The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois on July 2, 1914 · Page 8
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois · Page 8

Publication:
Location:
Decatur, Illinois
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 2, 1914
Page:
Page 8
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Page Eight THE DAILY REVIEW. PDBUSBED EVKRT DAT. THE D E C A T U R , R E V I E W »t the DecMur. DllooH. Poitortlc. The Review Publishing Co. DECATUR. ILLINOIS. OfflM In Review Bulldiofc comer of Mmln "J.ESJ.S'Sk -- »-- - «»"· MUlon *l tbta office. TERMS OF nil. ,««r (In »dv»nce; ·»» «li monthi 'In advance) 2JH) rhre* m"nth» (in sflrance) Per week. ' Tn« Ki-vli-w fines not knowingly nc-cepl WlV" or frmiHiil.-nl iuJvi-rMMng. or other ail- "rtl.mg of «n objection,!,:- ,,»t.. f e I'.v;|ry ndKirtliirin-m In IIP n.lumni. I" u r l n t r d n t h . on t h e p u r l o n n v rcpn b c n t a i i f l v e r t l s e r n e n t . who will be pleased to learn this. Lately In an adjoining county there was a partition s u i t that affected 160 acres of land. The lawyer who con- d u c t e d the p a r t i t i o n proceedings put In a b i l l for $1,200. The judge looked at It and e x c l a i m e d : "That's about 18 an acre; that's too much." The b i l l was cut some. Perhaps If the former owner of t h a t 160 acres hart provided for p a r t i t i o n in his will could at the same time h n v e pro- v i d e d an a t t o r n e y fee of $250. Anfl it m l e r h t h n v e been easy e n o u g h to get ii l a w y e r to do the w o r k for that i n u r h money. A t iiny r a t e there the*r r n r n p e n s a t i o n Th!ir.il» Kwntaic. ·'»'.» *· 1!l14 - J u d g e Johns' will. w h i l e t o r e m e m b e r It t n y o u r l a w y e r when you go a r o u n d is a p o i n t e r provisions of It may be w o r t h t h i s and mention aw In such cases roade plain. As the situation now stands, you can go upon the street and gather all sorts o f ( contradictory opinions in fifteen minutes. Of course when men trained In the law are unable to agree one may expect the "chimney corner" practitioners to run pretty wild. The matter long since got to the point where only the supreme court, the body w i t h the "last guess," can settle it.' Somebody in the Tuscola neighbor- ood reports f o r t y - o n e bushels of w h e a t to the acre, and this t i m e he happens to be a t r u t h f u l man in the newspaper business. Ours is getting to be a w h e a t country once more. h m e h i m d r a w y o u r will. I t m a y I h p t h i n g will not occur to him un- SF you .lop his memory. SubS'Tihers U-av t h e H u m m e r m a v t i m e mali.d t o t h i - m d a i l y ' t l n n a i r t i n r K f A r l d n -- i o f t e n «" " e , f - f n i v , l i ' i t n e w nhoul.1 I.e m i n i N o t l f v hv i ' h ' " i p or I T H E H K V I K \ V t h » c i t \ f o r T h e R f v l r w v i l h m i f a d d l ... . - h a n g e d a s L o t h "Id a n d ; H I ? I , I I card FTB. co. R a i n t h a t visits these spots should not be so timid and d i f f i d e n t . It will get j u s t as hearty welcome here as it can f i n d a n y w h e r e up or down the line. . A quiet Fourth is promised for Decatur and the surrounding neighborhood by city officials. The public p a r k s will be open to picnic parties, ana it is expected that all Decatur will seek the simple l i f e d u r i n g the day. There will be no noisy celebrations in any of the parks and fireworks during the evening will consist in sane exhibitions of fancy works. At the Country c l u b as usual the biggest exhibit will be seen. Members of the club expect to spend the day there. Hundreds are e x p e c t e d to spend the day at Farles park. | Snv»ra! now.pur-r a n d r o r |. !L a l dl-.'-ission n* to the f n u r s c Thnorlnr.