The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois on July 3, 1914 · Page 8
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The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois · Page 8

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Decatur, Illinois
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Friday, July 3, 1914
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Page 8
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·i8sfes.su THv^jart- V--*, -.a, --· Page Eight T H E D E C A T U R R E V I E W Friday Evening, July 3, 1914. SMALL ARMY OF MEN AT MEETING Pledge Selves to Enforce Law in Dec»tur--Interesting Address by Mayor Batcheler. It was a most inspiring gathering In the big basement Sunday school room of the Flr«t Methodist church last night _500 men assembled at the law enforcement banquet, the music, the oratory the enthusiasm all contributes to make It one of the most remarkable meetings of the kind ever held in the | city It was no wonder that local speakers found it impossible to keep themselves within the f i v e - m i n u t e limit set by the toastmaster. I/50KED MKE ARMY. When the doors of the banquet room were -thrown open it looked like an army f t H n S in twn by two a n d somc- Hodv said that nothing short of a repe- I7.r ,, nf the miracle of the loaves and C« " d feed them. S e r v , n s 5 0 0 is no t r i f l i n g u n d e r t a k i n g but IT army of women unrti-r skil · ' AT SPEAKERS' T.VBI.K. At the weaker.' table wh.ch oc the ."£ fonnTTeats a f t e r the!r t, Mrtvlns was completed. , CLASSES OF MF.S. in. commenced. MEN PLEDGE SELVF.S. The Piece «e "sl**TM^^ '^ ^rayor arose, in San Francisco under Schmlt n n d R u e f f , w h e n Rudolph Spreckles, Henpy and Bums r a m e upon the scene, 01 Denver and other cities. Mayor Batctieler s^M he was nomln- n t e d for m a j o r of Marion by the Progressives and elected by Progressives, .democrats and Re publicans, Marion hnd been ostensibly d i y for six years and there had hf en a partial enforce- m e n t of the l a w . Thf bootlegger and the pppak easy in some shacks in the outskirts oC the town had been dis- o o \ e r e f t and p r o p c u t e d and given the l i m i t of the l a w . On the public square w a s a w h i s k y d r u g stoie which did business year in and year out, withou molestation and in whose basemen when searched were f o u n d twelve bar els of whiskv, three of gin and varl U B o t h e r k i n d s o f spiritous, v i n o u t , n d m a l t liquors. The rear end of thi tore was r e a l l \ a bar and t h e r e wer i n u m b e r of such drug 1 stores In th ·ity. ANSWER TO MAYOR. The m a ^ o r of M a r i o n i^ not only t h e 1 . h i e f executive o f f k e r of the city, but he is c h a i r m a n of the bonrd of puhlic w o r k s and the police nui£istrate of the otv. The M o l a t o i s of the c i t y laws are haled before* t h e m « \ or as judge ind answer to h i m dire* tly. A f t e r Ins i n d u c t i o n i n t o o f f u - e he called his po- 'ico force before h i m a n d one at a time from the chief down. He asked them If t h e y were in favnr of the enforcement of t h p law. T h e y were to a m a n . T h e v always are. He told t h e m he W.TS not so sine a b o u t i t h u t h e \voulrl t r y them. HE WAS FROZEN OUT. The s n e a k e r then told of hia fie;ht against t h o w h j s k e j d r u g stores, the rluhs. t h e gamblers n n d t h e r e d l i g h t d i s t r i c t For the f i r s t f o u r weeks of his term ns ma\ or there was not a word c a m e i n t o h i s o f f m e b u t cussing". There iverp h o w l s nf p r o t e c t , kick*;, c o m p l a i n t s a n d even supposed f r i e n d s of 1 is r-ame t i h i m fo ask him to jr« slow, tie -\\as mvol \ I T I S : r e p u t a b l e c i t i - zens in t r o u b l e t h e v = t iid. he wan stir r i n g up ton m u c h of a mess. HIT T H E M H A R D . The m ; i \ o r n s police j u d g e gave th proprietors of w h K k e i drup- stores a s e n t e n c e o f R I \ m o n t h s i n j a i l n n d $Sfln f i n e . O f t h e f i v e clubs i n t h e c i t y t h r e » nf t h e m T\ent out of b u s i n e s s w h e n \ v a i n r d . T w o persisted a n d they w e t c m \ ' f n j l i k e p e n a l t v . 