The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas on March 9, 1966 · Page 5
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The Baytown Sun from Baytown, Texas · Page 5

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Baytown, Texas
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Wednesday, March 9, 1966
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Page 5
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THERE ARE MANY REASONS FOR DOCTOR SHORTAGE By ALTON BLAKKSLEE f The diagnosis includes, iron-!sympathy days of medicine. KTrw^/S^ 0 ?* Writ * r jicaJly, two elements that havej Today's doctors can do more. istw YORK (AP) — Dozens!made American medicine very!But, as in open-heart surgery a of reasons are advanced as-good medicine indeed. | whole team of surgeons, phy- causes of today's shortage of| One is its quality, stemming I sicians, nurses and other skilled Wednesday. MarcK 9, 1966 Wit doctors and health personnel. Hear DR. ROBT. GOODRICH MAR. 27-30 ST. MARK'S METHODIST CHURCH partly from very high stand- j people may become involved ards of medical school training,]for one patient at a time. ( most observers point out. Butj A cardiologist estimates 45,this has limited the output, withjooo heart attack victims who only about 8,000 new doctors be-j now die soon after their attacks ing graduated annually fromj could be saved each year if ma- U.S. schools. i jo- hospitals all had intensive Another is brilliant progress! care units. But each unit re- from research—new drugs, new [quires a 24-hour staff of nurses, surgical and medical and reha-; doctors and technicians, razor ^bilitation techniques, all making'sharp in skills, ready to rush to I the physician far more effective; a patient's bedside a * the first i than in the old sugar pill and .signal of trouble. LIMITED TIME ONLY See WILKIES fora REFUND on your purchase of a SUPERLINE AIR CONDITIONER Hod*! StDlOSB or SD9083 Mow for a limited time only get a $20 "Cool Cash" bonus—in addition to today's top value in cool, cool comfort—when you buy ane of our G-E model RD108B or RD908B room air conditioners. We will send in the proof of your purchase and you will get a $20 refund check within ten days from the Genera! Dectric distribu tor. See details of offer below. You Get Super Quiet, Super Cooling... plus >U these General Electric features: 9 Powerful cooling airflow —up to 570 cubic feet per minute. • Automatic temperature control. • Air exchanger. • Reusable Air Filter. • Heavy-duty design, for long life. 19,000 BTU/hr Model RD908B WAS $349.95 NOW 23,000 BTU/hr Model RD108B WAS S3 89.95 NOW CennnJ Etoctric Room Air Conditioner* "COOL CASH" REFUND OFFER $ •iqr i nn Central Bcctfc mod«I RD108B or RD90R8 room air conditioner during th« pr*»cr1b«d' offer p*rtod. Comptete * rrfunl cUim term obU*n»bJ« from « p*rtidpttin< d*»ter »rxl the G»n«r»t EtacMc Room Air Cotxatxxxr <£«Sr-b</tor «tt p«y you wttttn ten d*y*. UnUtx! one eflw per fir conditioner p«rcJl«»ed. Ofler vox! when pm- biblted by Inc. OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 23rd WILKIES TEN-TEN DECKER SAX JACTNTO HOSPITAL ACROSS FROM 582-8447 Too many go into research for "nice 9 to 5 jobs, leaving fewer physicians on the firing line seeing patients," says one busy New York City internist. "Lots of the research is minor." Administrative tasks, government and military service, other Jobs also employ doctors. Right now, only 63 out of every 100 U.S. doctors are engaged in private practice. Each year, 10.000 young American men and women are turned down in their applications to enter medical schools— 88 of them now. There are five schools of osteopathic medicine. At least 13 new medical schools are being started, but it takes 10 years and ?35 million or more from initial plans for Baytown Gi Honored For Performance MR. AXD MRS. George Graves, former Bay- tonians now living in Dayton, are holding: a Texas-size turnip that was grown in their garden. The Big-X weighs a whopping 1254 pounds and is 30 inches in diameter. Mr. and Mrs. Graves moved to Baytown. in 1926 and moved to Dayton in 1938. (Baytown Sun Photo by Clay Xolen) Albert