The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois on July 1, 1914 · Page 6
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The Daily Review from Decatur, Illinois · Page 6

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Wednesday, July 1, 1914
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Six D E C A T U R R E V I E W Wednesday Evening, July 1, 1914. 1 i ·T , THE DAILY REVIEW. KVKRT DAT. D»e«lur. Ullool* The Review Publishing Co. CECATUR. 1I.UNOI*. Offl«« !· H«vl-w UutMluii. corn«r at Main »4 North (irMll. ,, jlfl.eril«in« !·«!·· ra»U knowo on WPII- ·lion «t thl« offlc*. THUMB Or BUESCllirTION. DIM ytu (In «lv«ni-oi .moo M* month* On »fl rtif* 1 * month* (In f.T .. Tht f«U« ' full « hi - i v "I'.'w*"' III »lllt »ri ml' «* H « \ l » w tr frmiilu! n* "f ·'" ii»-ni' nt I: itifM' ii' ·' i.r ih* ml ' w til "' "i I I - ll'JIU' I .10 t*n nli tt 1 \'l?l It r vann«) ·Q»*nc«). ......*.··· i-n nut t « ..1 \ n r 1 1 j»i (Intuit rl.. .1 I T | · ' " i iUf *· HI ... ki ill 1 H [111 nr -I m W l n R l v ar itt. *·' °' '£ I t i l t O t f . t- n IIT uri'l n '. !*,, ni 'I hn If Uu on llm p«r Z.0r ttt .10 cepi ml v * L r Ih* In- W i l l t or .!nt i'1t f o r ir-*ri» t » ' n » iru I h e H M t n i i i ' - r n n v h . n n T h " K ' t i i ' W (,,,! ( , . lh"n i l n l l v w l l l i t m t n d i l l - ,, ,,, ,,... r n . I , ' H l " ' h "M n i i ' I , n f ·· T , l m " n fir t i n j t t m f i t r d . t a N r a on « disagreeable streak here In r r n t r n l Illinois we are not Inclined to net up m u c h of a dlnpute with anybody wlio claims to have nomethlng better In a n o t h e r section of the country. With hud weather the "Roods »re on us," and w h n t ' i the sense In trying to set up an n l l h i * If at such time we should get n h u n c h of claims from a man living on t h n e q u a t o r we would let It go on his Rit It Is d i f f e r e n t when pleasanter wi-Mthir mines along, as It sometimes Iocs even In the summer ueasoo. Now ivn have h u d a few pleaimnt days, and ·,o nrn i n c l i n e d to take up the w e a t h e r r h a l l e n m advanced by anybody who i. Give us a comfortable m't a d m i t ( h a t a n y b o d y u m v i h i - i t ' h«P a n v t h l n i ? on us In weather Of r o m f * ww are not Rolns t o ar- iru.' t h n point w i t h orio who sticks up r - r r l o r l d n , f n r he I K n o t t n o u r w e a t h . r cl'i^s. But If n n b n c l y In northern M i c h i g a n or In C a l i f o r n i a c l a i m s to sur- I'.i'.B us I" w e a t h e r ! ' l l K t i t B -- t h a t ts If PS t h * c l a i m we a r e having n v -- h e ran h a v e nn a r g u m e n t as «n e l i t h t - r t a v clock. sounds more like the truthful story they Bometlmes told In the good old pioneer days. If shower» are coming this way this week w« surely are entitled to recogni- GAVE ADVICE TO JUDGE ' JOHNS ON EDGE OF BED tion. TEN YEARS AGO TODAY IN DECATUR h 1 v *· "f m i e n "nil r » » ' i l i M Ml,-* f o r c n r h w f t)" 1 -i d In f h ' s r l t v . nri.! ·-!..· ,1 r » t !« « t»T « o n » r 4 l l v . It" " t» to b» n" f l r e w . r k * u n t i l t h « »v« o f th« ,rf In and pi · ·'1 t «!·* "f t ' r i r r r t T'-it lll a t t h a t I ' M i f ·.,r th" I'""'' Clil.f \!l.'t '"'"· iit "«n «·· r u l f « In* y««r, rt '.Iv'nH In t h e c'ty w w«|i *i"'iir«d by 1'i'H^ l t \ I i'I t n t « o n ? t h IT,,, i l . *«· 'I i ""I '· » r * u i. i : r i « ' r t « i 1 pr i ,,, i , r.. rd I f I t n ' V k i n I Ill KWS TO THK \ V r n l comes f i o m r h i c f l K O t h a t "f.'d- i l l i n c j i t l k - l t l o n o f t h e n l l e K - e r t melon t r u « [ 1^ bwlleveil tn h a v e reduced th*' oM of r n n t n l o u p e w . " F i g u r e s are cited .. « n i w mcloiiH n t i ' nellins for less ri.in \ now t h i ' n t h e y d i d a y e n r n K O . In f a c t It Is contend*, I t h a t melons f i t }.nl,.»n]e. a r e l i t t l e more t h a n h a l f t h e P ' 1 e of a y e n r fliso. H u t