB n story t h a t A n d r e w Car- Jirsrlp rnfl v (*iv*» R, h i i n d r f d m i l l i o n dol - larp I n t h p I n n M i n e r o f l i h r n r i p ? ; In c o u n t r v riictrictP. XV e b n v p t h l ? story f r o m P f . T^nul, a plncp w h e r e t n a f h e r ? are holdins: n M* m p p t i n p . We "who hparrt and read Mr. C a r - ttejde's spperhes a n d Tv-ritincrs in ore t h a n ri dozen year? aj?o r a n ' t h r i n c ourselves tfi bplieve t h r r e is s u b s t a n - tial f o u n d s tion for t h i i story. We r a n ' t b^llevp t h e m a n h a p t h e monev. Mr. C a r n p ^ i p is the onp who lonp; «go t o J d T I P t h a t f b f m n n w h o dies r f r b f l j p c c l i ^ c r . T P p r J -- n r i * i m n i P ' T i a t o l v he h i s m r t n p v a w i y . t n man dr!np -with a o l l a r ? a f t e r a l l t h e s r w wf-ll f i l o n E r in .*· l i ? p p hp may be, c a l l W n u M a man nf his s t a k e chances on M'K DO'T KNOW THEM. ,i t u n l « i v last n terK-mpnt buiUlmsr w:i- wrci'kprl in New Ynrk by p r e m a - t u r e p \ p ] r s i r t n of n bomb. Three men d p s r r i l e d a*, anarchr-ts were killed in the w r e n k i n * of the place. Presumably r h ^ v wpre f nea c^d at work on th h n m b at the t i m e of th'- explosion. Also therp IP a fftellng this bomb was intended for use in, t h e I n t i m i d a t i o n of the Rockefellers I m m e d i a t e l y th=re was a move on rhp p a r t of p p v p r w l a n a r c h i s t ? in New York to sp-cure a p u b l i r funeral and a bis demonstration for the men who killed themselves in this way. And it wan made plain that if thp public f u n - eral was permitted there would surely he n big: demonstration. Under thp circumstances of this case you would think the surviving an- a r c h i s t s would feel like having: the funerals of the victims of this explosion as quiet as possible; you would not t h i n k they would care to direct f u r t h e r a t t e n t o n to the happening. Rut we. who live at thip distance k n o w m i g h t y little about the ways of anarchists In New York a n d that neighborhood. Well. WP need not yearn to learn morp about them. E. C. Buckley Tells of Capture of the Tampico. n n Dr. Lynn M barnes will next week bc-gin the erection of a new b u i l d i n g at 525 North Water street. The bulld- ins '"'ill a d j o i n the b u i l d i n g now occupied by the beggett Dye works and will have a frontage of forty feet and a depth of sixty feet. It will consist of one story and basement. The b u i l d i n g will be handsomely and s u b s t a n t i a l l y constructed of dark, Klazed brick. It "will contain two business rooms. Dr. Barnes owns two resi- d t n t lots in that l o c a l i t y and later lie exnerts to build on the second one. The b u i l d i n g first to be undertaken ·will be started as soon as the tenants h a v e vacated the old buildings. Dear Miss Leonard: If I am not troubling .you too much, I would much appreciate your letting me know through your column in the pa'per what refreshments and how to serve in the least expensive manner for about forty persons at the wedding reception of my sister who lives with me and who Is to be married on June 27 at 7 o'clock on the evening. Thanking you In advance. MRS. ELIZABETH C. B. So many weddings take place in the early summer that it is quite possible that other people beside the writer of the. aboxe letter will be interested in the serving of wedding refreshments. Since this reception is to take place In the evening, I assume that buffet refreshments will be served and am plan- n i n g the menu on that basis. I would suggest the following: Jellied chicken Molded salmon Lettuce and ribbon sandwiches Olives Pink and white mints Ice cream Cake Punch Coffee It Is q u i t e as necessary in planning for buffet refreshments to arrange for plenty of service as it is to arrange a satisfactory menu. Many an excellent menu has b5en spoiled in the serving. The hostess should see to it that when! a guest has salad, he also has sandwiches; that the cake is passed with the ice cream and sugar and cream with the coffee. Most careful arrangements should be made also to have all dishes that have been used promptly removed. If any dishes are allowed to clutter the table, the effect will be most undesirable. The table should be laid with a dinner cloth which may be as elaborate as one can afford. Arrange a centerpiece of flowers. Around this set the two dishes of mints and two of olives. At one end have a platter of the jellied chicken, and at the other a mold of salmon. In between put plates of sandwiches and cake. Beside each salad dish set a- pile of plates and napkins and see that these are replaced as fast as needed. The punch bowl and glasses may be set on a separate table In some convenient corner of the room and two young f r i e n d s . o f the b r i d e may be invited to assist there. Some on" must be provided, also, to remove the used glasses as they are returned. i To make sandwiches, buy four loa)e«. of white