J. Shmidl Seeks Re-Elecf ion As Crosby Trustee Albert J. Shmidl, who seeks .dren, Mrs. John Brooks and Rob- projects, are part of the board re-eiectior. to Position 1 on the a school to the first graduating Crosby School Board, is complet- class. And medical education is, ing his first three - year term costly—515,000 to 520^300 over as a trustee, four years. Shmidl, a research specialist Many rejected U.S. students w ith Esso Research & Engineer- have been going to foreignjing Co., has been employed 36 schools, but some of those schools are now closing their doors to them. Americans years with Humble. He has lived at Crosby 14 years. Shmidl received his high trained abroad are estimated to school education in New Quirk, comprise about one-quarter of .Okla. and a bachelor of science the 1,400 newly licensed doctors ] degree from Southwestern Col- each year who studied outside siege in Winnsfield, Kan. During the United States and Canada. I two years of graduate study at The rest constitute part of the the University of Kansas, he "brain drain" from other ccun-i served as a part - tihe instruc- tries. ; "Organized medicine and organizations of medical education are not facing up to the problems of the medical manpower shortage," says Dr. Eliot Corday of Los Angeles, president of the American College of Cardiology. Organizations, like individuals often tend to resist change. Dr. Michael E. DeBakey of Houston, Tex. notes that professional organizations tend to become "guild-like, and staunchly defend domains." Is it still necessary to train all tor. He and his wife have two chil- Andrew Spence Asks Re-Election To Position II AndrewSpence, candidate for Position H in the Crosby School rigidly and (Board race, is president of the their" health Spence & Green Chemical Co.: and director of J. M. Smith Co., medical students alike, he asks?! anr J independent research Present laws virtually require development engineer. and ert Shmidl, He is a member of the Unitarian Church in Houston and the American Chemica] Society. He made the following statement in regard to his candidacy for re - election: "With reference to my position as a candidate for the school board, I believe that the Crosby system has good schools; however, improvement should be a goal. It does not seem fair to put all the burden for improvement on the teachers. Part of this responsibility rests with the board of trustees, the administration and the public. "Several areas of board responsibility are: "1. The formulation of a written board policy which is updated, or revised each year. Since the policy outlines the procedures, responsibilities and educational emphasis, it cannot be by - passed without bad results. "2. The board should feel a definite responsibility to inform the public concerning the major school problems by news lettoi and through encouraging attendance of open meetings. Com plete minutes of board meetings should be made available to the public, where matters of personnel are not involved. this — to obtain his license, th'ej Spence has one plant operat- "physician must pass examina-)tog on waste materials from Pa-| pr - fess r or r a Tdevelopment oY the tions measuring his knowledge "Per industry under patents de- in many areas of medicine. jveloped since moving to Crosby. "But is it really necessary for an ophthalmologist to know how- many bones there foot?" he asked. Numerous medical schools are in a ferment of re-examining Kg is presently planning plants to operate under patents applied are in the j for in the fats and vegetable oil industry and petroleum industry. Spence received a bachelor of science degree in chemical engi- and experimenting with their j ne ering from Rose Polytechnic curricula, to streamline teach- institute, where he was a mem- , ^ _««_-„ ber of Lambda Chi fraternity His wife received a bachelor of science degree from Roosevelt College and attended Northwest em and University of Illinois, The Spences hav e three sons — Robert, seventh grade student in Crosby Junior High School; teachers through rewarding for merit, years of service and advanced training. "4. The emphasis on vocational