Denton Journal from Denton, Maryland on December 10, 1938 · Page 6
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Denton Journal from Denton, Maryland · Page 6

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DENTOS3 JOURNAL Page 8, MELVIN ft JOHNSON, Publiabera Saturday Morning, December 10, 183 'IMPROVED UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL S UNDAY I CHOOL .Lesson By HAHOLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. Dean of The Moody Bible Institute ol Chicago. C Western Newspaper Union. Lesson for December 11 THE SIN OF COVETOUSNESS LESSON TEXT--Exodui 20:17; Luke 12: 19-21: I Timothy 6:6-10. GOLDEN TEXT--Thou, shall not covet.-- Exodux 20:17. Lesson subjects and Scripture texts selected and copyrighted by InternaUonal Council ol Religious Education: used by permission. "The word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two- edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and Is a discerner of the thoughts and Intents Of the heart" (Heb. 4:12). These are the words that came to the writer's mind as he read the Scripture portions assigned for this lesson. He would fain have sel aside his own comments and used this column to print the words from the Bible. If any reader of these lines purposes to read just these efforts to expound the truth, and not to read the Bible itself, let me plead with you to stop here and turn to God's Word. Let its powerful truth grip your soul and change your life. It seems peculiarly appropriate that this lesson on covetousness should come right in the midst of our preparations for Christmas, for it directs our attention away from things to God, from outward preparation to the preparation of the heart, from greedy desire to true liberality of heart. Christmas may be literally "made over" for all of us if we receive its truth. ' I. A Command (Exod. 20:17). "Thou shalt not covet." This last commandment carries · us "beyond the domain of civil magistracy into that intellectual realm of motive, desire, and thought, where God alone is Lord and Judge" (Dykes). It deals with the heart, out of which are all the issues of life. It reaches to the root of so much that is wicked and destructive in the world--the covetousness of man. The love of money makes men lie, steal, kill, cheat; in 'fact, "the whole realm of human interrelations is disorganized and broken up by the dishonoring of the tenth commandment" (Morgan). n. A Warning (Luke 12:13-21). "Beware of covetousness." The teaching of this passage is so directly opposite to all ideas regard ing such matters accepted by the world at large, that it may be a total surprise to some readers and attendants at Bible school. The yardstick of success in the world--for an individual, and organization, or a nation; yes, even for many a church--is the possession of wealth, or property, or other "things." Write it then in large let ters on the hearts and minds of our boys and girls, "A man's life con. sisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth" (v. 15). ·The one who was known to his friends (and to himself) as "a rich man" (v. 16), but whom God knew as a "fool" (v. 20), had more than he could use for himself. He had to build new and bigger barns, and could not see the "barns" that were already prepared, for, as Ambrose says, "Thou hast barns--the bosoms of the needy, the houses of widows, the mouths of orphans and infants." He was a fool who loved money for himself. One wonders what he had to say fer himself when that very night he was called into the presence of God to give an account of his stewardship (v. 20). If you are similarly situated and have the same attitude, what will you say in that day? An important point which we must note is that Jesus expressly repudiated the connecting of His name with the so-called "social gospel" in His reply (v. 14) to the question of the covetous fellow who regarded his inheritance as of more importance than brotherly love. Those who are igno r ing the gospel of redemption and claiming Jesus as a social reformer or the "judge and divider" of some new economic solution for the world's ills, need to read and ponder this verse. Every Christian is interested deeply in social problems, but knows that the first concern of Christ and His followers is the souls of men. m. A Way of Victory (I Tim. 