Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on September 23, 1987 · Page 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 7

Publication:
Location:
Ukiah, California
Issue Date:
Wednesday, September 23, 1987
Page:
Page 7
Start Free Trial
Cancel

THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL Shasta libraries shut down REDDING (AP) — The public library system that serves Shasta County's 133,800 residents is shutting down, the victim of a money shortage, and some people are fighting mad. "I'm angry; I'm furious," said Jean Hastings, who makes a weekly 30-minute drive to use the library in Redding, about 190 air miles north of San Francisco. "This ranks with book burning; it's even worse. Denying people a library is denying them a part of life," Hastings added. The county supervisors gave final approval Tuesday to a plan to shut the library system's 10 branches Oct. 15 pending an election next January on a parcel tax proposal aimed at raising i $1.5 million. The proposal, to create a special facilities district to revive the libraries, needs a two-thirds majority approval to pass, however. State and local library officials say it is the first time since 1979 that a California county has been forced to close its libraries because of a funding shortage. Alameda County closed its libraries in 1979 in the wake of Proposition 13, the ballot measure that slashed property taxes by $7 billion, but reopened them less than two months later. The Shasta County supervisors, blaming the costs of state-mandated programs, were forced to cut the county's budget by $2.6 million. The county has been facing budget problems since the voters' statewide approval of Proposition 13 in 1978. "The board has worked hard to salvage the library, but we need another half-million (dollars) lo keep going through the fiscal year," said John McCrackcn, county' library services director. "We are already spread so thin there is nothing else to cut," McCracken said. But Christine Licker, a school teacher, says she finds it "incredible" that the county supervisors would close the system. "Maybe this special district is what we need to get away from the whining of county government," she said. Collean Miracle, who has worked for the county library system for 13 years, said that at first she didn't believe rumors that the libraries would close. Another library worker, Marilyn Brouillard, says library employees went through a "death and dying" period after the closure was announced. "There were fear, sadness, crying and finally acceptance," Brouillard said. No charges in maiming of protester MARTINEZ (AP) — A decision not to file criminal charges against the civilian crewmen of a Navy munitions train that ran over an anti-war protester brought angry reactions from the man's wife and fellow demonstrators. "With all the evidence we have, there was some attempt to run the train at the protesters," said HoIIcy Raucn, wife of injured protester S. Brian Willson, 46, who lost both legs. "In view of the Navy's initial representation of facts, we are dis- tur v -ed by the prosecution's attempt to whitewash the incident at Concord," added Doran Wcinbcrg, a San Francisco attorney for Willson. Willson was struck by a Navy train Sept. 1 while kneeling on tracks outside the Concord Naval Weapons Station, where he and others were protesting alleged arms shipments to Central America. Contra Costa County District Attorney Gary Yancey announced Tuesday that a three-week investigation found no evidence the three- member train crew intended to harm the protesters. Yancey said a tragic set of misunderstandings led to the incident. "By the time the train crew realized the protesters were on the track and were not attempting to move, it was too late to stop," said Yancey, at a news conference in Martinez. "The unfortunate occurrence appears to be an accident," he added. "There is no evidence the train crew intended to hit or run over any of the protesters ... I am sure they were stunned when they realized no one was moving (out of the way)." Yancey placed part of the blame for the incident on Willson and other protesters. He said they failed to adequately inform the Navy of what they were doing. Yancey's investigation, and a separate one by the Navy, will be reviewed by a House subcommittee hearing later this month. Despite the Navy's assertion that the train was moving only 5 mph when it struck Willson, and that it had braked shortly before the accident, Yancey's investigation concluded the train was traveling 15 mph and never braked. FBI agents reviewed video tapes of the on-coming train as it hit Willson to determine its speed, said Yancey. At 16 mph, Yancey said, it would take 145 feet to stop the train. He added that the train never braked because the train crew was instructed not to stop and allow protesters to jump on the train cars. He Parole board chief cleared of wrongdoing SACRAMENTO (AP)—The state Justice Department says an exhaustive probe found no evidence supporting allegations that state parole board chief Ronald Kocnig was involved in child pornography, drug trafficking, and other crimes when he was Tehama County sheriff. The investigation was the latest in a series of state, federal and local probes over the past five years, and none has resulted in charges against the 54-year-old Koenig, California's highest parole official. In declaring the case closed Tuesday, state Justice Department official Jerry demons said his agency had interviewed about 175 