bread and two ot srahm.ml.it the same size. These, if properly at. will give about 150 sandwiches, whrlt la nearly an average of four for eajti guest. In preparing the ribbon Ml*-. wlches, out the bread in Mllces lengu- wtse. Butter the slices and put togeti- er. having a slice of graham betweti two slices of white bread. Trim and nf these crosswise. The sandwiches can t» made early in the afternon and In rr. der to keep them fresh they must In covered w i t h a cloth, wet in hot waf^f and wrung very dry. If the day ,i» warm and the cloth becomes dry »t it a second time. The platter of Jellfert chicken may be garnishtd with I*tt«» and served with mayonnaise dressing The molded salmon has a cream dree- ing and may be garnished with lettuci, cress or parsley as preferred. To make th« jellied chicken. coo| about twenty pounds of the fowl--a.v five four-pound fowl--in six quarts a'. water to which has been added season. Ing in the shape of onion, parsley, car. rot and bay leaf, tiet the chicken sirn. mer-until the meat falls from the bonei Then separate the meat, mixing th» light and dark in strips. Strain th» broth through a cheese cloth in order to remove the seasoning IngreilenM and put a layer of one and a half lnch« depth In a level pan. Under . ordinary temperature, this will jell when coW. but if the day is very warjr, add a ho^c or a box and a. half of gelatine to tfc» stock so there need be no !«ar of Ha hardening property. When the layer of jelly Is formed In the bottom of the pan. put in the strip* of meat and pour the rest of the stoclc over. Then let it cool on ice. , For the molded salmon, makaa boll* 1 ^ dressing 1 of one and a half taHespoon- f uls each of salt and mustard, bur and a half tablespoonfuls of sugar. ne anil a half tablespoonfuls of flour, sfc egss. three-quarters of a cup of vim-Jar and two and a quarter cups of milk,mixed together and cooked over hot -water. Add a, box and a half of granulztid gelatine. Flake three cans of sain* a n l pour the sauce over It Into tie mold. At serving time, beat up three c-jps it cream, add a. tablespoonful am a half of Bait, s. scant half teaspoonfulof paprika and slit tablespoonfuls of -inegar. t/AXJRA. iEONUlD. Hi to h u n d r e d m i l l ' o n --l f u r s " KP i? no ·· nd of r n u r p p rpa ed nt a n v time. well known vip ha v i n e a h u n d r e d million? a r o u n d ? T h a t f i f f u i p would p i j r p l v P o u n d , some- t b ( n ar 1 i k ** d issrra PP. acror d i n g to th e t p a ^ h i n c l a i d dnwn bv Sir. Carnegi^ 1 himself. WP can't irnaprinp he has any such piira. And Tve are told further that tax assessors nre u n a b l p to find that he IP now 3 rU-h man. He would srivp. r o n n t r y I f b r a v i p - a hundred millions if hf had the monpv. of course; he -would do a n y t h i n g to be rid of it. But a dozen y^ars ago he told us he would not be caustht w i t h such goods on his persons. Even the I. "W. "W. realize he is a. poor man; they are not making 1 attacks on Tiim. TJpton Sinclair. I^incoln Steffens and all !n that s^honj mention Mr Carnegie's name not oftener than once in three THEIR FINISH. lerta of Mexico has sent word to n^neral Funston at Vera Cruz that a tew h u n d r e d or a few thousand former H u p r t a adherents, all armed, have m u t i n l r r l : and Punston is advised to be on the lookout for an attack by them. If such attack iR made Huerta will not be held responsible, In view of the w a r n i n g he has given. And it can be added that Huerta will not be troubled further by these mutineers if they persist and really do m a k e an attack on General Funston's forces. When he and his men get done with the mutineers there will not be much of them left. Huerta need not give himself any f u r t h e r worry about mutineers who are foolish enough to attack General Funston; they are Just about at the. end of their mortal string.' Board S t e a m s h i p New O r l e a n s La. Poz. Mexico Editor "Review: I am writing yo\i about the last naval battle between two Mexican gunboats, the f e d e r a l gunboat Guerrero and the rebel boat Tampico. This was the third battle between these two and I have witnessed them all. I was on the U. S. S. New Orleans and we -were detailed to act as the Guerrero escort. She first blew up a rebel transport ot Q-uaymas n.t the month of the Taqul river and then steamed on to Topolobompo where the Tampico was anchored at sea. Beth of her engines were dead. The Guerrero opened fire at about two n i l c e awav and steamed towards the Tamrlco, which answered almost ev- ry fire of the Guerrero. The Guerrero firefl about 170 times and the Tampico about, f i f t y . The Tampico powder was damp and U was Impossible for them to get any range, as one would go over and the next one short. One of the Guerrero shells went through the Btern of the Tampico and she c a u g h t fire and was soon In flames. The crew, with the ex- ·eptlon of ten. deserted her. The Guerrero ran them down and caught them In their boats. The