Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on December 19, 1977 · Page 6
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 6

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Hope, Arkansas
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Monday, December 19, 1977
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Page 6
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Page Six HOPK Names of 12 police officer* involved in fatal shooting* are revealed I »'•< tMnhf UTTLK ROCK <APj -- The namris of the 12 IjttJe Rock jx>- Iire officers who were involved in 10 separate fata] shootings during a four-year period have been revealed by Pro»;rutor I/* A Munson of IJtUc Rock Munson end the police department had declined until Saturday in reveal the names of the officers who had been involved in the shooting* in 197.V 76. Munson changed his mind and supplied the information after ft was requested by The Associated Press. Only one of the officers was I f*t«'X*l»»rft«4 iff «*, —. <- * I. -. — .....;, ,t u ,,, nun e umii tme shooUnR The officer, Charles Tuck, no longer la with the department. The two shootings in which Tuck WBJI involved appeared dissimilar and aroue under different circumstances. Neither Tuck nor the other 11 officers were member* of the intelligence unit, which shot Ijcon Neil Peltry to death outside the Dawson Drugstore in Uttle Hock on Nov. 8, 1972. The Pulaskl County Grand Jury recently relnvegUgntcd thai shooting and concluded that members of the special police unit acted without being accountable to civilian authority. That unit has been disbanded. In light of the grand jury's report, Munwm has begun a review of the 13 fatal shooting Incident* which took place after he became prosecutor In 1073. The names of officers involved in those shootings had been revealed in connection with two shootings which occurred in 1973 and one which occurred this year. Gale Weeks was police chief when Munson became prosecutor. In the middle of 1973, Weeks began the policy of not naming police officers who were Involved In shootings. The 10 In which officers were not named fell In the period between the storting of the policy find a shooting incident last summer. Weeks defended his policy on grounds that a shooting was a traumatic event for an officer and that some people In the community would harass the officer and his family if they knew who had fired the fatal shota. The 13lh shooting Incident ; since Munson became prosecutor took place last July, while the department was under an acting chief. The name of that officer, Patrolman Gary Evans, was revealed. Walter L. "Sonny" Simpson, who became chief this summer, «aid In an Interview this week that it would be his policy to reveal the names of officers Involved in future fatal shootings. But, he said he would not reveal the names of officers Involved in shootings before he became chief, He said that In the event of future shootings he might not reveal the names of officers immediately. He said he would do so after there had been "a reasonable coollng-off period" and when police were satisfied that their investigation was complete. Simpson said the length of a "reasonable cooling-off period" would depend on the facts of each case, and the complexity of each invc<>tii?;:tK<r; thing like th»t" against the police He said hf agrtH to release the information in dc-mon- strate that hLi office was not covering up anything Here is a summary of the 10 •hooting Incidents, with the niffnes of the officers revealed by Munson, and a summary of the witneases interviewed in connection with the incidents 1, Don Robinson, shot I>cc 30, 1973 by officer Alfred A Dawned in « disturbance at an apartment complex after Hob- Inaon allegedly disregarded a command to put down a weapon and fired a shotgun In the direction of Dawson. The witnesses Included three security guards for the apartment com- plet, two relatives of Robinson, and another resident of the complex. 2, Sam McCUUn. shot Dec. 14, 1973, by officer Debnar Johnson, who was on stakeout at a convenience food store when an armed robbery allegedly was attempted The witnesses included an alleged accomplice and a store ckrk. 3, Rock Terry Perkins, shot May 22, 1974, by officer Keith RounaavaJl, who was on stakeout at a liquor store when an armed robbery allegedly was attempted. The witnesses included three other police officers, the liquor store operator, a private security guard, and another man. 4, Octave L. Coleman Jr., shot Oct. 30, 1974, by Sgt. Bill Bates, who Is not with the department any longer. Colcman allegedly created a disturbance at a bus station, disarmed another officer and shot that officer, Injured a station clerk, and refused to put down the weapon after other police had been summoned to the area. Witnesses Included three other officers and 11 other persona who were paasersby, employes at the station, people awaiting Munson had honored the policy which Week* began In 1973. WeeJca said his policy was based on hia administrative powers aa police chief. No law requires that the names of officers Involved In shootings be made public. Munson's office, like the police department itself, has Investigated the shoot- Ing Incidents Involving officers. He said he had been satisfied, on the basis of the information available In each case, that police had acted with justification. No officer was charged or Indicted In any of the 10 shoot- Ings In which names had been withheld. Munson also on Saturday made public the list of the names and addresses of the witnesses Interviewed by his office or by police In all but two of the shootings. The work of identifying the