Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on January 28, 2000 · Page 3
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Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 3

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Ukiah, California
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Friday, January 28, 2000
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Page 3
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THfUKIAH DAILY JOURNAL Arts^Entertainment Lois O'Rourke, entertainment editor. 468-3522 FRL JAN. 28-SAT.. JAN. 29, 2000 What's playing TONIGHT -• OKLAHOMA! - Performance of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic American musical by the Ukiah Players Theatre. .Ukiah Playhouse, 1041 Low Gap Road, Ukiah. 8 p.m. $10/$12. HOW TO EAT LIKE A CHILD - And Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown-Up). A musical romp though the joys and sorrows of being a child. Performance by SPACE, Near and Arnold's School of Performing Arts and Cultural Education. Men- ,docino College Center for the Visual and •Performing Arts. 7 p.m. $10/$7. TUBESTEAK JONES - Debut and CD .Release Party. Brooktrails Community Center, Brooktrails, Willits. 8 p.m. . THE ED REINHARTTRIO- Presented .by the Swing Dance Club. Harrah Center, 150 Baechtel Road, Willits. 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. $6 members/$8 non-members. ; FREE COUNTRY DANCE LESSONS -California Shooters 720A N. State St., 'Ukiah. 7:30 p.m. . -ALL REQUEST DJ- California Shooters, 720A N. State St., Ukiah. 9:30 p.m. DJ DANCE PARTY - Featuring D.J. Srriokin 1 Joe. The Ultimate Dance Club D.J. Featuring dance music mixes, all styles. Perkins Street Grill Lounge, 228 E. '•Perkins St., Ukiah. 9 p.m. No cover. j STEVEN BATES & THE ABORIGI- j/VALS -Pop, rock and blues. Caspar Inn, .•Caspar. $5. SATURDAY • OKLAHOMA! - Performance of the 'Rodgers and Hammerstein classic Ameri»can musical by the Ukiah Players Theatre. iUkiah Playhouse, 1041 Low Gap Road, •Ukiah. 8p.m. $10/$12. r ' HOW TO EAT LIKE A CHILD - And • Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown-Up). ; A musical romp though the joys and sor- <' rows of being a child. Performance by : SPACE, Near and Arnold's School of Per• forming Arts and Cultural Education. Mendocino College Center for the Visual and Performing Arts. 2 p.m. $10/$7. TUBESTEAK JONES - With the Green Tambourine Band at the Haldane "for I Supervisor benefit. Redwood Valley '; Grange, Redwood Valley. 7:30 p.m. ALL THAT JAZZ - Featuring the Barbara Curtis Quintet with Paula Samonte in : a benefit for the Habitat for Humanity for Inland Mendocino County. Saturday After: noon Club, 107 S. Oak St., Ukiah. 7 to 11 ;p.;m. $10 (includes wine, music and • dessert). • MEDEA - Performance by Coup de • Theatre Potter Valley. Potter Valley High ; School Little Theater. 8 p.m. $6/$5. • ALL REQUEST DJ - California Shoot! ers 720A N. State St., Ukiah. 9:30 p.m. > MIDNIGHT SPECIAL BAND - Over I40s Dance. Ukiah Senior Center, 413 • Leslie St., Ukiah. Bring finger food to '. share. Dance 7:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. $6. • 462-4343. : SMOKIN' JOE - The Ultimate Dance ; Club D.J. Featuring dance music mixes, all • styles. Perkins Street Grill Lounge, 228 E. ' Perkins St., Ukiah. 9 p.m. No cover. ; MICK TAYLOR - Guitarist from the ; Rolling Stones. Caspar Inn, Caspar. $20. SUNDAY OKLAHOMA! - Performance of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic American musical by the Ukiah Players Theatre. Ukiah Playhouse, 1041 Low Gap Road, Ukiah. 2p.m. $10/$12. CHAMBER ENSEMBLE - Featuring members of the Ukiah Symphony and Symphony of the Redwoods - violinist Adrienne Casco, cellist Abigail Summers, clarinetist Eric Van Dyke and pianist Barbara Le Lievre combine works by Rebecca Clarke, Darius Milhaud, Witold Lutooslawski and Peter Schickele. Mendocino College Choral Room 3 p.m. $10/$5. MONDAY i UKIAH CHAMBER PLAYERS '.fiEHEARSAL - Ivory Palace. 7 p.m. Call '. &72-9116 for information. TUESDAY :: FREE COUNTRY DANCE LESSONS (California Shooters, 720A N. State St., ftkiah. 7:30 p.m. *: ALL STAR KARAOKE & DANCING - iHosted by the house DJ "Smokin 1 Joe." •Perkins Street Grill Lounge, 228 E. Perkins !$t.,- Ukiah. 9 p.m. WEDNESDAY '.MEDEA - Performance by Coup de ; theatre Potter Valley. Potter Valley High 'School Little Theater. 8 p.m. $6/$5. ;•• CLASSIC ROCK W ROLL NIGHT including karaoke. Perkins Street Grill Lognge, 228 E. Perkins St., Ukiah. 9 p.m. 