w h i t H l m i i t the, m a n w h o h u y f i a r l i ' n a t r e t a i l " H e Ip n u m e r o u s a n d rh H" s h o u l d be c o n s i d e r e d In the del i t -I i t l i - n s . I f h e I s n o w g e t t i n g m e l on* n t h . i l f t h e p r i c e of a y e a r aco. be iln.jn't k n o w n h n u t I I . I n f n c t h o h a « a n lmpri"«lc.n t h e prices n o w asked f o r n i e i . m * a r e i | U l l « f n m l l l a r , h a v i n g jonie l , i \ \ n t o b l m t h r o u g h s e v t r a l seasons. A r 1 i h e n tlu-re. Is o t h e r g a r d e n t t u c k t h n i « h m i M n o t b e o v c - l o o k e d I n a di°- |.|i»»lon o f t h i s k i n d T a k e h e a n K a n d pens," f o r I n s t n n c n . These n r e not h n d for le-n money t h n n a v e n r aKO. And l h e r « I n n ' t a n v l h l n g a b o u t t h e price n * « e d f o r t u m a t o e s a n d c u c u m b e r s t h a t l e i i i * one t o s u ^ p e i - t t h e m i l l e n n i u m Is p e . ' t i l t ' K n r ' . n n d t h e corner. H r i w i ' \ e r . v\ e who l i v e I n c e n t r a l 1111- n o n i r e I n r d l v I n p o s i t i o n t o tet u p our I' 1 ' 4 i - T p e r l i - n c e ss a u n m r i l o of w h n T p e o p l e a r e h n v l n f f I n t h e c o i i n l r y i t m i c e This y e a r w e have done n i l K h l v m t l e I n h o m e g a r d e n s ; a n d I t Is j n " s | y . ' v t r - i t h e c a u n p o f t h l f l t h e I n w r r p r i r e t'l"«'lni?Fi h n v e n o t been Fhoved TO S W I M . drowned at Feorin The s t o r y Is a July 1, 1804. In the election of officers for the Chamber of Commerce, Robert Mueller and Bernard Bradley were elected tor the long term, R. I. Hunt and C. A. Burks for the three-year term, and Byrd Davis for the one-year term. About 100 bushels of new potatoes arrived and they were Bold at $1.25 a bushel. Tomatoes w«je selling at 90 cents a crate. The Decatur Railway and Light company engaged Spencer's hand of Peo- rta ofthlrty-flve pieces to give a concert at Fairview park on the Fourth. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mueller and d a u g h t e r left for the southern part of I h p state. The price of corn was reduced one nt In the local markets, and the top price offered in round lots was 44 c n t s a bushel. HISTORY OF CIVIL WAR DAY BY DAY J u l y 1, 1884. A f t e r ft month's hard f i g h t i n g , at tacks, strategy and selge, union Gen e r a ] Pherman still faced General John son at Kenesaw m o u n t a i n . The entire o p e r a t i o n s nf a month had not suf ficed to dislodge the confederates from t h e i r strong position, and plans were m a d e t o c h a n g e t h e campaign. F o l l o w i n g this plan, a large move n i f n t was s t a r t e d in u n i o n forces to t h e r l K h t of the confederate position which it was hoped would make the s m i t h * r n e r s shift their defenses and p i v e t h e r e m a i n i n g union a r m y in f r u n t a n opening for a successful at- Mck. t vtB.B just ten years ago this coming October that Judge Johns told The Review about his meeting with Tom Corwin, the Ohio statesman after whom he wag named. Tom Corwin -nd Dr. H. C. Johns were old time friends. Tom Corwin visited Decatur in 1S61, ond that evening Corwin Johns called on Tom Corwin at the St. Nicholas hotel. The statesman was not feeling well and had retired early, but when his caller was announced, he had him sent In. He had Corwin Johns, then a small boy, take a seat on the edge of the bed, and after talking of various matters proceeded to prive him some advice. GIVES HIM ADVICE. 