training, and special government ing, make it more effective. A few are experimenting with compressing four years of col-j lege and four of medical school into sixjOb) total for picked students, and report this a P proach looks promising. Some observers stress a shortage of modem skills as a ser- ^ Ajrfjw ^ wmi ° m> Sopho l ious problem. The majority of doctors never go back to school for refresher courses, and are "practicing today's medicine with yesterday's tools and information," declared Dr. W. Albert Sullivan, Jr., of the University of Minnesota Medical School. The manpower shortage includes pediatricians and psychi- jatrists, medical school faculty— nearly 1,000 positions are listed as unfilled; nurses, technologists, medical social workers and librarians, hospital pharmacists. X-ray technicians, orderlies, and many others. Low pav often is blamed. Girls can earn higher incomes, in most cities, as stenographers than registered nurses. Some groups of hospital workers are notoriously underpaid, said Dr. John Knowles of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and "you can't feed the poor sawdust and expect them to protect your birthright.*' And if, as applies to some big hospitals, "You have dingy, shabby surroundings for people to \vork in, you wind up with shabby personnel, and not many of them." 'more and freshmen students ai Rose Polytecnic Institute, where j pasos air Port- they are studying Chemical engi- "" neering. Both are on the "dean's list" and both are graduates o Crosby High School. Spence said he will explain his platform by letter to the patrons of the Crosby Independent School District at a later date. Johnny Cash Is Fined, Gets Suspended Term EL PASO (AP)—Singer Johnny Cash was fined 51,000 and given a 30-day suspended jail sentence Tuesday on a charge of possessing illegal drugs. Cash pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court after his arrest Oct. 4 as he was leaving El Officers said Cash had 668 dexedrine tablets and 475 me- !->robamate tablets, which he said ne obtained in Juarez. Judge D. W. Suttle sentenced responsibility. "5. A most important item is fair and equitable taxes for local support of the schools. This responsibility rests with the board of equalization which is appoint- Army Sp-4 George M. Knierim Jr., of Baytown was named soldier of the month for the 385th Military Police Battalion in Germany. A military policeman in Company A, he was selected for his soldierly appearance, knowledge and performance of duties. He enetered the Army in May. 1963, and arrived overseas the following November. Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Knierim of Baytown, he is a 1961 graduate of Robert E. Lee High School and attended Lee College. LARGEST LANDING Seaman Apprentice Joseph T. Bond, son of Mrs. L. J. Bond of Baytown. participated in Operation "Double Eagle," the largest amphibious landing ever made in Viet Nam. The assault landing of a large U.S. Marine force began when a 13-ship Naval Task Force steamed into the objective area in the predawn hours of Jan. 28. Eight waves of assault troops! were landed on the beaches, while warships patroOed offshore to provide naval gunfire support HAWAII Boilerman Second Class Howard E. Jones, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Jones, 208 Alva. stopped in Hawaii last month while serving aboard the guided missile light cruiser USS Providence, flagship for Vice Admiral L. P. Ramage, Commander. U.S. First Fleet. While enroute to Hawaii from San Diego, the Providence responded to a distress call for medical assistant from the Coast Guard Cutter Wachusett. racing seven hours to meet the Cutter ing assigned to Clark Air Base (the U.S. Army Reserve. He and in the Philippines for duty with the Air Force Communications Service. Son of Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Gillis. 