6 m o n t h s nnd t n i i f t f i n * Tie got hold of the king b^e of t h e l i q u o r busines-:. Bill "Pugan. a n d the qu^'n bee of the red l i g h t dis- R. C. AUGUSTINE. Clev er and able toastmaster at big 1 a n q u e t of men MAYOR DAN One of speakers at big banquet . thus T.l-d«" 'hem^lves to 1 ti i ^ t There wci e a p p e a l s f i o m his r n u r f . rbarces nf v e n u e w h e n possible i n d f i n a l l y n ^ f p j s n f compronu.se. H i s i n c v er to t h e ^ p o f f e r s was that if i h e r e u e r e ompromise=? t h e v would havp to be mad* 1 m o t h e r courts, not n his. traveling D.catu, an Mr as well knows them well. KNOWS HTS SUBTECT. fc=VSHSf OTell wmcn ^^ thine about which to ttnlrt "-ha* h ' commences. TOKT OF TOWN? ^^mosT^nlficant fact in the fo r t h e police force is the f e a r that some of it might be used for paying sleuths and detectives. TTJFLE ALLIANCE. "It doesn't matter what form of government you have," said M a j o r Bateh- eler, "you will always have to f i g h t the devil. If o u try to enforce the law you will always f i n d yourself opposed hv the triple alliance of big: business, the p o l i t i c i a n s and the l i q u o r I n - terests. In conclusion he said: "It Is the d u t y of the a v e r a g e citizen to support all l e g i t i m a t e and honest e f f o r t s to enforce the law. It is his d u t y to see t h a t the cheap politicians who usually d o m i n a t e the government of cities are not elected to office. It is necessary tor him to understand the form of K o v e r n m e n t in his city. I know t h a t some in D e c a t u r dp not for I have t a l k e d to a n u m b e r of men who I f o u n d do not u n d e r s t a n d commission govern- m e n t You ouirht as average c i t i z e n s u n d e r stand something of the laws of evidence. A .mrv of twelve men faced a. j u d g e in Marion. The evidence was i n e v e r y way conclusi\ e hut they ret u r n e d a verdict for the d e f e n d a n t for U\o reasons. One was that the j u d g e did not give them i n s t r u c t i o n s as he should ha\ e done, and the other was that t h e y d i d not u n d e r s t a n d the laws of p v i d e n c e "If one fogy idea ts more general h a n a n o t h e r it is t h a t doing y o u r d u t y s a c i t i z e n Is going to h u r t your bus- ness. If you are a good citizen and p l i e v e in lap. enforcement you should o \ o u r p a i t toward law enforcement." ppsides the speakers the guests on he speakers' p l a t f o r m w«fp the fol- o w i n e : Mayor D i n n e e n . Commissioner Robt i n s . Commissioner R u t h r a n f f , C o r p o a t t o n Counsel B a l d w i n and Carev, ' h i e f of Police E. G. Allen, States Ato r n o v Tespo L, Deck. J. W. Carter, _ l o \ d W. P n e t l v , .Tohn Grlndol, H. P G e b h a r t , John Byrne, I. A. Buckingham, E. P. Irvine, A. -H. Mills, Rev. W. «TM government of A m e r i c a n cities j e.ch other." ORIGIN OF GRAFT. provemento * n * ne ' c . o j, j. n | B ?. to aay'oodle. Graft crept into the Armnent until It became a stench. ?i brought about the great triple al- lU^e between capital and politic* and «·· liauor Interests. Th" speaker described the regime o* Tweed in New York and the r of a- court house which -was . ha v« cost J800.000 and which actually cost thirteen millions and was not y '-.r«ed acquired the mayor of New k prOBecutlns attorney, judge' the government and finally the ' e judge*. So great became his Control that he openly flaunted graft Ja tn« faces ot the public and asked wtot they were going to do about it. Two yotmg men, Tllden and Jones .bowed what they were going to do !t*mt It Tweed finally went to. the where he belonged. rnri.DN'x rsn Bir.t The quest inns of honds came up .with 'he f i r s t n r r e s t for v i o l a t i o n of the a\v. lliH Dim-ail ^ a s the f i r ^ t to offer h i m s e l f -=s 1 nmisman "Xot eood 'nouprh for me." w.i ^ the police judge's answer K v e i v s u b s e q u e n t violator when jirrepted would sieae the telephone to call F i l l Dusan. "Not good epnueh," was J h f answer, "no use to call him " T h e n were o f f e r e d the Jce man and the t r a n s f e r man. HP gave It out as a. f i n a l i t y t h a t nobody finan- c i a l l y i n t e r e s t e d m the sale of l i q u o r would be accepted bv him as a boncls- m n n In a l i q u o r v i o l a t i o n case T h e v still s w e a t i n g out his sentences of fiiu-q n n d i m p r i s o n m e n t TfK GOT SOME TtTANKS. "For f o u r w p p k s T d i d n ' t know I hnd a f r i e n d in Marlon," the m a y o r said. T h e first v a r i a t i o n f r o m t h e c u s p i n ^ t h a t h a d been his lot- for weeks was a m e m o r i a l from a f a c t o r y d i s t r i c t in one corner of t h e city. T h i s thanked h i m for an i m p a r t i a l e n f o r c p m e n t of the law and was signed hy ISO men In that vlctnlt-y Then came congratulations and a b a n q u e t from the W. C. T XT., and from a law enforcement leagu* of t h i r t y - f i v e members. He r f c o g n i z e c in that list of t h i r t y - f i v e a n u m b