'Toung man," said Tom Corwin, "take an interest in politics and in public a t f a i r s generally. Know what is going on and be interested. Keep ourself informed and then make speeches, so that those who who not had y o u r opportunities' may also be informed. Be sincere in all that you may s a y ; get at the truth the best you can and tell only that. "Above all, do not be a clown. The misfortune of my life was that I could make people laugh. I have wanted to be president of the United States, and T could hr.ve been, were it not that I made too many people laugh. I can have anything I want In Ohio, but outside that state they will not take me seriously. "Do not be a clown That was the worst t h i n g that ever happened to me. At f i r s t I thought people admir- DINNER MENU FOR JULY 4 SANDERS TOLD OF HIS FIRST SHAVE ed me when they laughed at or with me, but that was a mistake. They only pdmired my ability to entertain them, and that is quite a different thing from regarding one ag a big man." FOLLOWED THAT ADVICE. Judge Johns followed that advice through life. He used to mak speeches. As Public speaker he wa s one of the best and was in demand as long he would accent such engagements He was sincere in everything he did or said. He was dignified -nd refined. On the bench he was at times austere, and never indulged in 01 permitted levity in the court room. Only once did he ever make a w i t t y remark from the bench, and then he perhaps found it Impossible to resist. SHE ASKED DIVORCE. A woman had applied for a divorce on the ground of desertion and after r.er a t t o r n e y had questioned her out anrt established the fact that the man bad been gone for a number of years he turned her over to the court for f u r t h e r examination. Judge Johns asked here where her husband was thf last time she heard of htm. "He was in his tomb," was the startling reply, and then the woman proceeded to e x p l a i n that while she was certain of his death, she wanted to be e q u a l l y certain that he would have no c l a i m on her in this world In case he should ever happen to return. T u r n i n g to her attorney, Judge Johns said, 'you'll have to take this cH?e to a higher court. Dismissed for want of J u r i s d i c t i o n " , WRITES OF TRIP TO CALIFORNIA GROCERIES OPEN ON JULY FOURTH he The F i n « T . i V . i ' l e . V n t e i i » M o n d e y a f t - r n o o n Oi..rt on f.- \t f t r n ·". wh*»n !t wl 11 !**»' jlnd n"w I" Oi« »«r»»nr» of np«»r i nan« oh WHAT A«nr*T I,OMIWlf 9*fiT*tBrT of l^.nr W l l » ' . n K ' l - 1 M nut *fc«* "PoHMy. I ' M m « n , o w n s i i - f»*tort*d." Th%t M I*'* r - n t T ' . ) f h n u i c M of til* remark** M* nour«« h* i,inr».^'!« t« mti"h * » l a b o » - n ' ! o M . T»i" * - » r n ' t « r v for n h** 1 t^-fTi r n n * h iTv'Uifl to t IOOK l h l « K M Wl*t m^clit * vf *"·· noi-lely Tin, quentlon Th* . \ n n n t f m s n d i d n ' t k n o w j i v w tn fiwlm, h u t hfl v e n t u r e d I n t o the I n t i n " ! 1 * r i v e r In a r n n n n wt-r floes one w h o c«n*t swim go Into .V'p-T w, i t e r I n n r o n n » " Tt la s o m e t h i n g i !· 11 in rlon« by t h o u s a n d s of people t \ . - r v R - i m r n e ' - r t a v , HTT! y f i It n l w a v s i n n k i 1"" I n k i n g a d e B p T a t r r h a n c e . \ '-inn** lit t h « most t r e a c h e r o u s t h l n ^ H M » t « n f i n d In w a t « r r r n f t . Thw least · i i r i l n « M" t h » ^ e n t » T of g r a v i t y l i k e l y u l l l rnnnf th« t h i n g tn tip over. E?pe- - I n l ' v In f M * t r n p w h ^ n t h e 'rnnoe Is n»..fl hy r"^ii!" who h n v * « n ' t prnwn up w |r*i u. w h h h I* * h r w a y w i t h p r a c 11. , ) ! ' · n i l w h l f p f n l k s of t h i s d a v w h o h t v * n M v t n a - I'·» m n k o T h e I n d i a n Is -i i hnrm* mH « t «»"»* In a r a n ^ f . l"it . · r. fl i t f i ' i t h* H «)tv, r ]v^ a man who i n «\r I m Th* on* w h n IP not a Rood swimmer · · h n n l d K A ^ P n ^ i \ f r o m t h e runoe. I f b« p»rt1n«nt. T V h n t j the f»cfirl«s ih«l f « l l t r-i»n. net wouM Ilk romlblr they belong to »· t" iio,-l«iv. Al n n y m t » w« " I" h»»« f s i i r » i « r r VMson '^ k l " w « on tl)l» phriM of the rrnohtle I n w r i t - A l e « \iif ift f " W ( ! n - » ntlice in-nln tl'*» rernnrk n i » n i » f f " ' ( t i r e f H of n ' J ' n r i H ' l iU.rf, t u t e » « n Tiwr* h*« »*"n I'»H* - noi;ti(l'".