people and cited the earlier grand jury, state, and FBI investigations that, likewise, produced no substantiating evidence. State Justice Department spokeswoman Kali Corsaut said, "Many of the allegations were raised by a private investigator who claimed lo have been hired by an unnamed client." The department did not identify the investigator. Kocnig said he docs not know the source of allegations and is uncertain whether Tuesday's announce- ment will end the matter. The chairman of the state Board of Prison Terms said he was tired of the allegations, frustrated at the persistence of his accusers, and called himself a victim. "My reputation has been seriously damaged by the allegations.... Who returns my reputation to me after all mis is done? ... I've been investigated by everybody. I have nothing wrong in my past," Koenig said. "It's not only me that gets upset, but my family and friends as well," he said Allegations against Koenig first surfaced in 1982 when he was running for re-election as sheriff in the rural Northern California county of Tehama, said demons, who is director of the Justice Department's Division of Law Enforcement The allegations persisted following Koenig's reelection and prompted a Justice Department investigation after Gov. George Deukmejian appointed him in 198S to the Board of Prison Terms. In 1986, the department cleared Koenig of charges before his confirmation by the Senate. PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT Asphalt Pavement Protection Means Prevention and Cure Did you know that weathe>r is the greatest enemy of asphalt pavement? • When left unprotected, sunlight alone can reduce the asphalt's thickness by 50% In only tlve years. • When damage frorrA sunlight Is further jndedoy damage from water compour seepage and freeze/thaw cycles, the Impact upon asphalt pavement Is devastating. > Although the sand and rocks remain Intact, the asphalt binder can deteriorate, creating damage such as Cracking, Surface Raveling, and Longitudinal or Expansion Cracks. STOPS OIL. SALTS, CHEMICAL DAMAGE RAIN R SNOW SUN STOPS WEATHER DAMAGE REDUCES The smooth, even surface of sealed pavement makes sweeping, snow removal and maintenance easier, simpler and cheaper. DELAYS Sealing prevents water seepage Into the porous asphalt, stopping damage caused by rain, snow, frost, freezing id thawing. Delays hardening and drying caused by oxidation. RESISTS Protects asphalt against the highly damaging effects of gas and oil seepage and all other road chemicals, especially alkalis and winter BEAUTIFIES Attractive siate-oiacit appearance restores original color to asphalt and dries to an even-textured finish. More than double the life of your black-top with our special PAVEMENT SEALER "NO JOB TOO SMALL" •ASPHALT REPAIRS • SEAL. COATING •BUMPER SERVICE • PARKING LOT STRIPING FREE ESTIMATES 707487626 arnum Paving 'JAM* •>.• e*A._A^ e*A • iL.t_i> -.. • 420! N. State St. Uklah Gen.Eng.Uc. added the crew believed the protesters would get off the tracks. Yancey also said several observers noted Willson was "bumped" by his companions on the tracks. "That factor, coupled with his (then) cross-legged position, probably prevented him from reaching safety," he said. The crew was not notified before the train arrived at the crossing that the protesters had warned officials at the base that they would be on the tracks to stop the train when it passed. To file criminal charges, he said, there would have had to have been "proof beyond a reasonable doubt that the train crew had committed a crime." He said there was no such evidence. State SAT scores are up 2 points SACRAMENTO (AP) — California high school seniors who took the Scholastic Aptitude Test last year had higher average scores than the year before, and equaled the national average. State school officials said Tuesday that the seniors of the 1986-87 school year had an average total test score of 906, up two points from the year before and 11 points since the 1982-83 school year. "It's a slow, steady growth that's happened over the last five or six years," state school Superintendent Bill Honig told a news conference. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1987-7 "^ You Never Outgrow Your Need for Security While the yield on your money is important, nothing comes ahead of security for your hard-earned dollars at our bank. We guard your funds with sound, experienced management, insure each depositor through the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (F.D.I.C.) and then pay a competitive return. Safe, Sound, Secure . . . Since 1903. Savings Bank OF MENDOC1NO COUNTY A Full Service Commercial Bank Member FDIC J CIACULAR To celebrate Gooctyear's 89th Anniversary, Rino Tire Center is cutting prices more than ever before! Get ready for Fall and save with these spectacular prices. Ends Sept, 30 GOOD/YEAH ALL SEASON STEEL BELTED RADIAL TIEMPO RADIAL Sale Price SALE PRICE NO TRADE NEEDED WHITEWALL SIZE REGULAR PRICE $46.90 $51.95 $56.35 $59.35 $62.45 $65.75 $69.20 $72.85 $76.70 $36.95 $41.95 $44.95 $46.95 $49.95 $52.95 $54.95 $57.95 $60.95 165/80R13 P185/80R13 P185/75R14 P195/75R14 P205/75R14 P205/75R15 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 P155/80R13 Whitewall No Trade Needed WHEEL ALIGNMENT SPECIAL Most American Cars Goodyear Take Me Home COMPLETE WHEEL ALIGNMENT* BRAKE SERVICE RINO TIRE CENTER 240 FORD ROAD • UKIAH • 462-7556 behind Raley's in the Crossroads Shopping Center

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free