The Daily Mail from Hagerstown, Maryland on August 8, 1939 · Page 3
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The Daily Mail from Hagerstown, Maryland · Page 3

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Hagerstown, Maryland
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Tuesday, August 8, 1939
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Page 3
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THE DAILY MAIL, HAGERSTOWN, MD., TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1939, 'ELSIE' BACK WITHtiRCUS Fugitive Elephant Lured Back Into Captivity With Russell Bros. Show. Two-ton Elsie, fugitive circus elephant, was lured back into captivity yesterday after a-safari o 200 police and country folk had stalked her through the foothills o the Blue Ridge Mountains near Staunton, Va., for a day and a half Elsie, footsore and hungry, had plodded through the forests'south of Staunton for 33^ hours' since escaping from a wrecked, trailer belonging to the Russell Bros. Circus, which showed here last Thursday. She walked quietly from the woods with two fellow pachyderms by her side. They had been freed to entice her from her hideout. Fright engendered by the wreck that killed a circus attendant and another elephant was gone when the fugitive found her mates, and she quickly was loaded on to another trailer and started on the way to Roanoke, Va., where the circus is showing. The two elephants whose presence induced Elsie to surrender had been chained in the vicinity, a half mile north of Mint Spring and a short distance west of Route 11, since early morning, but when this failed to attract Elsie trainers decided to liberate them for the decisiA r e attempt. She came back just like any good circus elephant, ready to eat her peanuts. But it was an exciting night and day while it lasted. After the •lephant had hidden away Sunday ftnd Sunday night, trampled fences and possibilities of greater damage aroused authorities to new methods. An airplane was brought Into service and Elsie soon was •potted not far from where the tractor-drawn trailer, from which •he escaped, had gone into a ditch. The hunters picked up the trail •ml followed her for or five miles • cross country. They didn't get too close, however, because Elsie turned upon three of her more daring pursuers and chased, them up a tree. From then on it was a waiting game until the fugitive decided the jig was up. • Murray Franklin, with Beckley of the MomUnin State league, had the highest batting average ,in the minor loagne last year. It was ,*-.'>9. EYE OPENER for breakfast Start the day right with rich, refreshing tomato juice. Made from famous vine- ripened Jersey tomatoes. Equally tasty at lunch or dinner. HurH HURFF TOMATO JUICE YOUR POULTS Deserve the Best. CONKEY'S Y. 0. TURKEY DEVELOPER Grows Them Out T'nwtor. HOWARD'S T T. ItnUimoro St. Dhone »0« THREE THE GAY THIRTIES WARNER BROS. THEATRES MARYLAND LAST TWO DAYS A TRULY GREAT PICTURE! BORROWED TIME LIONEL •ARRYMORE •If* CEDRIC HARDWICKE ••!•• • '•• H^l .1 • l»*l • Mil SEE IT FROM THE BEGINNING FEATURE PRESENTED AT—1:20-3:20-7:20-9:25 ACADEMY STARTS TOMORROW ERROL FLYNN DODGE cmr GOOD NEWS MAN £IT£S DOG -CATCHER 8-S A!! RlEhii Flenei-vud by The Ap F-at ERWIN STAR AT HENRY'S 'It Could Happen To You" Now Playinfc At Popular Theater. MacKinley Winslow, a young idvertising man, arrives home rom a party, finds a murdered 1 voman in his car and asks his wife md the •world to believe hiiii in- locent. This Is the explosive beginning of the thrill and laugh filled mystery comedy, "It Could iappen to You/' showing last times oday at Henry's Air Conditioned Theatre. Stuart Erwin gives a made-to- rder portrayal of Winslow, a good- latured, mild-mannered fellow vho wouldn't harm a fly—yet whom he world believes to be guilty of nurder. Gloria Stuart is seen as Winslow's 'oung and glamorous wife who hinders at every move in trying o free her husband—yet who affles the police In the final round vith her crime detection. Others in the cast are Raymond Valburn, Douglas Fowley and Paul lurst. Edison's "Bright Boy" Turns To Spiritual Work MOVIES' FIRST FAMILY TAKE OVER MOVIELAND The Joneses—t.he movies' first Ainily—make merry in Moviehind \ their latest 20th Century-Fox 1m, "The Jones Family in Holly- •ood." and what a