18 Stimson, he graduated from a training course for radio repairmen at Keesler AFB. Miss. He attended Lee College. BASIC TRAINING Navy Seaman Recruits Derek Stout and Jack Ratliff, both of Baytown. are taking seven weeks of basic training in the Naval Trailing Center in San Diego. Stout is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Stout. Ratliff is the son of Bryant J. Ratliff. FLEET OILER Firemen Apprentice Michael A. Wilder, son of Mr and Mrs. Leonard A. Wilder, 2007 Olive, is serving aboard the fleet ofler USS Caloosahatch.ee. homeport- ed in Newport, R.I. The ship pro- wife. Maye. and four children live at 1900 Richardson. Maj. Berge is a member of the 75th Maneuver Area Command. He served ^ith the 25th Infantry Division in Korea and Japan. In civilian life he is a geologist with Hu/nWe Oil and Refining Co. RENT-A-CAR ed by the trustees. In 1964 our I and take aboard a seriously in- appointed evaluation boaard in- : jured seaman. creased ths value of the pipe lines in the district to equal the county assessment. This was one against legal advice and has re suited in about 58,000 additional income each year to our school district." with fuel, oil and other lubricants, enabling them to remain as low as $5.00 per day THAD FELTON OF BAYTOWN CA 8-0751 (Houston) TO PHELIPINES A-2c Arthur O. Gil! is JT. is be-1 at sea for extended periods. John H. Berge has been promoted to the rank of majo SHOP WITH US THURSDAYS FROM 9-5:30 Baytown Schools Spend $468.42 On Each Student Baytown schools spent an average of $468.42 per pupil during the 1964-65 fiscal year. That figure compares with 5453.76 for the previous fiscal year and 5444.59 for 1962-63. Instructional costs per pupil amounted to $357.99 for 1964^5. which was 76.4 per cent of sthe total per pupil expenditures. '"'" These are a few of many figures on the finances of Hair is County school districts in a TS- port prepared by the Tax Research Association. The 22 school districts in the county had average per - pupil expenditures of ?359.67 for 193453. That average was reduced by the Houston district figure, which was only S337.31. Average 'or the 21 districts not including Houston was 5397.53. Per - pupil instructional costr averaged 5294.79 for the 22 districts and 1311.58 for all except Houston, which had only $284.87. The per pupil total cost for 1964-65 in the La Porte School District was S521.34, of which $387.73 was spent on instruction- Comprehensive figures fo- i Crosby School District are 5334.08 and 5270.56. Glasses Found A. R. KER.TLEY of 2100 Alabama found a pair of prescription glasses Monday afternoon on "Red Hill," at the end of Mis- MAKES A WOW OF A SANDWICH ROMAN MEAL THIN-SLICED SANDWICH LOAF Goiden-brown sandwich slices combining the tender texture of white bread with the natural goodness of whole-grain wheat, rye, bran, flax and golden honey. Better for you...tastes better, too. Cash and said the folk singer souri Street. The glasses may would be on unsupervised pro- be reclaimed by the owner at bation. I the Baytown Sun office. THE LIGHT BROWN BREAD WITH HATURAL WHOLE-BRAIN 600DNESS Handbook Published AUSTIN (AP) — A handbook published by the Texas Highway Department lists more than 1,000 attractions for tourists in Texas Volkswagen Litrie Known Facts About A Weil Known Little Car! DID YOU KNOW? Did yon know that at Texas Motor Import there is a special air conditioned, humidity controlled, room where they work OR just the Volkswagen engine? You see, they never work on the engine in the car, they remove it in only 90 minutes. TEXAS MOTOR IMPORT 606 Hast Texas Avo. AUTHORIZED DEAJUEB Phone £82-8(13 ALWAYS FIRST OUAUTY 220 W. TEXAS MONDAY & THURSDAY OPEN 'TH. 9:00 P.M. Pair of hurricane lamps or candlesticks. NOTION FAIR Here's just a few of our wide selection of gadgets and gifts ...come see them ai!! your choice Set of 3 inflatable piastic hangers. Set o f 6 enamelled metal mugs. TV snack tray, matching insulated mug. Games tablecloth of wipe-clean vinyl. 88 I c JSL ^ *v^T'' '•^p-' *»*—rv Spice rack, complete with 4 spice jars. Aluminum o-cup coffee percolator. Decorative porcelain switch plates. BUY NOW AT THIS LOW LOW PRICE! Flashlight - screw- cjrivar set. 4 blades. Portable fan. Batteries not included. Huge plastic laundry bag has many uses. Burlap shoe tote, waterproof lining. Travel kit, fitted with handy accessories. Charge If!

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