« th* mwn h-« !!)· JlK'iT-" 1 * t" b u f f c h l « * » B t « - ft»er» H mtirn of t h « u n m e t h i n g In -»n» It"* that ou» rnr*« to t n e n M m t T1 WHC true In th« m n n u f u f ' t i r * M* b l r v H e * m f f w yeftTH Flnr« M i f h i n - i n e r h n s b*en tndde i n the I In t h i « « o » n f T \ , \" 4 r r 4 « f»f m i l l i o n " t t A n r I 11 K h" 1 ' 1 "* -w. a n d a n M h n r noi f f h i ma'!" t r r f . t t ^ o r » u n » " Kol1 m f n l r t u , n n d \ f \ m n f e d Dial * ' V « r v ill ou( o f t h e i M ' t h l » n - t i m e " I t " ^ - i l n e . I t t A k i n e r ·' vi*-w "f tii n o t t r o v » i l ' K k t h e |ti««t-s ·Who IP iroltKT ' n » " ^ e r)tfir**t a n d n i n k c i h ' - n i or ond" \Ve I m a K l T i e i h n t P M T * « t n r \ \\'|]Hnn mere* t h n T o n H f t v H h i t l l dn r h l * oil 1\ f * | . K A R * % T VM'XTII!-:!!. A Phort w h l l * n i n r * t h l * r o m m n n H v WM regalerl w i t h « ' i m n i n n ) f " n t ) n n ( r nf former citizen* of t h l ( « p!!ir, ppoplc who re n o w H o J u u r n I n K tn Florida. Th«y W*TP w r l t l n f f ,|n*f to let us k n o w that when It rom*-* to M ' i m m p r Tt"«ortf they h n v p B o r n ^ t h l n R 'low n in F l o r i d a that beBtp w h i t we o f f o r her** in f*-n- tr») Illlnoln. It happened t h a t -it t h « t t m ^ thosp l»tt*r« rame we werf havln? a secplon of blistering hot ctayr M hen weather ftlly Ml Other Si ore* tn riuitrd on That Dnr- R I orprv stores tn D e c a t u r are i lie only associated business houses i\ hich w i l l remain open all day Satu r d a y . J u l y 4. Grrver.«r s t a t e t h a t w h e n t h e T h u r e l a y a f t e r n o o n c l o s i n g a g r e e m e n t w a s ·parherl among: t h e m It was decided t h a t n i l grocery stores w o u l d close 1 h u r e d a v a f t e r n o o n s I n J u n e i n s t e a d p o s t p o n i n g : the week 1 }* half h o l i d a y u n t i l July, t h u s both owners a n d rlerlis were satisfied t h a t the half hoi- d a y s made up for the two real holidays. Decoration d a y a n d t h e F o u r t h , s hich b o t h came on S a t u r d a y this . ear. The grocers did not feel t h a t t h e v rould a f f o r d tn close two S a t u r d a y s in the m i d s t of the season. OTHERS TO CIXSB. C l o t h i n g stores, d r v goods and shoe = tores, an^ other m e r r h a n t B h a v e decided to close all day P a t u r d a v . r- m n i n t n g open u n t i l 9 o'clock F r i d a y evening- to srtve shoppers time to buy n e c e n M t l e s f o r t h e h o l i d a y a n d S u n day. Each body of D e r a t u r merchants 1-1 «t in A d p verbal agreements an to hp closing, and the grocers a r e t h e u l y ones who report a c e r t a i n all day 411 f u r n i t u r e stores will close on r h u r s d a v a f t e r n o o n ? " d u r i n g t h e m o n t h P o f J u l v a n d A u g u s t commen^- l n J u l y **. and w i l l closs all day the Fourth. They wil] r e m a i n open u n t i l o'clock Friday evening. von nrt d e t ^ r m l n ^ d to I n n r n to run one, m n k « n B t n r t hv t a k i n g « w l m m l n g lesions, **nd k^*p t h » f » * n p u n t i l you feel » n t l r - l v at h o m e i n th* water. A f t e r t t n t n cnno^ m a v he r e n n o n a b l v safe. A. BOOSTER- 3n tha i l e a t h of VJ--R: H. Panders Dc- c n t u p lopea the g r p a f e p t a n d most per- s i s t e n t baswhsll b n o s t f r It has **ver had. A n d v* er** not n t a l l «ure t h a t a-ny- bodv *!