6:610). ."Godliness with contentment." As a minister of the gospel the writer would first remind himself that, this was written by Paul to the preacher Timothy. Brethren in the ministry, let us not fall into the temptation and snare that comes with the love of money. In this dizzy age when many are so intent on making money that they have no time for home and children, church and fellowship; when men neglect their responsibilities and duties as citizens to get gain; when any dirty business is all right if it produces a profit; when "for gold men betray their country, their friends, their God, their immortal , souls" (Farrar)--yes, in this day let us remind men that "we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain that we can carry nothing out." Let us teach and exemplify BIG TOP "Skookie" goei out to do his act with Alta who, so far, is going through her stunt o. k. tsy tO WHEELAN GO MVRA ' GOSH T HOPE THE ACT GOES OFF LOOK - ALTA PAV THE CHECK ANt RDURS A BOTTLE. OF "LIQUOR" ON THE WAITER.!' Tr SHE DO|N3r HER. PERFECTLY Q Fr.inK J.iy M . i r k r y Smln.iU . Inc ((f.1. 1926. Western N«wip»per Unluo.) Horizontal. 1--To Inscribe 5--Kind of fruit S--Aftarnoon social gatherings 11--Orlt 12--Exists H--Receives with favor, approves 16--Part of verb "to be" 17--To fix 19--Rabbits 20--Time past 21--Short journey 23--Took rapid steps 24--Above 25--Small blaze 27--PtBjeonltke birds 28--To prevaricate 29--Lair 30--Animal skins 32--Antitoxin 34--Injure* 35--HlKhcst part 37--To ba abundant with 39--Belonging to It 40--Character of sound (pi.) 42--To aver 41--Pertaining to 44--Indigence 4«--Initials of a President 47--A type of pfum 4S--Area of waste land SO--Wooden rings 61--Fruit drink Solution will appear In next l*»ne. 4--Every Vertical. 1--Hand and arm joint 2--Impersonal pronoun 3--Beveraco 6--Hits gently 6--Half of an em (pi.) 7--In the year of our Lord (abhr.) 8--Wit 10--To frighten 11--To pass, as time 13--Ancient slavo IS--Period of time 18--Divisions of time 18--Levers for turning rudders 20--Highways 22--Huchett 24--Open to view--unconcealed 26--Encountered 27A--Poetic dedication 30--Crown of the head 31--Cooking apparatus 32--Whale oil 33--Anlma! flesh 34--Merriment 3G--Single 38--Yellowish brown "aromatic gum resin 40--Apparel 41--To cease 44--Soft food for babies 46--Personal pronoun 47--To proceed 49--Royal navy (abbr.) in our lives the fact that the only real and worth while gain in life is "godliness with contentment." Answer To Last Week's Cross Word Puzzle THE MICHIGAN ROAD (Continued from Page Three) In the same year road lands were put up for sale at Laporte. The posv of "Commissioner of Michigan Road Lands" was created by an act of the general assembly ap proved February 2, 1832. To the commissioner, who woo to hold office for two years, were transferred all the powers of contract commissioner provided for in previous acts. Under this law William Polke became the sole commissioner in charge of the Michigan Roaa Between June 15 and November 3 · between Logansport and the moutr. of Trail creek at Lake Michigan, the commissioner was to have cut and opened a road 100 feet wide. All logs, timber and undergrowth were to be removed so that no stump higher than one foot should remain standing. The creek banks were to be graded, the swamps and muddy portions causewayed and good and sufficient bridges provided over swamps and streams where necessary to make the road pas.; able for wagons at all times. In order to be close to the work, William Polke built the first frame louse erected north of the Waba.-ih river in the state of Indiana. It was located on the east side of the Michigan Road about a mile north of the Tippecanoc river and three miles north of the settlement at Rochester. Colonel Polke also was a leading spirit in determining the location of Plymouth and probably gave the vil- age its name. Up to this time (1832) not a single one of the highways in Indiana had een improved with surfaces of broken stone or gravel. The roads of tho state were good in the summer and ;enerally bad in the winter with the exception of the sections improved ,vith corduroy surfaces. Throughout the lake plain the natural soil wus sand and gravel and in the central plain glacial clay abounded as far lown as the eouthcrmost extremity of the marginal moraine at Shelby- ille. In lower