time they have! n the hilarious picture which pened yesterday at. the Academy 'heat re. AT THE MARYLAND Heart-warming laughter, homely nuna, gripping suspense and in- piring imagery join to present ne of t'he most nnusunl and icmorable motion picturrs ever roducod in "On Borrowed Timr," crooning at (he Maryland Theatre. Ten years after Thomas A. Edison picked Wilbur S. Huston, (pic- lured above) in a national contest, as "America's brightest'boy," Huston is shown in 'Hollywood, Cal., where he disclosed that he is now devoting his time not to science—but to spiritual work. Huston, now 20, is working in the interests of the Oxford group's drive for "moral rearmament." Huston won a college education in the. Edison contest, and elected to study engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. • : VIoler Is Elected Brunswick Mayor All incumbents in Brunswick's ouucilinanic positions went down o defeat yesterday in the annual lection. Albert G. Moler defeated Ernest T,. Main, for 11 years councilman form'the first ward: Claude K. Orrison ousted Anthony B. Hedges in the second ward and K ft. Bowers. Sr., won over Chester Phillips in the third ward. Citizens cast, a total of 976 votes. No especial issues were raised in the campaign. CONTINUOUS 11A.M. to 11 P.M. KEEP COOL AT THEATRE LAST TIMES TODAY r SEE IT...and you'll laugh for days afterwards! Y. M. C. A. Junior Band Program Tlie following program of music, will be given by the Y. M. C. A. Band, at the City Park, this evening at S o'clock. Edwin C. Partridge, Directing: PROGRAM 1. March — Hipprodrome ...................... Huff 2. Overture — Gala Night .................. Chinnett 3. A Little Bit of Pop— (A curt comedy concocted from Pop COOK the Wenso.l) 4. Selections from the musical comedy LOUISE — Fulton 5. Spanish Serenade — La Paloma ............ Yradier 6. Selections from the MIKADO ............ Sullivan 7. The Bells of St. Mary's .................. Adams 8. March — Maryland ...................... Mygrant Star Spang-led Banner KEEPS UP WITH DAUGHTER. BOSTON (/P).—"Mrs. Roaini Carissimi doesn't kiss her daubster goodbye any more when Olga leaves for classes fit Boston University. She goes along. Both are taking a Shakespeare course. Mrs. Curissimi's an unclassified student and says she likes going to school with her daughter. WED. — THUR. — FRI. LAST DAY "The Jones Family In Hollywood' VitHrdlcUGlEN EX-CHAMP Tom BROWN-Non GREY Constance MOOR! $5.95 An "Arch Preserver" in White Kid — An . Offer of Unusual Value in Bentz & Dunn's AUGUST CLEARANCE SALE SEVEN CANDIDATES IN GOVERNOR RACE JACKSON, Miss. Aug. S.—Mississippi voters today will p;o to ihe polls and provide the answer to the State's most.- unpredictable Democrat to primary campaign in recent history. Never has Mississippi had a gubernatorial race with so many candidates—seven—or so little fireworks. The campaign has been devoid of personalities and practically devoid of issues. Consequently candidates have been received with lack of warmth at their rallies Geologists say Tex;is has been on the bottom of the sea three limes in hidstorv. CLOTHING for men and women ... on EASY CREDIT TERMS PEOPLE'S STORE 67 w Wash Street OFFICE EQUIPMENT Hagerstown Bookbinding & Printing Co. TELEPHONE 2000—2001 Record Number On U. S. Payroll Civil Employes Of Government Placed At 925,260 During June. WASHINGTON, Aug. S.—Officials reported Monday that the number of civil '.mployes in the Executive civil employes in the Executive branch of the Government reached the highest point in history'during June and that Congress during the session just ended appropriated $260,937,376 «iore than the President budgeted. The Civil Service Commission placed the number of civil em- ployes in June at 925,260. The figure compared with 919,161 last December when the extra Postal workers were employed, and with a war-time peak estimated at !)18,000. It included administrative em- ployes paid with works program funds, but not rauk-and-file WPA workers. Employment for the month showed "the usual seasonal increase," the commission said. The Budget Bureau reported, meantime, that Congress had appropriated $10,472,354,914 for the current fiscal year, which it said Avas $2(50,437,376 more than the budget estimate. In addition, it said the legislators had appropriated $1,013,582,439 