'The Hurricane ' Once a promising boxer, Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's (Denzel Washington), dreams are destroyed when he is sentenced to serve three life terms in prison for a crime he didn't commit. Washington gives strong performance By ROGER EBERT T he key moment in "The Hurricane," which tells the story of a boxer framed for murder, takes place not in a prison cell but at a used-book sale in 'Toronto.' A'T5-year-bTd"boy named Lesra Sperkjs.'25.Vieritk;to"buy his first' book, the autobiography of 'the boxer Rubin ;flLM REVIEW ;''- .;'*/ -''- "Hurricane" Carter. As he reads it, he becomes determined to meet the boxer and support his fight for freedom, and that decision leads to redemption. The case and cause of Hurricane Carter are well known; Bob Dylan wrote a song named "Hurricane," and I remember Nelson Algren's house sale when the Chicago novelist moved to New Jersey to write a book about Carter. Movie stars and political candidates made the pilgrimage to Carter's prison, but his appeals were rejected and finally his case.seemed hopeless. This film tells his story - the story of a gifted boxer (Denzel Washington) who was framed for three murders in Patterson, N.J., and lost 19 years of his life because of racism, corruption and perhaps most wounding - indifference. In the film, the teenage boy (Vicellous Reon Shannon), who is from New Jersey, enlists his Canadian foster family to help Carter, and they find new evidence for his defense attorneys that eventually leads to his release. The villain is a cop named Vincent Delia Pesca (Dan Hedaya), who essentially makes it his' lifelong business' 'to Harm . 1 _ , .,.. __ ( "Norman Jewison's film starts slowly, with Carter's early 'years arid his run-ins 'with Delia Pesca. In my notes I wrote: "If this is going to be the story of a persecuting cop, we need to know him as more than simply the instrument of evil" as a human being rather than a plot convenience. We never do. Delia Pesco from beginning to end is there simply to cause trouble for Carter. Fortunately, "The Hurricane" gathers force in scenes where Carter refuses to wear prison clothing and learns to separate himself mentally from his condition. Then young Lesra enters the picture, and two people who might seem to be without hope find it from each other. This is one of Denzel Washington's great performances, on a par with his work in "Malcolm X." I wonder if "The Hurricane" is not Jewison's indirect response to an earlier controversy. Jewison was preparing "Malcolm X" with Washington when Spike Lee argued that a white man should not direct that film. Jewison stepped See 'HURRICANE,' Page A-7 SfK2aMW*«M *-.; ass- i BILLBOARD Quartet concert set for Sun* Last weekend for SPACE performance "How To Eat Like A Child (and Other Lessons in Not Being a Grown-up)," a rollicking musical for families presented by SPACE (Near & Arnold's School of Performing Arts & Cultural Education) in cooperation with Mendocino College Community Extension, Rainbow Construction and the Valentic Family closes this weekend with two performances, Friday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Jan. 29, at 2 p.m. This talented cast of 30 young people ages eight to 15 appears at Mendocino College Center Theater, 1000 Hensley Creek Road, Ukiah. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for children, 12 and under and seniors, and are available at Mendocino Book Company and at the door. For information, call 462-9370. Second call for art entries WILLITS - The Willits Cultural Arts Commission is announcing a call for entries to all artists who would like to be included in the 8th Annual Benefit Art Show. This year's exhibition and silent auction will be held in the new Willits Center for the Arts Building for the first time. Seven years of community effort have come to fruition for the inland arts community with the opening of the Willits Center for the Arts for this, its inaugural event. Donations of artwork and services can be made at the Art Center, located at 71 E. Commercial St., Willits, at these times: Friday, Feb. 11,11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Mon day, Feb. 14,11 a.m. to 6 p.m. See BILLBOARD, Page A-8 The Daily Journal Members of the Ukiah Symphony and Symphony of the Redwoods will present a jazzy, spirited, romantic concert of works spanning the century Sunday, Jan. 30, in the Mendocino College Choral Room. The performance begins at 3 p.m. Violinist Adrienne Casco, cellist Abigail Summers, clarinetist Eric Van Dyke and pianist Barbara Le Lievre will perform works by Rebecca Clarke, Darius Milhaud, Witold Lutoslawski and Peter Schickele. The program will open with Milhaud's "Suite for Violin, Clarinet and Piano." Written in 1937, the piece begins with a light and cheerful overture followed by an animated divertissement. The third movement is for violin and clarinet alone, and the last movement starts with a somber chordal section followed by a vivacious section of glissandos and dance-like rhythms. Clarke's 1921 "Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano" is considered by many to be her masterpiece. Using basic themes repeated in different forms throughout the three movements, Clarke produced a work of sweeping lines, unusual power and passion. Following intermission, Van Dyke and Le Lievre will perform Adrienne Casco, Eric Van Dyke, Barbara Le Lievre arid Abigail Summers will perform in a Sunday concert. :.'. Lutoslawski's "Dance Preludes for Clarinet and Piano." These five contrasting pieces, written in 1954, use many contemporary compositional techniques - including changing meters and unexpected tempo changes - and produce moods ranging from somber to < v; v^ lous. '< •* Tickets at the dooi arc :,> •* and $5. Students through hig[» school are admitted free.

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