The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on December 13, 1899 · Page 19
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 19

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, December 13, 1899
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Page 19
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THE UPPER DES MOINES: ALGONA, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1899. 1878 1899 Sale Finds us with a bigger stock of better goods than ever before. Gold , Gold ruled, and Silver. and other fine stones. Also Solid Gold Jewelry. Fountain Pens, and handsome Pen Holders. a large assortment of the very lat- es t and most artistic cuttings. • i LOUIWBLSA WARE, the handsomest Jardinercs and Vases to be found in Algona. ' The largest assortment we have ever had of Sterling silver goods. A $10 Gold Filled Watch, with American movement, only $8.50 during holidays. A very fine line of OPTICAL GOODS. Glasses specially fitted by a, graduate optician, and satisfaction guaranteed in every case. SILVERWARE, solid and of the best plate made by the best factories. Considering quality — and quality has always been the watchword at our store — OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST IN ALGONA. Don't miss the old stand fot your Holiday gifts. E. G. BOWYER, JEWELER AND OPTICIAN, ALGONA, IOWA. . YDU MAY HAVE HEARD of the boy who, whenjasked to name the smartest scholar in'school, said he cotiMii't tell, as his father had told him never to brag. No room for doubt as to the boy's opinion. If we were asked our idea as to which is F.arm Separator on the market, our answer, while perhaps not so modestly stated, would be quite as clearly understood as that of the boy. In this instance, however, we shall try to appear modest, and let others answer the question that many of you have asked, We are pleased to refer you to the following parties who are using the Wm. K. Ferguson, W. H. Clark, F. G-. Strandberg, G-ilbride Brothers, Matt Dalziel, J. R. Mawdsley, T. J. Julian—and others. We carry these machines in stock at our place of business, near the C. & N. W. depot in Algona, and would be pleased to show them to anyone interested. We also have a large stock of black and galvanized pipe, pipe fittings, globe valves, a complete line of pumps for every purpose. We make a specialty of farm water works, consisting.of storage tanks, stock tanks, tank heaters, cisterns and reservoirs. , Our stock of Dairy and Creamery Supplies is complete. Do not buy anything in our line until you get our prices. Spurbeck-Lambert Co. Rosewall's Bakery is headquarters for CHRISTMAS GANOY The. biggest and finest stock of candies in Algona. Fruit cakes and fancy cakes of all kinds for the Holidays. Headquarters For Cookies, Bread, Cigars, Candies, etc., etc. C. DON'T FORG-ET OTTO NEUMAN'S when you are LOOKING FOR YOUR HOLIDAY GOODS. He is located at The Old Blackford Stand south of the Court House, and has Books, Toys, Fancy Stationery, Pipes and Tobaccos, Perfumes and Toilet articles. Children's Books, a specialty, also drums. A real Santa Glaus is in attendance, The daily papers and all the'magazines all the time. Don't forget the location. NSURANCE. Also Land, Loan anfl Collection Business.- Oface over Algona State Bank. Farmers' of Cedar Rapids, Phoenix of Hartford. Hanover of New York, Minnesota Fire, Minneapolis, Rockford of Rocfeford, Lloyd's Plate Glass of New York, United States Life of New York. GEO. IV!. BAIUY, GENTLEMANLY BRIGAND He is liotli Generous mid Klmlliriirtixl ' and Haft a IJottt uf Kriumln. A picturesque and humorous brigand Is Bernardo Viola, whom the Italian authorities are just now trying to catch. He is not an ordinary, vulgar cutthroat, but a gentlemanly fellow, who has a host of friends and who is described as being both generous and kind-hearted. Viola expects parish priests to support him, and, whenever he finds him self short of money he Informs the priests of the fact and insists that It Is their duty to supply him with the nee essary funds. The priests who comply with his request find Viola a pleasant visitor. He takes just what he thinks they can afford to give him and then he goes his way satisfied. Those priests, however, who refuse to comply with his demands very soon discover that he is not to be trifled with. Viola wastes no words on them, but simply lays hands on all the money and other valuables he can find in their homes and then makes off with them. Only once did he let anger get the better of him. That was when a sturdy priest tried to prevent him from plundering his home. Viola would not stand that, and so he promptly slew the unfortunate priest. Viola's great desire at present is to form a partnership with another bandit, named Raimondo Pace, tor whom the police are also looking. The two men are well known throughout the district of Aquila, and many think that for that very reason the authorities ought to be able to capture them easily. Viola, however, has many friends and relatives there, and whenever the police or soldiers show themselves these loyal fellows promptly send word to the bandits and thus enable them to get into a safe hiding place. As a matter of fact, too, the number of policemen in the district is entirely Inadequate, and the result is that Viola and other brigands do pretty much as they please. It IB said that some of these lawless men have been plundering for the last quarter of a century, and, if so, the chance of their capture In the near future seems rather doubtful. watch repairer use this device 'In the form of Iron, long bamboo and delicate Ivory. The bamboo chopstick was known In China 1,000 B. C., and shortly after this date the ivory form was devised. Their use is one of great antiquity in Japan, as attested by references to it In the ancient records of that country. One may search in vain for the trace of any object In the nature of a chop- Btlck In Central or South America. Knitting needles of wood are found in the work baskets associated with ancient Peruvian mummies, but the chopstick has not been found. Curious pottery rests for the chopsticks are exhumed in Japan, but even this enduring testimony of its early use is yet to be revealed in this country.