for deficiencies of previous years._ The budget estimate for the present fiscal year, which the bureau said had been, exceeded by Congress, did not include President Roosevelt's proposed lending program, which as first put in bill form, called for an outlay of $2,800..000..000. This item was omitterl from the budget estimate on the ground that it would have been financed by RFC, rather than Treasury, borrowing. Both Democratic and Republican leaders in Congress have estimated the session's appropriations at sums different from that given by the Budget Bureau. ' Senator Barkley of Kentucky, the Deni»cratis leader, said yesterday that the total was less than $10,000,000,000 not in- cludiug reappropriatiotts of money appropriated previously but still unspent; while Rep. Taber (R., N. Y.) said the lawmakers had appropriated $14,061,598.619, which he called the greatest sum in peacetime history. The Budget Bureau's total of 1.940 appropriations was exclusive of contract authorizations, reappro- priatious, unexpended balances and other funds made available for spending. In its report on employment in the executive branch during June, the Civil Sen-ice Commission said the number of civil employes had increased 22.14S from May and that the payroll had gone up $3.731,534 to a June total of $140,140.533. Climber Rescued, Dies Of Exposure Estes Park. Colo., Aug. S (/p).— Rescue workers, fighting through snow and hail. Monday reached Gerald Clark, Denver mountain climber imprisoned more than 19 hours on a narrow ledge part Avay up a 2,000-foot precipice on Long's Peak. 14,255-foot mountain. Clark was lowered down the precipice but he died, apparently of exposure. The 30-year-old Denver man Avas marooned on the ledge yesterday afternoon. Eddie Watson, Clark's companion, made his way down, summoned aid and helped in the rescue efforts. FARES to NEW YORK for The FAIR ROUND TRIPS IN COACHES TO NEW YORK 35 WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS SUNDAYS AUG. 13, 27 SEPTEMBER 10 EVERY WEEK-END 40 Go any Saturday — Returning Sunday following dote of sal*. Tickets Good on Thest Trains (Eastern Standard Timu) Lv. Hogeritown • . . 1:24 a. m. Ret. Lv, New York (Penna. Sta.) 7:15 Of 11:25 p. m. 60 -doy round trip I Good any da ip In coacNei $11 30 ly, any train I I Ai your train glidei into Pennjylranio Station, N*w York, you »f«P into waiting foil which whiifcj you To >totion on Fair Groundi —10 minutes—1C ccnti each way. THIS IS FARM WEEK Something doing every day Contests! Features! Aug. 11 — 4-H Clubs Day Aug. 12—National Grange Day. Orr The Glamorous New York Worift Fair OLL The greatest Spectacle it thi Fair RAILROADS ON PARADE Aik «9«nrf tor dnaitt and about •e*namic«l louri wilh hot*! •«ommo^oti«n* I« Mow York PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD r eift • r> • i j» TO * •) • . r> * •» • British Military Mission To Moscow Here is the"Big Three" of the British military mission, which will begin series of conferences with, the Soviet general staff in Moscow in the near future. Left to right: Major General T.G-.G-. Heywood, commander of the royal artillery; Admiral Reginald Plunkett-Erule-Drax. of the royal navy. Air Maff» shal Sir Charles Burnett. The mission is to work out a military plan of action for the armies ot Britain, 'France and Russia in anticipation of military alliance between" the countries. fC.P.) Establishes Right To .$25,OOC Income NEW YORK, Aug. 8.-—A dark- eyed Turkish beauty who fled from a harem at the age of 17 established in Supreme Court Monday her right to $25,000 a year from the Fleischmami Yeast millions. The former Lemma Izxet Pasha., daughter of a grand vizier of Turkey, married Carl 'Fleischmaun Holmes in 1933,., and when, they Avere divorced in 1935 he made a settlement of $25,000 a year. Recently he tried to annul the arrangement on the ground she was already married to a Hindu. Jarmain Dass, Avhen she married him. Her lawyers traveled half way around the world, collecting evidence in New York, France, Belgium, England. Egypt and India which satisfied the court, in her behalf. CLASSIFIED ADS point the way. to the home 1*011 Avant. lake, tiie ftifa Root to. tke. VIRGINIA SEA-SHORE Horffilh and Old Paint f 4 ROUND TRIP CHESHPERKE STEflmSHIP IB. 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