chief engineer and captain shot themselves ra- th»r than be captured. "We. put to sea and captured the rast of the men on the Tampico before she went down and we still have them, and refused to t u r n them over to the Guerrero. Our prisoners do not tn leave, as they were almost starved, and they t h i n k T'ncle Sam's ships, are like home. "E. C. BUCKLEY." When an elevator man wishes to know how much wheat he will get In a day he counts the threshing machines in his territory. He knows he will get every bushel they turn out, and just as fast as it can be got to him. Tou might think wheat about as perishable a crop as strawberries. DRESS CLEARANCE $10.00 Street Wash Dresses At $3.95 Included in this lot are some of the best values of the season. A fine lot of new Summer dresses, all excellent new models, including_plenty of x fects. One of the best values we have sver """~ " offered, and coining right at thia time, when you have weeks of wear ahead, should make them doubly attractive. Every dress worth double the price and a number worth 110.00. Special A Clearance of Silk Suits At $10.00 To those who have wanted to own a fine silk suit, bu^did not feeUike p*yin« $25.00 to $40.00 for one, this announcement ~ ^^ should appeal immediately. These suits are from our regular stock and were purchased to sell up to $40.00, and are the best values we were able to secure. ' Every one a new model of the latest style and at this price should not last very long. Special 50c CORSET COVERS FROM THE PEOPLE. Get the Voting Hnhlt. To the Democrats of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Illinois: Delbert R. Enochs, our nominee, for circuit judKe, is a worthy man deserving of all tiic support w? can srive him. He will spend his ene.rgies and money making a hard campaign for the success of our party, at-.d in return what will we. as Democratic voters, do? Many of you (and I e l i m i n a t e myself front this critic-Ism because 1 make it :ny binding: d u t y to vote in all elec- tione, and to assist our party whenever I c a n ) , will stay away from the rolls on election day, and others may for trivial or u n w o r t h y causes vote for a candidate of some o t h e r party. Our stay at home Democrats have already put our candidate at a his disadvantage by not voting in thp p r i - mary last Saturday. Our p a r t y is the dominant force in A m e r i c a n politics today. We control most of th" o f f i c e s from president down, national, state, CHILDREN'S COATS ONE HALF PRICE In order to make quick disposal of all children's Spring Coats we offer you choice of our entire stock at just half the regular selling price. SPECIAL 25c. A. special purchase places us in possession of a lot of fine Corset Covers at a price far below their real value. Lace and embroidery trimmed in very pretty designs, a regular 50c f\ f ~ value--Clearance sale ArftF V CHOICE OF ALL SPRING WOOL SKIRTS SOLD UP TO $10 AT $2.95. To close out quickly all remaining spring Wash Skirts we have decided to place them all in one roup regardless of selling price or cost and sell them at one price. Value. _ . . ^.95 Pattern Cloths 150 pattern cloths in the fine Irish linens, satin damask, with borders all around. All beautiful designs. Values up to $3.50. All sizes up tn 8x12, divided into two lots at d» 1 \ t .$1.05 and «J1«'*O Lunch Cloths Pure linen lunch cloths and table tops, warranted all pure linen goods, some are hemstitched. All 75c values to close out at. .once at each up to $10.00. Special.. Sensational Suit Bargains For This Sale At last we come to the final Clearance of all Spring and Summer garments, and the prices we have placed on them will move them out quickly. $1 GOWNS 75c. These gowns are regular fl.OO and are made of fine cambric and crepe in all the different styled; Clearance sale price.. $4.95 BLACK AND WHITE CHECK SKIRTS $1.95. Here is a chance to own on« of those popular black and white check skirts. Made of cotton basket weave cloth and sold at $4.95. Special .-. $1.95 COATS Values worth up 39c to $22.50, choice to out your close $1.25 Lunch Cloths 69c 36x36 pure linen lunch cloths with hemstitched edge. Also 45x45 pure linen table tops, excellent for breakfast cloths, etc, best $1.25 values reduced for July clearance sale for . . ' . . . . $5 SUITS Values worth up to $35.00, choice to out your close $3 69c 60c Dresaer Scarfs 19c 50 dozen of drawn work and embroidered dresser scarfs with hemstitched edge. Atoo pure linen tray cloths, round centers and Mexican drawn work scarfs and centers, valnes up "1 Qj* to 50c, choiee At/V lOc Linens 3%c 25 dozen of round centers with scalloped edge. Also fringed napkins QJL*» in lOc values for.. O2V» Japanese Nainsook Just received, another ca«e of that popular Japanese nainsook, the ideal fabric for dainty underwear and children's dresses. It comes 42 inches wide, a 35c value for July learanca, a 10- yard piece for $2139 iN£WSPAP£r lEWSFAFERl

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