Indiana the soils were ormed from the decomposition of hale and limestone rock. The Michigan Road was opened for raval through northern Indiana in he latter part of 1833 and (luring the arly months of 1834. The macadam- zed section of the road on Washing- on street in Indianapolis al~o wus ompleted in 1834. This was the first improved street in the capital. At this period in its growth, Indianapolis, situated on the east bank of the White river, was accessible to steamboats at the ordinary levels of the river. The village was composed of some 200 houses and nearly 1,500 inhabitants. The immigration into the state was directed mainly toward the upper Wnbash and White riven?, including the counties of Warren, Fountain, Tippecanoe, Madison, Hancock, Clay, Carroll, Cass, Clinton and during the dry season. To make the roa'd serviceable in rainy weather logs were laid crosswise of the trav- elled way and covered with sand. In spite of this improvement, the condition of the surface was far from satisfactory for the large volume of traffic which passed over the section north of IndianapolLi. The general assembly was called upon at ncarlv every session to appropriate' funds for its repair because of the widespread use of the road. The Michigan Road traversed fourteen counties and was the route followed by the inhabitants of thirty-five counties in thoh journeys to and from the ntatc capital. Because of its statewirle as well as its local usefulness, the people fell justified in demanding the improvo- ment of the road through their representatives in the legislature. The urge for better road?, however, was general throughout tho state and not confined to those sections reived by the Michigan Road. The growin;; population was outstripping rapidly the more slowly expanding road system. In order to overcome- this lag in the extension and reconstruction of the public thoroughfares, the general assembly, in 183C, passed an internal improvement bill appropriating $10,000,000 for the construction of canals, railroads and macadamized roads. One fruit of this law was tho railroad between Indianapolis and Madison. Completed in 1847, this steam line began to divert travel from the southern sectioas of the Michigan Road extending from Indianapolis, through Greensburg, to Madison. This was the first step in the decline of the Michigan Rond as a public thoroughfare. The tidal wave of railroad expansion, however, did not begin to overwhelm the wagon roads of Indiana until more t h a n , a generation after the horceways had succumbed to their more formidable steam rivals east of the Allcgany mountains. Lack of public funds, more than railroad competition, was the initial factor responsible for retarding further development of the Michigan Road. The large expenditures for internal improvements were a severe drain upon the state financial resources. Tin;; unstable condition was further aggravated by the effects of the money panic which began to be felt in 1837. As a resull, the state's resources were practically prostrated and mon- TQ a ran EE[j!T Brown. The National Road was passable across the state and the first steamboat, the "Matilda Barney", docked at South Bend after having worked her way upstream-against the current of the St Joseph river. Public opinion was opposed to the construction of railroads and until 1850 the state devoted nearly all of its! public resources to the construction' of turnpikes and canals. The available state funds were supplemented by federal land-grant moneys appropriated by Congress. It was not until wagons and boats failed to provide the necessary transportation facilities that railroad construction began. During the biennlum ending in 1836 it became apparent that the grading | and grubbing work on the Michigan ' Road provided at best a surface only suitable for wagon transportation FOR THE Social Season AHEAD! You must have perfect skin, well cared for hnml- and n coiffure that docs justice tn your personality. And our experienced operators arc able to help you appear fresh and lovely at all times. PHONE 159 BEAUTY SHOPPE D E N T O N , cy bjcamc ao scarce that no further stall! aid was ablo to be given to the Michigan Road, with a notable exception. The authorization of nn important bridge project was made at the close of this pimsu in the life of the road. An