«'* w i l l rom* a l o n g to fill his p i n re. T h f t k i n d of booster h^ was m i m t he b o r n ; he can't be made by t r n l n l n p c . Th*-re \t no call on newnpaperfl to m t I n n nn p f f o r t to spread the fame of v i r g S a n d e r s In t h i s community. He W H " one of the well and w i d e l y known nvn nf thr. trwn. This was hocaus« of j h » » w n r k he did a n d also t h « style tn w h i c h h» did t t . The moral to be pointed Is t h a t 1C a man w i l l d o h l « work well, better than H r n t o r t v *-1s*», he w i l l pret recognition . i i n l f n m e The n e x t m e e t i n g o f Three-I m i j r n a t e s will not be an cheerful as the M it one; Vlrg Sanders won't be there; a n d every one will miss him. Tt took the mediators but a few mln- n t p * to decide t h ^ r e wss nothing for t h e m except to recess u n t i l Carranza · ould h a v e t i m e to consult with Villa, tV"» man who engineers fill the flght- tnar Charles S. Mellon to that Boston grand Jury looks like a. man who must he Riillty of something; also everybody who has associated with him li an grave suspicion. Between blackmailing and jury brib- i n g how does the average and honest cltl/.en f i n d any chance to enjoy life in Chicago? Thirty busheU of wheat to the »cre When He l^ett for Mexico His Friends Did Not Porset Him. "Mavbe we can grin when we meet next time, hut we'd b e t t e r m a k e t h i s a good hand shake," said Vtrg Sanders to a f r i e n d on the dav of his Jpav- mg Deeatur for Xew Mexico. ' The good old days here have l e f t a smile w i t h me than they can't sponge off in any hospital, believe me," he con- t i n u e d . "They wouldn't care especial- lv to have t i l l s shouted, but tt kind of iggled next to me and I want to tell somebody. HIS FIRST SHAVE. 'You k n o w the fir- a t shave 7 ever had in a b a r b e r short, I got 'n Fred N o r m a n ' s place, a n d i t n e a r l y t i c k l e d to d e a t h . I felt l i k e a new moon w i t h my h a i r combed, a n d I w a n t e d i p l e to look. "Well, nearly every i\ I've got in D e c a t u r hns brer, i n t h e s a m e place, I guess, anil PO t h e v k n o w t h e cut of my coat there. Tt got 50 I'd mav be be s h o r t of change, need the i n t e r e s t on mv money or n o t h i n g a n d f o r n e a r l y t h i r t y y e a r p I h a v e been in the h a b i t of p a y i n g w h e n I bad the r i g h t slot open at the box o f f i c e . T h e n maybe once a m o n t h or RO, I'd in and pay on account, sometimes l e a v i n g this a m o u n t h a n g i n g over, a n d sometimes leaving- t h a t u n t i l It m u s t have f o o t e d up some. 'We 1 !, t o d a y I went In to tell the boys good-bye and get a, clean s h a v e and a f t e r w a r d s I went to Fred and asked for my bill to d a t e . " 'Vlrg. said he. 'you've been a good friend and customer of mine for t h i r - tv y e a r ? and y o u ' v e helped me out hen I needed it, and now you're sick and vou'll need all the monev you can handle. I guess we'll call y o u r bill paid, anyway until vou get on y o u r feet a g a i n and t h e n only 1C you want to.' That gives a man water in the e^es! "The rest of 'em were the same, o*"- f e r l n g a n y t h i n g thev had if I needed it. The best T can give them is crackers; and t h e y get back to me w i t h cake every time. Can you b^ame a man for h a t i n g to ipave t h i s town?" Asparagus Soup. Broiled Blue Fish. Puff Potato Balls. Green Peas. Dressed Cucumbers. Strawberry Sponge. Coffee. Sponge Cake. The above menu offers a suggestion for an easily prepared family dinner. The extra materials needed in Its preparation where six persons are to be served will be two bunches of asparagus, a four-pound blue fish, one bunch of watercress, six good-sized potatoes, two quarts of peas, one good-sized cucumber and one quart of strawberr.ps. The Fourth of July is usually the one day in the year when every American housewife feels that there must be a freezer f u l l of some cooling 1 mixture ready at all hours of the day to be served out to members of her own family or to chance guests. If it is desired, the strawberry sponge planned for dessert in the above menu may be omitted and ice cream served in place of it. Where it is