- Kor.sp^It w n f " I l k c l v ' o p u r f i e a f l » r K - t t i n g - b a c k t o t h l . . - n . i n t r y from M - i = i u t h A m e r i c a n , r t r -v, m . ?-.. n i-1 T t h i n k t h a t h» w m i M «" ' h » l i ^ K '" f l i ' l l n g f a u ' t w i t h t h » wm ftr.". d o t h i n g ? A r d . er. an e a - i t e i n e d i t o r who n a l m ^ r l t o !vv,. a n I n t l m . i t e u n d e r s t a n d i n g "f Mr K,.o.=fV,.H f"H in dun hounri to t a k f pen in h a n d and ad.l a few sensible '.ires to the discussion ijoing- the r o u n d s Th1= was rall"d for In H i s t i P e to the ("n'om '. ' A NEIGHBOR'S IXFM'EXCB. T h e I l l i n o i s h i g h w a y commission' ! was to open bids y e s t e r d a y for roa.d h u l M t n e in t h i s state. In connection ' w i t h (hi? a d v a n c e story i t w a s m e n - t i o n e d t h a t I r o q u o i s county is f i r s t in the n u m b e r of miles it Is to build this year. Its t o t a l belns: about five miles. In tiie a m o u n t to be expended this year In road w o r k V e r m i l i o n c o u n t y » f i i s t w i t h s o m e t h i n g more than S 4 S . H O O Tho=e two c o u n t i e s were lead- i n g t h e procession. Why should these two c o u n t i e s lead all the rest of J l l i h o i s ? Iroquois is a ' o u n t y w i t h o u t any city of size. We h a v e n e v e r h e a r d it claimed that Iro- q u o i s leads in f e r t i l i t y of farms. It is a p l a i n average c o u n t y ; and yet in its wav it leads the good roads pro- And what is there in Vermilion county that should m a k e it lead in the T h l j eastern e d i t o r p r o t b» n o t i o n t h n t M r . R n . ste-1 a g a i n s t "vplt would come hom.« and 10 I P ' IPJ: sr.d f a . Hi f , r d ! n s ,ne,,t!"nf1 "iat M- twrVe b»«" r r e s ' d "" F t a ^ e p -ind t h o r e f o r ^ li m n l r t n l n Al?.. It wa* Th" d f f e n d e r R o o p r - v e l t h a d nf t h e U n i t e d :i'1 a d i m i t y to h e ' d f r r t h t h a t G e n t l e m e n who t a k e the school census do not surprise us w h e n they an- n o u n c e t h a t the population of D e c a t u r has got above the 40.000 m a r k . S p r i n g f i e l d is generous when it has a booster d a y ; H does something h a n d some for the b a t t i n g and rim average of the v i s i t i n g team. a m o u n t of money to be expended in r o a d b u i l d i n g t h i s yerfr? This county ha? the city of D a n v i l l e , a place of size and activity, but In o t h e r respects it is not t h o u g h t to m e a s u r e up with ind it w a s "iihaslz..! t h a t o-opie of , - s l i b r e «-m t i n d Fome- «!·!·'- f i n l t M K f a ' i l l w i t h d o z e r s of counties napiPd o f f h a n d . that m i g h t be The "sane Fourth" resolution t h a t c o u n t s is the one t h a t endures t i l l the f i f t h o f t h e m o n t h . OX THE RAILROADS. The Fourth will be observed by railroads o p e r a t i n g into Decatur by the closing of f r e i g h t houses and the an- n u l l i n g of all locals and drag f r e i g h t trains. Only t i m e f r e i g h t s and t h r o u g h passengers will be r u n , and It is expected t h a t the passenger business will reach a record mark. Special equip- m e n t has been arranged for all passenger t r a i n s r u n n i n g out of the city Friday and Saturday. On the Decatur division of the Wabash. all u n i m p o r t a n t stations will be closed for the day. HISTORY OF CIVIL WAR DAY BY DAY FROM THE PEOPLE. I- DEFENSE OP CANOE. Just a word in regard to the death of O r v i l l e Yates, who was d r o w n e d in the I l l i n o i s river Sunday a f t e r n o o n , ac- ccunt of the canoe capsizing or t u r n - ing turtle, in which h-- and his friend were riding. I wish to take exception to s t a t e m e n t s that i canoe is no safe place for the person who c a n n o t swim. 3 he person who cannot swim is as