act of the general assembly approved February 2, 1837, piovidccl for :in appropriation of 55,000 from tho Michigan Road fund for tlit; construction of a free bridge over tho Eel river at the north end of Bridge street, in Logansport, to bo known a,-' the "Bridge Streot and M^higan Road Bridge". Tho next step in the downward spiral of decadence was taken when the Michigan Road was returned to the counties for improvement and maintenance. Effective February 20, 1837, tho office of commissioner of the Michigan Road had been abolished and discontinued by an act of the general assembly approved February fi, 183C. By an act of the general assembly approved February. 2, 1837, provision was made 'for (he improve merit of the Michigan Road by the ovcr.sw.'r method. The incentive for this legislation was supplied by an appropriation made by Congress in the preceding year for a harbor at Michigan City. The legislature designated Julius W. Adam; as the engineer to submit a plan for the improvement of the road. A painstaking survey was made following the location of the original Michigan Road to its terminus at Lake Michigan in Michigan City, which was incorporated as a village in the same year. Tho act of February 2, 1837, provided that the various county boards, through whof-e jurisdiction the road passed, were to divide it into suitable sections. On each section a supervisor wait appointed with authority to call out the hands to keep tho road in repair. Thus in its financial dilemma the state resorted to the outworn system of road upkeep introduced into this country from England where it had survived since the Middle Ages and even from the days of the Roman Empire. The frchle efforts resulting from this law failed to put and keep the Michigan Road in a serviceable condition. Under those circunvlances it was not to be expected that travel in the early ccachea would he all pleasure. If the Michigan Road was dry, the Vassongurs often had to hold tightly as the sta»c bounced from rock to rock. If the road was wet, thcic was (lunger of being overturned into a mudhole. Fording stream- was risky business because the invisible road- v.-ay might have washed away thus plunging tho passengers into the swirling water'. There were plenty of highway accidents in those days. In 1838, a stage mired nnd overturned on Washington street in Indianapolis and several of the occupants wove injured. Then us now, however, the vehicles were being 1 improved in quality and multiplied in number,; faster than adequate roads Were being 1 provided The "WRITE" Gift For Anyone . ROYAL TYPEWRITERS Portables and Desk Type CHARLES T. BAKER Denton, Md. A Three Days' Cough Is Your Danger Signal No matter how many medicines you have tried for your common cough, chest cold, or bronchial Irritation, you may get relief now with Creomulsion. Serious trouble may be brewing and you cannot afford to take a chance with any remedy less potent than Creomulsion, which goes right to the seat of the trouble and aids nature to soothe and heal the inflamed mucous membranes and to loosen and expel germ-laden phlegm. Even If other remedies have failed, don't be discouraged, try Creomulsion. Your druggist is authorized to refund your money if you are not thoroughly satisfied with the benefits obtained. Creomulsion is one word, ask for it plainly, see that the name on the bottle Is Creomulsion, and you'll get the genuine product and the relief wont. (Adv.) for their use. In 18;!8, Cyrus Vigus of Logansport placed a new line o f , stages on the Michigan Road which run from Indianapolis, through Log- aiKiport, to Michigan City. Beautiful fourhorse coaches drawn by spirited hoiues cairied the United States mail on this line. This was a decided im- | provenient over the foimer Vigor line ' which covered the same ground twice I a week. In September, 1838, Mr. I Vigus changed tne route so that the main line connected Nile's, Mich., with Indianapolis, hid. At Niles a dail) connection was made with the coaches operating over the 250-mile lengLl of tho Chicago-Detroit Road. At Phmouih, Im!., a change of stages carried thu traveller to Michigan City nnd Lapoi to. Daily stages weio running between Indianapolis and Mnd- ison. The spick-and-span, gaily colored Vigus stages wero tho pride am joy of the hardworkir.g settlers al along the