desired that the holiday be observed as far as possible by all members of the household, plans can be made to have part of the d i n n e r prepared on Friday. The asparagus for the soup can be boiled on Friday and sifted FO that It only needs to be reheated and the milk added on Saturday. The m a i t r e d'hotel butter for serving with the fish can be made in advance as can also the cake and the strawberry sponge Recipes (or the dishes suggested are given below: ASPARAGUS FOUP --Cut the tops from one bunch of asparagus and cook these until tender in salted water to cover. Drain out and set aside as these are to be used whole for g a r n i s h i n g the soup. Cook the cut stalks t h a t are left together with whole bunch of "grasp" in a quart of water, or, better, of good white stock. Let it get thoroughly soft as this will eventuallly be strained. Slice an onion and fry it u n t i l golden brown in six le\el tablespoonfuJs of butter. Combine this with the asparagus and stock and cook together for a few minutes. Now thicken w i t h t h r e e level tablespoonfuls of f l o u r and cook until all flavors are t h o r o u g h l y blended. Then rub through a, sieve. This puree can be allowed to coil ar.d t h e n Mr. nad Mrs. William Pritchett Home By July 15, Mr and Mrs. William Pritchett, who are v i s i t i n g t h e i r d a u g h t e r , Mrs VT. U Jctt. in LOF Angeles, Cal., expect to r*ach home by J u l y In. They will take ·Alie n o r t h e r n r o u t e , s t o p p i n g at San Francisco. Salt Lake, Denver and Kan- pas City. Mr. P r i t c h e t t went to C a l i f o r n i a sev- Tal we^ks ago. hla wife h a v i n g gone p r e v i o u s l y . He w r i t e s as follows: "We have been e n j o y i n g our visit and. have visited every place of j n t e r - rst here in C a l i f o r n i a . "We spent a tew d a y s over at Catalina island and f i n d it a b e a u t i f u l place. We brought ba^k a pood tan and s u n b u r n , but our cnod t i m e o v e r w e i g h t s t h e p a i n f r o m Min M i s t e r s . "California, w e a t h e r is f i n e fc.r rest. Tt l s a great country to enjoy sleep at n i g h t , n e v e r too warm for b l a n k e t s n n d c o m f o r t a b l y w a r m all d a v i n t h e s u n . "The m o u n t a i n s and canyons are an i n t e r e s t i n g sight. W h e n on the top cf Jft Lowe. 7.0SO f p p t above sea level, ,ve could overlook the entire surround- ng c o u n t r y . ' B u s i n e s s !? booming here and e v T y t h i n g se-MTis to he progressing. An inusual a m o u n t of large buildings Is rlv completed and everyone here STRAW HATS Whatever style you may prefer--whatever height of crown or width of brim--you'll find it at "THE BO- . HON STORE." AND AS TO QUALITY--You'll find none but the better grades here--don't take it for granted that all straws are alike--because they art not--There's a great difference in the weave, the clearness of the straw, in the workmanship and in the trimmings. Straws $1.50 to $4.00 Panamas $5.00 to $10.00 Men's Silk Hats..., : ,.. .50c and $1.00 Boys' Straws -.. .50c and $1.25 Boy's Wash Hats 25c and 50c The Bohon Store will be open until 9.P. M. Friday night and closed all day Saturday. Both Phones, 1777. Eldorado and Broadway. re-heated the next day when It ihould be combined with a quart of rich milk.- which has just come to a boil. Garnish with the whole asparagus tops and season with salt and pepper. Serve croutons with this soup. BROILED BLUEFISH.--This may b« served with maitre d'hotel butter and garnished with watercress. To make the butter cream four rounding tablespoonfuls of butter with a knife and gradually beat in into it one tablespoonful each o£ vinegar and lemon juice, half a teaspoonful of salt, quarter of a teaspoonful of pepper and a teaspoon of chopped parsley. Rub or spread over the fish just before it ia brought to the table. · PUFF POTATO BALLS.