safe in a canoe as he is in j u s t any JTtY Z, 1864. The strategy employed by General Sherman whose army had been a f u l l m o n t h in f r o n t of the c o n f e d e r a t e defenses on Kenesaw m o u n t a i n , met with ntire success d u r i n g the day. The u n i o n leader had been unable to gain a f o o t h o l d against the confederate def e n d e r s w h i l e w o r k i n g from t h e f r o n t , and o r d e r e d a heavy movement to the u n i o n right where he saw a good opening for attack. This m o v e m e n t gave the entire u n i o n l i n e a c h a n c e to operate against the c o n f e d e r a t e position, and i n s u r e d 'Iterl f l j e D f O [ ' ' f t O " i z , ' r fl« n r « a ' ' v b i 2 n | m l t t i H t h e W O U l f l ' i a Mg rnan should W e l l . Ml R n o s e v e ' t j r g h T u e s d a v n i g h t p e n l n e a n d k e y n o t e ihe Then why are these two counties A\. t h e f r o n t In the first lap of b u i l d i n g good roads? Possibly it is because 1m- u i e i l l n t e l v on the east t h e y have the s t a t e of I n d i a n a for n e i g h b o r . They ) - a v e had good roads in Indiana 'or v e a r s , a n d ive c a n ' t t h i n k of a n y t h i n g else t h a t should exercise Iroquois and it TS h i s v e r m i l i o n c o u n t i e s so as to m a k e them viifl come :«T(i I l l i n o i s in the same work. thlrnr.0 t h a t | i t c a n ' t be t h e s e two counties lead o f f in road b u i l d i n g Just because once u p o n a Ions time t h e y had Joe Cannon as t h e i r chief representative. Acc o r d i n g to all the, prophets. Mr. Cannon got to be a back number. Road b u i l d i n g is s o m e t h i n g t h a t is at the f r o n t a n d of course is not controlled · ! ' t h i n g s h e i mere f a u l t I D Nlr R o n q o i. i n d t o as- ^du*t h i m s e l f op.t tO by has-beens. It m u s t be the I n f l u - ence of the neighbor to the east that i auses Vermilion and Iroquois to lead. WHY XOT EVERY YEAR! The report is t h a t the apple crop in 'ind the J central Illinois is to be light this year. f i r s t t h i n g I n 'he a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f P r e s i d e n t Wi!-o r to a p p - o v e ' If he- did he » l t h » r f a l d 'r m e n t i o n it or th* r e p o r t e r ? f a i l e d t ^ c a t c h h i m Did h» f i n d a « i n a l e t h i n * t o commend in t h e p o s i t i o n of t h r R e p u b l i c a n n a r t y ' %t ti r e p r e s e n t e d In congress The reporters f a i l e d to Roosevelt did TueB- He tounfl f a r t h i ff.t It W h a t WHP it d n v nlpM. at P i t t ; l t h - Democrat!'- n a r t |... the R e p u b l i - a n D«rtT altogether bftrt and ' i n t r u p t w o r t h y . and h* f o u n d t b » FroKr*?p!ve p a r t y to be the only ·mJvetton nf t h e c n u n t r y . All others ar" r-nd a n d rtnnz"m'i«, d r a l only w i t h a l t o g e t h e r hope- Pm- his »-fls t h e sinele b u r d e n of i that d e l i v e r a n c e on a s u f f i c i e n t - ly l o f t \ p ' a n e to please a majority or M p ' u r a l f t v of the people of t h i s c o u n - t r y ' If n man were r u n n i n g for alderman he -woulit Ret laughed at for ma-kinK s c a r n p a l s n plea of t h a t k i n d . "vT ourbt to rtflmartd s o m e t h i n g of men who are posod «!· r a n f l l d a t e s for president of the United 5=tate«. IBT THE JOHNS WILL. The f e a t u r e In the last will and test a m e n t of f h » l a t e .Tudee W. C. Johns 1p tint In whleh h » handsomely re- m e m b e r s th* D f t c n t u r and Macon count y hospital. ' B u t t h e r e I s a n o t h e r f e a - ture In the will w h i c h c a u g h t the at- t e n t i o n of n This 1« the ^"d many people. one t h a t provides for compensation of the executor and the attorney In settlement of the affairs of the estate. Smith E. Walker IB to he exe-cutor, "on condition that his compensation shall not exceed 4 per cent of the total amount of money coming to his hands." And In the sam* clause Hush W Housum is named attorney for the will "on condition that his fees as such attorney shall not «xceed J300." lr Judge Johns was well versed in the law and knew how to give it practical application. Ana so we take tt that Is possible for one making a will to ha.?