route. Steadily the regular and punctua stage schedules maintained by well- organized companies wore displacing the sporadic and unceitain means oi primitive travel common to tho western frontier. Even the frontier itself was gradually ictrcating weslwan before the advancing civilization introduced by the emigrants from the states along the Atlantic seaboard In 1938, the Potawatomi Indians were removed from the state of Indiana and settled on the reservations west of the Mississippi river. Through til the years since its inception the proceeds from tho land grants of the Rcdmcn had provided the bulk of tho money used in the construction am upkeep of the Michigan Road. Sooi the road was to become the whita man's burden. Until 1840, when it ceased to an penr on the slate auditor's reports the total expenditures on the Michigan Road aggregated $242,008 am the receipts from Indian lands adde( up to $241,332, with several hundre acres still to be sold. The treasury ol tho state of Indiana was now all but bankrupt and the majority of the citizen^ realized that it would bo many years before state funds wouli be available to finance tho needct transportation facilities. As a con sequence, by acts approved February 13, 1841, nnd January 31, 1842, the Michigan Road was classed with al other state roadii and brought entirely within the compass of the gcnora rood act of 1838. This law placed the section:; of tho road in the scvcra counties under the administration ol county boards and road supervisory appointed by them.--The American Road Builders' Association Feature;Service. Annapolis - Matapeakc Romancoke - Claiborne Ferries Classified Ads Fruit Cakes Order now--homemade fruit cake for your holiday dinner--rich with fruits nnd nuts and blended with spices--3 Jbs for $1.00 or 2 Ibs. foi 75c. MRS. CLIFTON G. GROUSE, Queen Anno, Md. Phone, Hillsboro 9-F-13. (12-3-3t) Canaries for Christmas FOR SALE--Beautiful canary birds, fine singcra. A gift that lasts. MRS. CHARLES SHAFFER, Burnsville Road, P. O. Dcnton, R. F. D. No. 1. Inquire nt Gregg's, Oil City. (12-3-21) CHICKENS FOR SALE Some nice roasting chickens from fi to 10 months old. Also some guineas, weight 3 to 4 Ibs. SEESE HOLSINGER, Campground Road, Denton, Md. For Sale Antique glassware. May be seen at my home in Marydel. MRS. FRANCES ENNIS. (12-10-31) For Sale Or Rent For sale or rent--The property on S. Second etrcut, Denton, known as White Hall. Address ALFRED T. TRUITT, (12-3-3t) ' Salisbury, Md. FALL WINTER SCHEDULE-1938 Effective September 20, 1938 DAILY AND SUNDAY (Eastern Standard Time) BETWEEN ANNAPOLIS AND MATAPEAKE Leave Annapolis Leave Matapeake 7:26 a. m *8:00 a.m. 9:00 a. m. 10:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 12:00 noon 1:00 p.m. c2:00 p. m. 3:00 p. m. 4:00 p.m. *5:00 p. m. G:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 7:25 a.m. 8:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. "11:00 a.m. 12:00 noon 1:00 p.m. 2:00 p. m. c3:00 p.m. 4:00 p. m 5:00 p.m. 0:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. ·8:00 p.m. 'Denotes bus connections via Matapeake, Romancoke and Claiborne. (c) Denotes bus connections via Matapeake only. BETWEEN ROMANCOKE AND CLAIUORNE FORECLOSURE SALE OF VALUABLE PERSONAL PROPERTY UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF the Power of Siile contained in the Chattel Mortgage from William Clark, widower, and William Eincst Clark, single man, to Hazel S. Macomber, dated September 8, IMG, and recorded in Liber T. C. II. No. 2G, folio 399, etc., Q Chattel Mortgage Book for Caroline County, and by niorne as.sitfn- nients assigned unto Thomas J. Keating, Jr., for foreclosure and collection, the undersigned Assignee will offer and expose ut public sale to the highest bidder on the farm whereon said Clarks now ru-itle on the road from Greensboro to Goldsboni, County and State aforesaid, on THURSDAY, DEC. 22,1938 at 10:30 o'clock, a. m., all of the following described personal property, to wit: Two bay marcs, Fannie and Dollie; 2 brown mules, Rachel and Mike; 2 black and white grade Guernsey cows. Reta and Nita; 1 yellow and white grade Gucrni-cy cow, Bess; 1 yellow and whitti grade Guernsey cow, Tess; 1 yellow and white grade Guernsey cow, Ruth; 1 yellow and white grade Guernsey cow, Eloi.se; 1 yellow ant! white grade Guernsey cow, June; 1 yellow