witnesses from the files In the other two cases was not complete, but would be finished and the witnesses in these two cases would be available later, he said. Munson said he agreed to supply the Information requested by the AP because the activ- Ites of officers In the special Intelligence unit had raised questions In some minds about police activities. He said he wanted to make it clear that he was not on a "vendetta or any- Louis Untermeyer, poet, editor, dies NEWTOWN, Conn. (AP) Louis Untermeyer, noted poet, editor, anthologist and critic, died Sunday night at his home at the age of 92. Cause of death was not immediately known. Untermeyer, a high school dropout, was credited with bringing poetry to more people than any other American writer of his generation. Besides his own books of poetry, he wrote, edited and anthologized hundreds of others. Among his most popular anthologies were "Modern American Poetry" and "Modern British Poetry," both used as textbooks. He described poetry as "an effort to express the inexpressible in terms of the unforgettable." "Poetry must come by what Is called inspiration. A poem must hit you," he said. "The muse says don't call me, I'll call you." In addition to thousands of his own poems, Untermeyer produced some 90 books, most of them anthologies. He was a contemporary and friend of such noted poets and authors as Robert Frost, Stephen Vincent Benet, Ezra Pound, H.L. Mencken. Carl Sandburg and D.H. l^awrence. Born in New York City in 1885, he dropped out of high school before his junior year. Although he wanted to be a composer and pianist, he entered his family's jewelry manufacturing business when he was 17 and for the next 20 years devoted his days to business and his evenings to his literary interests. By 1922 he had published several volumes of poetry and parody. He resigned from his succussful business career in 1923 to devote full tune to writing. Ancient Metropolis Singapore, the independent city-state with a population of nearly two million off the southern tip of Malaysia, was a prosperous trade center in the 13th century. It dwindled as a fishing village of about 250 inhabitants until Britain's Sir Stamford Baffles bought it from the Sultan of Johore in 1819 and revived it as an international free port travrfcrs. or trsv'jrn awaiting « bill. 5, Horjiw D Shipp. shot Sept 2. 1974. by officer M. S Strark, after pr.iii'.«? arrived at a corv v*ntervr-«- fond store soon after ari Allf ?<"J rc«bb«?ry attempt. P» lice said officers blocked the path <i an apparent getaway car *nd that Shipp was shot after he and two (ithers tried to fire ors ff •','. \Vitne&«e« included 'wo Ri!?e<-'J »rcomplice." and three other citi7«-r;.v 1. Charles N Harris xi ,Jr . •srMOct 31. H'7< r,y Detectives ' W Jones and J (', Mande- viiic. neither <4 whom if. with th" department any longer Jlarnsffi was shot by officers on stakeout at a liquor store during an alleged robbery at- tempt. Besides the officers, the • rJy witness was 'he manager ••{ ! he hqjor store 1, B'-bby Comb:., shot June 30. 1975. by officer Tuck after "ffirers encountered an alleged burglary attempt -it a drug- s'jire. Witnesses included three "ther irfficers and three other citizens. 8. fief:" Kdward Shavers, shot July 21. 1975. by officers J. H F «;er and Tuck. -Aho were on stakeout on top of a building near the railroad yards when an attempt was rrvde to burglarize a boxcar and the suspects allegedly ignored commands ((j halt. Witnesses included two alleged accomplices and two other police officers. 9, I,arry Bruce Parker, shot 'jjy M i'?;5. b> >?f, t-r Fred L. B!a>! vk. who «;i* on stakeout at a liquor store after several robberies of the store. Parker was shot during an alleged robbery attempt after he alleged firvd at police when they ordered him to halt. Witnesses included three other people. 10, Waddell Johnson, shot April 4, 1976, by officer Billy Cobb while allegedly advancing on Cobb with a pistol and a knife. Police said officers had seen him leaving a residence where a woman allegedly was raped and her landlord was beaten. They said Johnson was ordered to halt. Witnesses included one women who lived at the residence and another who lived close by. family center HWY 4 NORTH, HOPE, ARKANSAS OPEN9AM-9PM for great ''holiday sound" ...and year-a round, too! SOUNDESIGN iiiminmiH,,,,,,.,..,, 3-WAY AIR SUSPENSION SPEAKER SYSTEM T . G . &Y . @ , y , B| _ ACK & W|)|TE TELEV|S|ON SET Two 10" woofers. 5" midrange, 3" tweeter Crossover network. 8 OHM impedance Walnut-finish cabinets. 26"x15"x10V Molded fronts MlCHO CASSETTE POCKET-SIZE T.G.&Y.- MINI CASSETTE Built-in condenser mike; auto, level control. 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HAMBURGER COOKER Convenient, fast 1 Gioat PORTABLE MIXER 3-speed mixer in STEAM/SPRAY IRON ' I your choice of white 25-vent steam and 'or gold. £j| QQ spray iron. WM24WH-HR 1459 I.G.AY.'s ADVERTISED MIRCHANBISEPOIICY «F92 FAMOUS-NAME WATCHES Men's & ladies'watches in a Christmas array of styles to choose fiom «603 24.88 pin> i pclK) is lo jl*i)i tij,c iJvdi.seJ list in 40(i;uilc uppi) in uui ikits In the ! idicil.stJ iiifiil.jncliit li no! lUiliblt Ugc tsttr, itisonv 1 G &V *>!! pioiide i Kjin ! GUI (Ompjii, mcichjndi e>enl the to unio'tsttn insonv 1 G &V *>!! pio>ide i Ch«ck. upon itijuetl in oidti thiuhe mt; b« pu.-chiitd Jl tin lilt puce »he« it tecun.es Itlillbli. 01 )ou mjj puichjit i uiij quiht) meichindiit it i sunilji pnct reduction It ii the poliC) ol IG it to ite tlul you <i< hipp) mth >oui «.- VIVITAR POCKET 110' TELEPHOTO CAMERA Normal & telephoto lens;built-inelec flash. 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