*, a good deal to say about the ex- penie of administering, or executing. Perhaps there are a good many people Many large orchards to the south of us will not. have any apples; the best orchards in this neighborhood will have not more than a third of last year's crop. In this connection one Is Interested In the story turned In by E Wright Allen of Harrlstown. last year he harvested 1.300 bushels of one variety of apple: this year he win not get a. bushel off those trees. As a rule trees that bore well in h!.« orchard last year did not bloom this year. This is said to be something t h a t f r e q u e n t l y occurs In this part of the state. Is there any comnmndlng reason why an orchard In central Illinois should bear well one year and then lay o f f the following year? In the west and !n the east it li planned to have apple orchards bear every yew. One wonders why we can't have some-t thing of tha.t kind. It may be that something Is lacking in our soil, or it may be that moisture Is not had at the time needed. If there Is deficiency in soil we should learn what it is and then proceed te make It up. If there IB lack of seasonable moisture it «houlJ be practca to take steps to make up this. It is to be remembered that an acre of apple orchard bearing a good crop means several hundred dollars; there la Justification of expenditure to keep It bearing. The time will soon conr when It will not be accepted as a. mat ter of course that an orchard Is to bear only every other year. rlace else, providing he knows how to manage and handle his canoe. It takes just as much skill and m a n - euvering to h a n d l e a -canoe properly at, it does to drive a big a u t o m o b i l e through a crowded street. The u n s k i l l ed canoeist who cannot swim should f i r s t ascertain if his companion k n o w s how to h a n d l e a canoe properly before gclng out w i t h h i m , whether it be on a r i v e r or a pond. There are a gooc manv people who w i l l throw up their hands when a capoe is m e n t i o n e d . ] n',yself have been' out in a canoe at Al Fresco park on the Illinois river at Peoria as much as three or f o u r h o u r s at a time, using a canoe w h i c h I procured f r o m Kelly's boat l a n d i n g This is the same place f r o m w h i c h Orvillc- Yates and h i s c o m p a n i o n procured a canoe. I had with me a y o u n g l a d y companion who could not swim a stroke, but she was just as safe out in that canoe as she would have been on dry l a n d , for the reason that I knew perfectly how to manage my canoe, and id so all the time we were out. Every time a n y b o d y is d r o w n e d by canoe capsizing, it is blamed to the anoe. I want to say again that it is ot the f a u l t of the canoe, for one Is ust as safe out on a lake or stream i a canoe, as he is in any other larger raft, providing of course, that the nnoe hag the proper kind of manage- t c r y . A f t e r r r o u n t a i n , t h i u n d e r Genera day of d e f e n d i n g the whole c o n f e d e r a t e a r m ? Johnson evacuated thi u c s i t t o n and s t a r t e d moving toward Chattahoochie. Genera! Sherman dispatched a terse message to General G r a n t i n f o r m i n g him of the u n i o n vic- t o r y w h i c h read: "Movement on our right caused enemy to evacuate his position. We shall occupy Kenesaw at daylight.' NEW LAW FOR TEACHERS' EXAMS IN EFFECT JULY 1 Springfield, July 