--Mash tha potatoes after boiling- them and seas'on to taste. While they are hot, shape into ballp u n t i l about the.size of an egg and brush over with beaten egg. Flaca on a well-sreased tin and brown in the o%-en. These make an effective border for the fish platter when the fish is served at the table. The cucumbers mav be cut into thin slices and served with French dressing, separate. 'STRAWBERRY SPONGE.--This Is a delicacy which cannot fall to please tha taste of every member of the family. Soak half a "box of gelatin in half a cup of cold water until dissolved. Mash the q u a r t of berries, add to them half a. cup of supar and rub them through a slnve. Boil a half cup of sugar with a cup of water for 20 minutes until a syrup is formpd; add this hot syrup to the gelatin, take from the fire and then add the mashed and strained strawberries. Now place in a pan of ice water and beat for five minutes. Then whip the whites of four eggs and beat these into the gelatin mixture until it begin* to thicken. Pour into moulds and set awav to harden. (The yolks can be used for cup custards.) HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE--Beat the yolks of three ess? and add to them one cup of sugar and a teaspoon, f u l of flavoring. Add, also, four tables spoons of boiling water and after this, the s t i f f l y beaten -.i-hites of four egas. At the last, fold in a cuvj of flour wh eli has been wc-11 siftM. LAURA LEOXARD. Novel Honeymoon for W. H. Duerr and Bride. Mr. and Mrs. W i l l i a m H. Ducrr, who were married Tuesday e\enin6. l e f t after the ceremonv for Colorado Spring's, Colo. They will remain in Colorado for a m o n t h and T \ i l l livp in a cottage in the m o u n t a i n s On their r e t u r n to D e c a t u r t h - v rxp"-t to spend another Tponth in a Cottage at Furies park. 75 GUEST? T H E R E S e v e n t y - f i v e R u o s t s w e r e p r e s e n t at the w e d d i n g which tn,-k place a t th-- h o m e of thp bride's i n r e n t s , Mr ami Mrs C. H H a n d h n . ::2 \\~est W i l l i a m street. Rev. W. H P e n h a l t p E r n n p p r - tormed the r i n g c»r.-mony. JIis* H.imi- lin was e x t r e m r l v p r e t t y in a crown of w h i t e bride's s a t i n a n d a lorg ^ t i l . She ^" n s accompanied by M i f s Catherine Dighton of Monticello and Carl Duerr, brother of the groom. w.a.f best man. Robert Handlm Rugh, nephew of the h n d i . vn? rinp: hpirer. RECEPTION IS HELTV A f t e r the ceremony a reception was held and r e f r e s h m e n t s served. Mr. and Mrs. Duerr received m a n y p r e t t y pres- cnts. Mr. D u e r r is expecting to erect a new residence on Vest Main street, across f r o m Oakdale. in the fall. , FRANK TORRENCE 59 YEARS OLD Han Been Park Cuatodlan Here tot FMteen Years. Frank Torrence, superintendent of the Decatur parks, will celebrate his f i f t y - n i n t h birthday, Thursday, July 2. Mr. Torrence has been park custodian in Decatur for atiout fifteen years, hav- i n g taken charge of th« park work lri 1300. He came from Bement to Deca^ t u r a few years before he took the park work. For a long time. Mr. Tor. rer.ce was in charge of government dredging work in the Florida everglades and other places. SCCCBSSFTL HERE. His work here as park superintend-. int has been very sucwstful. He has hi en i n f l u e n t i a l in e n l a r g i n g and beau- t i f y i n g Decalur's park eastern very m a t e r i a l l y since he tnok charge. H« Ins al«o done a great deal towarda t'r.e e s t a b l i s h i n g f t public playgrounds tor c h i l d r e n In th» rltv. and is one of the most popular men in Decatur ,'imong the small boys with whom he comes into contact in the parks and playgrounds. Largelv through Mr. Torrence'e «f« forts. D e c a t u r now has the reputation; of baring one of the best park sysJ terns of any city of its size in tha Etate. BIG SPECIAL

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