e r o' n a m e s of men who harl been his critics in h i s p a r i v e f f o r t s at law enforce ment. Thev had m o r e l v veered with w h a t they heli=-vert was a chanprn i s e n t i m e n t In h i s law e n f o r - e m e u t e f f o r t s he is not supported hy tho ritv council, sale the. mavor of A l a r i o n . The council ha! made no a p p r n p i iation for the pay o: the police force. Thev have been pav ine the police without authority bu this course would no doubt be support er! hv the court? But he could If hi pleased dismiss the entire police forci of Marion for want oE f u n d s and th' responsibility for t h i s would have t ·t upon thi council. The allesci D. Stires, P. M. Lindsay, H C. Schaub C. F. E \ a n s and E. F. Stringer. DINXEEN CALLED ITP. Mayor Snj-s Law Enforcement ?« the Only Coarse. As the applause that followed the close of the address of Mayor Batchel- dcr subsided there were scores of calls for Mayor Dinneen. A f t e r a moment's hesitation. Mayor Dinneen advanced to the front of the p l a t f o r m and said that he had come t" h«i r the addresses of the e v e n i n g w i t h the idea t h a t he c o u l d learn and not with the expectation of h i m s e l f m a k i n g a speech. He had been gratified by the promises of support in enforcing the law. As some of the speakers had said the o f f i c i a l s of the .'ity could not do it alone. There must be a conslcleiable s e n t i m e n t in f a v o r of e n f o r c i n g a law. He took it from the speeches made t h a t one particular law was in the minds of practically all of those present, and that w a s the local option law. Then he said "It Is very d i f f i c u l t to e f f e c t i v e l y enforce laws of this k i n d w i t h o u t the moral support of the city. It is easier to c r i t i c i s e than to boost The police at best are greatly h a n d i c a p p e d . While no d o u b t c o n s i d e r a b l e v i o l a t i o n exists, I do not hcileve it exists to the e x t e n t t h a t some people i m a g i n e . I believe the police and p r o s e c u t i n g a t t o r n e y are using ev»rv e f f o r t to reduce to a m i n i m u m the violations. "I f u l l y agree t h a t the law should be enforced. W h e r e there is a division of h o n e s t opinion on a l a w , the nnlv wa: the public can i n t e l l i g e n t l y decide 01 its merits is by strict enforcement ol t h a t law. H a l f - h e a r t e d a n d e n p f f e c t u a l e n f o r c e m e n t not only does not give f a i r opportunity to decide, but does not satisfy any great n u m b e r on either side Under the commission form, the mavo has no part in the administration of any department, except that which is under him, but I am glad to. have this opportunity to assure you that as far as my authority and help goes, I will give that to the law enforcing department." IXDCALi SPEAKERS. Five local speakers preceded the :hie? speaker of the evening. They were Dr. J. C. Fisher. F. F. Lovett, Rev. J. W. Van Cleve, John Mattes and Attorney W. C. Outten. It was an all star cast, said Toastmaster Augustine, and every speaker was haopy and pertinent in his remarks. Dr. Fisher was introduced as a rnan who could really break the ice, an ablebodied speaker. It was found by the audience that Dr. Fisher really haosome rare ability as an ice breaker. He told some unusually good stories and concluded with some pertinent remarks upon the subject of the evening. F. F. Lovett was presented with some h u m o r o u s remarks by the toastmaster and responded with badinage which brought down the house. He said that he represented the 500 traveling men of Decatur, ninety-eight per cent of whom are wholly in sympathy with the purpose of this meeting. He spoke'of the difficulties of law enforcement and the necessity for assistance, encouragement and support on the p a r t of the law abiding citizens of Decatur. the enforcement of the law. We are all prone to look too lightly upon the aw and to evade it -whenever It Interferes with our particular purposes. Obediance of the law on the part of good citizens is necessary to the enforcement of the law. It Is our duty to obey the law whether we like the law or not. If it is a baa law, it is likely to be soon replaced if it is enforced TWO WOMEN IN BUGGY ACCIDENT Din. 91. L. Deck and Mm. Clara Breli- neman Slightly Hurt. Mrs. M. L. Deck, 1605 North Church street, and Mrs. Clara Brenneman o£ Cerro Gordo were thrown into a ditch from a buggy Thursday afternoon. They were on their way from the English L u t h e r a n picnic in Fairview park to Fairlawn cemetery when the accident happened. The buggy slid Into the ditch near