2--The state examining board, created by the new certification act of the last'general assembly, has completed the final details for the administration of the law which went into e f f e c t July I. The act raises the requirements for teachers, places the jurisdiction over examinations in the hands of the state examining board and makes other radical changes from the law as it now stands. Teachers at present employed will be certified w i t h o u t examination, but new teachers must take the test prescribed by the'examlning board. JULY 16 AND 17. The first examination under the new c e r t i f i c a t i n g law will be held July 16 and 17. A n y o n e who is 18 years of age or over or who will be 18 years of age before the next examination, is eligible to enter for this first examination, so far as age is concerned. The rules adopted by the examining board for the f i r s t e x a m i n a t i o n have been p r i n t e d and are being sent out in pamphlet form to those Interested, i The questions to be asked in the ex- ! a m i n a t i o n will be sent out to the county s u p e r i n t e n d e n t s in sealed envelopes, enough questions for a half-day in one envelope. The envelopes m u s t be opened in the presence of the applicants. A general average of seventy with a m i n i m u m of sixty w i l l be required for third grade elementary certificates, a general average of s e v e n t y - f i v e , with a m i B l m u m of sixty w i l l be required for second grade elementary c e r t i f i - cates and a general average of eighty w i t h a m i n i m u m of sixty will be re- q u i r e d for a f i r s t grade elementary certificates: The same grades will be required for high school supervisory, k i n d e r g a r t e n - p r i m a r y and a special certificate as for a f i r s t grade element a r y c e r t i f i c a t e . At the close of each half-day's ex- a m i n a t i o n the papers w i l l be collected by the c o u n t y s u p e r i n t e n d e n t , inclos- ed in envelopes and sent to the exam- i n i n g board. T h e c o u n t y s u p e r i n t e n d - ent has nothing to do with the preparation of questions or the e x a m i n i n g of papers. Applicants will be examined in the following subjects: Third grade -- Physiology, penmanship, grammar, reading, orthography, geography. L T . S. history, Illinois h i s - tory, a r i t h m e t i c , civics, state course. Second grade--Same as third and in addition e l e m e n t a r y science of pedagogy. First grade -- Physiology, penmanship, grammar, algebia, reading, or- ography, geographv. U. P. history, inois h i s t o r y , a r i t h m e t i c , civics, gen- al history and any t h r e e of the fol- wing:. Botany, Zoology, physics, icmlstry, p h y s i o g r a p h y , English, ped- ' school--Algebra, penmanship. Thursday Evening, July 2, 1914 · . _ L THURSDAY QUESTION COLUMN TVELLESLET MARSHMALIjOW FUDGE. Dear Miss lyeonard--I have often heard of Wellesley Marshmallow Fudge. Would you please give a recipe for it? Thanking you In advance. -Constant Reader. I hope this is the recipe you want; H«at up together a cupful of thin cream or rich milk and two cupfuls of granulated sugar. Add two squares of unsweetened chocolate, and boll the mixture u n t i l it will harden when dropped into cold water. Just before this i s done, add a small piece of butter. Have ready half a pound of marshmallows. and begin stirring these in when you put in the butter, crushing them up with the m i x t u r e and con- t i n u i n g a f t e r you take the syrup from the fire u n t i l the entire half pound has been mixed in. When well beaten.tpour into pans, so that the fudge mixture w i l l be about three-quarters of an inch thick. I believe the Wellesley girls cut these i n t o cubes. RHUBARB MERINGUE PIE. Dear Miss Leonard--I tried