ond white grade Guernsey cow, Betty; 1. grade Guernsey heifer Verna; 1 grade Guernsey bull; and al offspring of the above livestock; 1 Hackney two-horse wagon; 1 four- horse springtooth harrow; 1 two- horse Oliver plow; 1 one-horse Olive) plow; 4 one-horse walking cultivators; 2 sets wagon harness; 2 set; plow harness; and 6 collars. TERMS OF SALE Cash. No property to bo rcmove until paid for. THOMAS J. KEATING, JR., Assignee Jam tv? Temple, Auctioneer. Leave Romancoke **9:00 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p. m. **6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Leave Claiborne 8:00 a.m. **10:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p. m. 5:00 p.m. **7:00 p.m. NOTE: * 'Denotes pedestrians will be transported by motor coach between Matapeake and Romancoke and Romancoke and Matapeakc on these trips only. THE CLAIBORNE-ANNAPOLIS FERRY COMPANY, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND NOTICE TO CREDITORS This is to give notice that the subscriber, of . Caroline county, has obtained from tho Orphans' Court for Caroline county, in Maryland, letlcm of administration on the personal estate of HARRY S. FISHER late of Caroline county, . deceased. All persons having claims against the said deceased arc warned to exhibit the same to the subscriber, with the vouchers thereof legally authenticated, on or before the 10th dny of June, 1939, or they may otherwise, by law, be excluded from all benefit of eaid estate. All persons owing this ostate arc required to make prompt settlement. Given under my hand this Gth day of December, 1938. RUTH FISHER, Administratrix. Stockholders' Meeting The Denton National Bank, Dcnton, Md., Dec. G, 1938 The annual meeting of the stockholders of The Dcnton National Bank will be held in their banking house in Dcnton, on Tuesday, January 10, 1939, between the hours of one and three o'clock p. m. of that day, for the purpose of electing- directors for thu ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other proper and lawful business as may be brought before the meeting. I. ROBERT FLEETWOOD, Cashier. Stockholders' Meeting The Peoples Bank, Denton, Md., Dec. 6, 1938 The annual meeting of the stockholders of The Peopled Bank of Denton will be held in their banking house in Dcnton, on Tuesday, January 10, 1939, between the hours of one and three o'clock p. m. of that day, for the purpose of electing directors for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such other proper and lawful business as may be brought before the meeting. E. THEODORE ORME, Cashier. ADVERTISEMENT Notice To Contractors P. W. A. Project No. Md. 1111-4-F THE BOARD OF EDUCATION Or CAROLINE COUNTY, Denton Maryland: Sealed bids for GENERAL CONSTRUCTION, including ELECTRICAL WIRING for ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING AT HILLS BORO, MD., will be received by Thi Board of Education, at the office o the Board until 11:00 o'clock A. M. Friday, December 23, 1938, Easterr Standard Time, and then at said offict publicly opened and read aloud. The Information for Bidders, Font of Bid, Form of Contract, Plans. Specifications, and Forms of Bit Bond and Performance Bond may bi examined at said office and at the office of the Architect-:, Malonc am Williams, Salisbury, Maryland, and copies thereof obtained upon paymen of $10.00 for each set. Any biddc: upon returning such set promptly ant in good condition, will be refundei his payment, and any non-bidder up on so returning such set will be re funded $5.00. The Board of Education reserve the right to waive any infprmalitic; in or to reject any or all bids. Each bidder must deposit with hi bid security in an amount of not les: than five per centum (5 r /c) of the base bid in the form and subject t the condition.: provided in the Infoi motion for Bidders. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as t conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to b paid under the contract. The estimated cost of the work t be performed under this contract i. $7,500.00. No bidder may withdraw his bii within 45 days after the actual dati of the opening- thereof. BENJAMIN C. WILLIS, Supt. of Schools. December 8, 1938. PUBLIC SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE Under and by virtue of competent authority, I, the undersigned, will offer and expose ut public sale in front of the Court Hou-e Door in the town of Dcnton, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 13,1938 between the hours of 2 and 4 o'clock, p. m., the following described property-- No. 1. ALL those two lots or parcels of land situate, lying and being in the Third Election District of Caroline County, State of Maryland, on the west side of the Dtnton-Williston County road or Fifth Avenue Extended, BEGINNING at a point 200 feet south of Fountain Avenue, 10 feet west of paid Denton-Williston County road, and at the corner of landa belonging 1 to Sallie E. Trazzarc and runs south 100 feet parallel with said road; thence runs west 200 feet to a 15-foot alley; thence runs north 100 feet to lands belonging to Sallie A. Trazzare; thence with the same 200 feet to the place of beginning, containing about SEVEN PERCHES of land more or less, being Lots Nos. 6 and 7 on plat known as Towers and Redden Land, which said plat is duly of record in Liber T.L.D., No. 69, folio 673, one of the Land Record Books for Caroline County. IMPROVEMENTS: Large dwelling equipped with water and electric lights, garage and barn in good condition. No. 2. ALL that lot, piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Third Election District of Caroline County and described as follows: Beginning for the outlines thereof at the northeast intersection of Maple and Sunnyside Avenues; thence with said Maple Avenue and in a northerly direction a distance of 200 feet; thence at right angles with said Maple Avenue and in an easterly direction a distance of 166 feet to a 15-foot alley; thence with said alley and in a southerly direction a distance of 200 feet to Sunnyside Avenue, thence with Sunnyside Avenue and in a westerly direction a distance of 165 feet to the place of beginning, said lots being Nos. 35, 36, 37 and 38 on the plat above referred to. No. 3. ALL that piece or parcel of land situate, lying and being in the Third Election District of Caroline County, State of Maryland, and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the west side of Maple Avenue a distance of 50 feet north of Sunnyside Avenue; thence with Maple Avenue in a northerly direction a distance of 100 feet to Lot No. G5; thence at right angles with said Maple Avenue and in a westerly direction a distance of 160 feet to the Carter land; thence with Carter land in a southerly direction and parallel with Maple Avenue a distance of 100 feet to Lot No. 68; thence with Lot No. 68 in an easterly direction a distance of 160 feet to the place of beginning, being Lots Nos. 66 and 67 on the plat above referred to. ALL the above land being the same land devised to Carrie Deen by ths Last Will and Testament of William H. Deen, which said Will is duly of record among the Will Record Books for Caroline County, and being also the same land devised to Elbert Deen by the Last Will and Testament of Carrie Deen, which said Will v duly of record in Liber J. H. C., No. 13, folio 90, one of the Will Record Books for Caroline County. TERMS OF SALE One-third cash on day of sale, balance in two equal installments of three and six months, respectively, deferred payments to bear interest from date of eale, and to be secured to the satisfaction of the undersigned. W. BREWSTER DEEN, Attorney. James Temple, Auctioneer. · AUDITOR'S NOTICE CALVERT C. MERRIKEN, Assignee^ vs. MARY WHEELER and WILBUR W. WHEELER, her husband In The Circuit Court For Caroline County. In Equity. No. 3491. Upon an order passed in the above entitled cause on the 23rd day of November, 1938, by the Circuit Court for Caroline County, in Equity, these proceedings are referred to the Auditor of this Court and I, as Auditor of the Circuit Court for Caroline County, give notice this 25th day of November 1938 to all judgment creditors, lienors, assignees or person.