the Wabash tracks and a wheel smashed, turning the buggy over. The women were more frightened than hurt. Both were slightly bruised but not seriously. Mrs. Deck's arm was badly bruised hut no bones were broken. Mrs. Brenneman returned to her home in Cerro Gordo this morning feeling little worse for the accident. Mrs Deck was up Friday morning feeling a l r i g h t a s i d e f r o m a rather painful arm. WHAT OTHERS SAID. Dr. Van Cleve said that he was asked to speak as a sort of curtain raiser. The danger was that when he got started he was likely to raise something else besides curtains. He had some clean cut ideas on law enforcement which he forcibly and clearly expressed. John F. Mattes expressed his hearty sympathy for law enforcement but said he did not believe in the necessity for raising f u n d s f i o m among the citizens for this purpose. There are men elected and paid salaries for tha,t purpose The toastmaster in part replied to this in his next introduction. The law enforcement organizations he said a.re merely the crystallization of law enforcement s e n t i m e n t and are a most necessary aid and support to the au- t h o r i t i e s in the enforcement of law More than that, they create a wider o n d more general s e n t i m e n t for law enforcement. \ - . C O u t t e n spoke of the necessity . law observance on. the part of ,ose who join in any movement for MEAT AND LARD PRICES STILL LOWER AT OKER'S Cut Rate Market, 605 N. Water St. Best grade sugar cured breakfast bacon; why pay others 25c pound when you can buy | ^ 1//2 f* the same, only -'- t ' *·· Danzeisen's pure lard (regular -| A'-Uf* price 15c), now only A" ^ Nice smoked bacon; also dry salt pork; at other markets 15c, here only Choice sugar cured corned beef (why pay others 15c when you can buy the same only) Choice tender beef steak (at other 1 Al/ 2 markets 15c to 20c, here only) -LU Choice beef roast (regular price 18c), now only Remember, these low prices every day in the week. 10' 2 c Both .Phones and Prompt Delivery. IN OTHER PLACES. Batcheler traced the parallelism be tween the Tweed rule In New Tork and the government of St. Louis tm- 4K ftgEfc"') « d - SuUej, When Folk Moving and Hauling Trunks--Boxes--Furniture Good Service, Low Prices, Moving Vans and Storage Davis Livery Co. 128 FBANKLIN ST. We Haul Freight j. A. SCHUMATE NEW CANDIDATE Oat for County Superintendent on Democratic Ticket. J. A. Schumate, principal of the Boody school. Is the latest candidate for the county superintendency. His f r i e n d s have urged him to make the lace on the Democratic ticket. Mr Schumate has been principal at Boodj for two years and previous to tha t i m e was p r i n c i p a l at Mt. Zion for three years. He is a graduate of the Decatur high school and of Normal. COOL WATER IN STATION FOUNTAIN A boon to travelers, station employe! and the p u b l i c in general has jus been completed by Superintended F r a n k Torrence of the c i t y parks whc has f i n i s h e d i n s t a l l i n g a new set o coils in the d r i n k i n g f o u n t a i n at thi Union station. The purchase and in stallation of the new ice water coil: cost about J40. The water at the sta tion has been warm d u r i n g all of th s p r i n g and summer because of defec tive coils. This Store Will Be Open Until 9 0 'Clock Tonight and Closed All Day Saturday. Sale of 1 50 Summer Dresses $1 .25 to $3.98 A timely purchase makes possible these prices on such high- class merchandise. For today and tonight we offer 150 new Summer dresses at prices which are certainly very low, quality considered. Any woman in need of new dresses, especially if you, are going on a vacation, will be able to save money by purchasing one or more of these dresses. Materials are lawns and voile and are made up in the new tunic and peplum styles. You'll appreciate these values now, by coming in to see them. $1.25 to $3.98 ········"·"^^^^^^ Barbey Cooper Wholesale Grocers Retail This Store Will Be Open All Day Saturday For Business. We will have plenty of fruit and vegetables of all kinds. Watermelons C We will have plenty of Cantalopes, Tomatoes and Peas. The Last Chance to Get Your Boy Ready For the 4th Do It Now And See Him Smile All the new novelties can be seen in our store. We have the largest stock in the city to select from and our prices are the cheapest. BALLOONS-ALL SIZES AND PRICES Kellington and Dieckhoff 345 N. MAIN " The Quality Store for Sportsmen" PICTURES 5c Any size print including 4x 5, printed on the highwtt grade paper. Leave your printing with us. Haines Essick 217 N. Water. Both Phones 1256.

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