Mrs. G-.'s rhubarb pie recipe and f i n d it very nice. Maybe someone would like to try m i n e , ' w h i c h is made with a frosting. Here is the way I make It: I take two and a half c u p f u l s of rhubarb which has been stewed and sweetened as for table sauce, but it must not be very juicy. To this I add two level t f a s p o o n f u l s of corn starch which lias been dissolved in half a. c u p f u l of sweet milX; also, I add the yolks oi two eggs." I bake this in an open crust built up around the edges. (I. always use the old-fashioned, blue-rimmed procelain pie plate.) Aftar the pie is cooked and partly cooled, I beat up the two egg whites with two teaspoonfuls of powdered sugar and spread on top; t h e n b r o w n it in a moderate oven. Hope someone will report on this.-Mrs. R. S. S. GINGER ICE CREAJ1 Dear Miss Leonard--Could you give me a recipe for making ice cream flavored with ginger? I ate some once in a restaurant, and would like to know how to make it. Mrs. E m i l y H. TEN YEARS AGO TODAY IN DECATUR If you would be a canoeist, go out he first few times with your friend who knows the a r t , the same as you would if you were learning to drive n automobile, learn how to 'handle your craft and I am sure that you will never drown from capsizing a. canoe, In ny plaoe -where canoes are used. BBADBR. THOMAS A. QUINN IS BANKRUPT Springfield Register: -- Thoma* A. Quinn, owner of a cigar factory and a retail tobacco merchant of Decatur was adjudged a bankrupt yesterday in the United States district court. The petitioner gave tils assets as 11,341.07 and his liabilities as 81,215 9S. JULY J, 1804. TX S. Shellabarger was elected presi- d e n t and John Ullrich vice president of the N a t i o n a l Bank of Decatur. The r i g h t to lay tracks for the interurban railway on Fairvlew avenue from West Main street north 924 feet was granted the Illinois Central Traction company by the board of highway ·ommissloners. _ Receipts for the month of June were M.654.69 and expenditures were $15,434 50. One of the sales during the week was t h a t of K. H. Boby to Dr. B. J. Brown of a frontage of 50 feet on West Ma«m street at $70 a foot or $3.500. Plans were drawn for a. $3.500 residence at the corner of West Main and Monroe streets which Mre. J. Q. Badenhausen was to build. ONE CAR FOR EACH FAMILY Topeka. Kansas.--Th«r« will be a u.v- tor car for aver? family in this stats by June I, ISIS, if Kansans continue to buy lutojnoblles at the rate they bought them last year, according to Charles H. Se«s1on« secretary of etate. .. In a report Issued toda? he shows tha there are now 39.IW cars and .,-toO motor cvcles c a r r y i n g s f n t e licenses in Kansas. . "This means approximately one car to ey. ery eight families," Mrs Sessions said. J rear airo there was one for every ten fam lies At the rjresem r a t e of buying in 191 there "MD" CMJBS AND tAW. Rumors continue that, we are to hare many "Lid" clube here in Decatur. A the thlner IB told on paper, these are cluta with individual lockerl, each man to furnish his oivn drinks. There is word from the state's at torney's and the city attorney's of flees that If these clubB are attempted there -will he prosecutions. ' Also we are tola that these cases likely will go to the supreme court. There Is rumor that attorneys* of prominence are by no means able to agree as to what Is the law that will apply. It may be worth while to have the OPEN FRIDAY UNTIL 10 P. M. In order to give you ample time in which to fill your "over the Fourth" apparel needs. Closed All Day July 4th We Will Close Every Thursday Afternoon During July and August. KAUFMANS PL J** *^ OCCATUR ILLINOIS ^^ I find this recipe In my collection. J have never used It, but it appearg \ be a good one: One cupful of mil» three eggs, one cupful of sugar, a pine of. salt and two tablespoonfuls of flou Combine the foregoing Into a soft cui tard. When cool, add one Quart . cream and one email jar of Canton gin ger which ha a been chopped fine. Thei freeze. BUTTERMILK BISCUIT. Dear Miss Leonard--Perhaps somei one wtiuld like to try the buttermllli bisculti that are a favorite In my fam* Uy.