- claiming an interest in the equity 01 redemption in the above entitled case to file their claims with the vouchers thereof with me on or before the 27th day of January, 1939. WILLIAM J. RICKARDS, Auditor. (ll-26-4t) Our Business Has Been Built On Prompt And Courteous SERVICE Established Over 27 Yean you Equitable Life Insurance Company Home Office, Washington, D. C. Raymond R. Fisher Agent DR. F. J. WRIGHT OPTOMETRIST Denton, Maryland Eyea Examined. Glosses Furni.ihrd. HOURS: 0:00 a. m. Ut 6:30 p. m. Phone 61 For Rent All my farm buildings, consisting of G-room house, barn, corn crib, hop and hen houses, garden, meadow ami 2 acres for truck patch. For rent in 1039. This farm is within 2 miles of RiiJgcly, Md. Farm land and woods is reserved. My automobile is for sale. Apply to DR. R. HACKETT, (11-12-tf) Churchville, Md. Funeral Directors Phone 126 Denton, Md LIQUID-TABLCTS SALVE-NOSE DROPS relieves COLDS Fever and Headaches due to Colds Try "Rub-My-Tism"-a Wonderful Liniment For Rent House, three acres of land, six dollars per month. RICHARD J. S. BULLOCK, (12-10-3t) Dcnton, Md. WANTED Good yellow corn. Higher cash prices paid. 0. A. NEWTON SON CO., (7-9-tf) Phone £651 Bridgerille, Del. ERNEST 6. COOPER .General Insurance The Oldest Established Agency On The Shore. Auditor's Order Nisi. CALVERT C. MERRIKEN, Assignee vs. JOHN R. MARINE, BESSIE P. MARINE, his wife In The Circuit Court For Caroline County. In Equity. No. 3496 Chy. Ordered this 5th day of December 1938, that the Auditor's Report, mad and filed in the above proceedings, be ratified and confirmed unless gooii cause to the contrary he shown within three weeks from the 10th day oi December, 193_8, provided a copy of this order be inserted in some newspaper printed and published in Caroline County once in each of two .successive 1 weeks before the 19th day of December 1938. WAYNE A. CAWLEY, Clerk. True Copy--Test: WAYNE A. CAWLEY, Clerk. Order Nisi STATE OF MARYLAND THE GOLDSBORO BANK In The Circuit Court For Caroline County. In Equity. No. 2949 Chy. Ordered this 10th day of November 1938, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by WARREN F. STERLING, Receiver of the Goldsboro Bank be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 12th day of January next; provided a copy of this order be inserted in some newspaper printed and published in Caroline County once in each of four successive weeks before the 12th day of December, next. The report states the amount of sales to be $1,650.00. T. CLAYTON HORSEY. Clerk. True Copy--Test: T. CLAYTON HORSEY. Clerk. Auditor's Order Nisi Order Nisi WILLIAM D. GOULD 3rd, Assignee vs. C. VICTORIA DEEN BUTLER and WALTER O. BUTLER, her husband In the Circuit Court for Caroline County. In Equity. No. 3507 Chy. Ordered thk 25th day of November 1938, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings made .ind reported by WILLIAM D. GOULD, 3rd, Assignee he ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof oe shown on or before the 26th day of January next, provided a copy of this order be printed in some newspaper printed and published in Caroline county, once In each of four successive weeks before the 26th day of December next. The report states the amount of sales to be $600.00. T. CLAYTON HORSEY, Clerk. True Copy--Test: T. CLAYTON HORSEY, Clerk. CALVERT C. MERRIKEN, Assignee vs. JOHN R. MARINE BESSIE MARINE, his wife In The Circuit Court For Caroline County. In Equity. No. 3495 Chy. DR. E. F. WITHERS OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN Phone 92 201 Franklin St., Denton, Md. Ordered this 5th day of December 1938, that the Auditor's report, made and filed in the above proceedings, be ratified and confirmed, unless good cause to the contrary be shown within three weeks from the 10th day of December 1938, provided n copy of this order be inserted in some newspaper printed and published in Caroline County once in each of two successive weeks before the 19th day of December 1938. WAYNE A. CAWLEY, Clerk. True Copy--Test: WAYNE A. CAWLEY, Clerk NOTICE TO CREDITORS This is to give notice that the subscriber of Caroline county, has obtained from The Orphan's Court for Caroline county, in Maryland, letters of administration on the personal estate of NELLIE PEARL WILLIS late of Caroline county, deceased. AIT persons having claims against the said deceased are warned to exhibit the same to the subscriber, the vouchers thereof legally authenticated, on or before the 26th day of May 1939, or they may otherwise.. by law, be excluded from all benefit of said estate. All persons owing this. estate are required to make prompt settlement. Given under my hand this 22nd: day of November, 1938. WILLIAM PENN WILLIS, Administrator. Subscribe for UM Journal. IN EV SPA PERI iWSPAPERI

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