--Stsan C. P. Sift logether three cupfula of flour* half a teaspoonful each of salt and bakinff BOda and one level teaspoonful of bakiig powder. Mix into thla a ta- blespootful of lard, using the finger tips or i spatula. Stir in, at the la«t. one gencous cupful of buttermilk and mix v e r \ _ q u l c k l y . Roll out the dougli ana cut rtund biscuit. Bake In a quick ov«n. Thke biscuit should turn out to be of veryjender texture. IKG BEEF SHANK. Dear Mi!, Leonard--I have to econo« mize my household expenses verjj closely. V n you please tell me aoma ch I could make good meat cheap cuts of meat--for beef shank?--Anxious e, Jc eepq ways in w dishes fro instance, Houseke Some tin^ ag^o several talks wer«j given on bw to cook be"f shante* First of alt the meat must be care, f u l l y cooked^with long. Blow cookinff, in order to teke it t h o r o u g h l y tender* ^tter taking'out most of the gristle, chop the mea while it is hot and you have a f o u n d a ( o n for a. variety of very tasty dishes. ^Meat and potato hash' can be made fcm this; also, beef cro-* quattes. scallcLrl heef; beef loaf, oq chopped beef oltoast. Various flavor* ings can be usl to giv e variety, such' as onion, tomal horseradish, parsnip. carrot and gree\ peppers. Do not fall co chop the beetjefore it gets cold, ir%. order that the toh parts may be well- cut up. Sa.ve idi beef drippings foa use with dry rn^ts. such as shank* flank steak, etc. \ L.BONAJU3. botany, American history and civics, A m e r i c a n literature, English literature, physics, manual training, agriculture, medieval and modern history, physiology, music, latin, English history, domestic science, bookkeeping. geometry, Germal ancient history, chemistry, zoology drawing, Spanish. typewriting, dom^ic art, physical training. Italian, French, physloK* raphy, stenograph! Gre^k. English and pedagogy. ' Model 4-10 $1665 Delivered Decatur Compare the Cole parts with any $2,000 or $2,500 car on the market. (1) Northway Motor-414x514. Three point suspended unit power plant Very few engines equal the Northway--none better. (2) Delco Electric Apparatus--The largest and best Delco system oni 'Absolutely the best. (3) Mayo Radiator--Same as the Pierce Arrow $5,000 ear. '(4) Gemmer Steering Gear--92% of the Racing cars at Indianapolis used th« Gemmer. Why? (5) Special Universal Joints--None Better, if as good. (6) Timken Axels and Bearings--On front and rear--abiolutely the best, (7) Stromberg Carburator--52% of the car manufacturers «ee the Stromberg. (8) Detroit Steel Springs--Absolutely Guaranteed for two years. (9) Janney-Steinmetz Seamless Gas Tank-You never heard of one leaking. (10) Hydraulic Pressed Steel Frames--Never give down. ;(11) Firestone Demountable Rims--Simplest and Best. (12) Warner Speedometer--The Best. (13) Collins Curtains--Simple and efficient--easily handles. (14) Rich Tungsten Steel Valves-The highest grade valve on any car. (15) Stewart-Warner Vacuum Gasoline Control-Will save 20 to 30% of your Gasoline bill. More efficient than any device on the market. You cannot lose more than a pint of gasoline if your carburetor floods. The most sensational device on the 1915 models. Now compare these parts with the equipment of any $2,000 or $2,500 car and you wflf be forced to admit that the Cole car is the highest grade car on the market at the price. Call and see this car. W. L. Shellabarger Sons Fire-Proof Garage EWSPAP.E.RS

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free