—Appleton's Popular Science Monthly. Clilneao t.'liopat ick. With the evidences of Asiatic contact supposed to be BO strong in Central America, one might have imagined that so useful a devise as the simple chopsticks would have secured a footing. These two sticks, held in one hand and known In China as "hasteners or nimble lads," are certainly the most useful, the most economical and tbe most ettjcient device for their purposes ever invented by man. Throughout that vast Asla.n region, embracing a population pf 50,000,000, the chopstick is used, as a substitute for forks tongs, and certain forms of tweeaers Even fish, omelet and cake are separated with the chopsticks, and the cook, tne street scavenger and the How Are Your ISyebrow*. It Is popularly believed that If ones eyebrows meet it indicates deceit. Charles Kingsley Indorses this belief, but Tennyson has other Ideas, and poetically speaks of "married brows." In Turkey meeting eyebrows are greatly admired, and the women use artificial means to bring the brows to this condition, and if urt cannot induce thin eyebrows to grow they make up by drawing a black line with pjste. It would appear that t'.e Greeks admired brows which almost met, and the fashionable Inhabitants of Home out only approved of them, but resorted to pigments to make up the lack which sometimes existed. Some proverbs state that the person whose eyebrows meet will always have good luck, while others state exactly ihe reverse. The Chinese say that "people whose eyebrows meet can never hope to attain to the dignity of a minister of state," and in Qreece of to-day the man whose eyebrows meet Is said to be a vampire, while in Denmark and Germany it is said he is a werewolf. Sonnets innumerable have been written on the shape of the eyebrow, the arched style being preferred and styled by Herder "the rainbow of peace," because "when straightened by a frown It proclaims a storm." The old masters always painted the arched brow, and In speaking of his beloved Dante Bays, "The eyebrow, polished and dark, as though the brush had drawn It." A woman's eyebrows should be delicately pencilled and dark, though some prefer a contrast between the eyebrows and the hair.—Exchange. A curious incident occurred during B game of golf which wus being played on the St. Duthus course, Tain, the other day, a ball struck by one of the players coming into contact witn a' bird perched on a neighboring hillock and killing it instantly. Psyche—-Tilts is Christmas among the mortals. Cupid—Yes; I wish we fc&d a pair of stockings. THE HORSE SHOW. The History of NewYovk'H Chlof Society Event. The original projectors of the Horse Show bullded far bettor than they knew when they first met and arranged for their first display in 1883. The Idea of the Horse show was first developed In and among the then comparatively small element In the New York society world known ns "the hunting set," and whose chh'f headquarters then as now were Iu the saddle at Hempstead and Far Rockaway. The first five ihows In the old Garden were very modest affairs compared with those of the past six yesira, and the figures both, of the attand- ance at those and of their receipts look almost ridiculous beside those of to-day. But each year saw a steady Improvement In fr'ue attendance and consequently In tho receipts. With the opening of the new Madison Square Garden In 1800 the public begun to realize that the show afforded it an opportunity to Inspect the much- talkud-of and muc~ discussed bean- ties and leaders of Now York society at close range nnd to study their cos- tumei and gowns, with the result that they rushed to the Garden. Thi« show had its red-letter year In IK'Jii, although that of last year was almosi equal In the figures of attendance and receipts. As the years went by, tho demand for the best boxes became such tnni the premiums paid at the auction sales reached surprising figures, uniil upward of $600 was cheerfully given for the choice of a prominent box foi the week. The ticket speculators saw their opportunity in thla craze auu i frequently managed to secure gome of ' tbe best boxes, as well us the best ' seats. One of these three or four y»o.r» ago held a box In a good position at 11,000 for tbe wottk of Hit show. He offered It to Mr. Wllllan. K. Vanderbllt, who refused to puj such a price, but immediately afterward sold It to Oaptaln Do la Mar. | i'bif 1* the highest recorded price paid (or a box at tbe Horse Show. Until three years ago New York society made the show no inuca of Us own that It Intrenched itself In all the boxes and aspiring millionaires from other cities ware not able to break Into the charmed circle, although several attempts were madu to do so. Three years ago, however. Philadelphia secured a box, and tbe next year "*. Boston, Baltimore anil Plttsburg were represented. Last Autumn other cities held at least a third of the prominent boxes, Considered solely aa a social function, the Horse Show, not withstand' lug tbe fact that it lias oease4 to be a uovely and tbftt tbe interest of New York »ocley In It is somewhat wan- lug. Is still undoubtedly the most Important event of the year In the »o- <%ty wojrtd, as* owly of New fork, but of Awwloji, it is the Aav^t sea jm> W* iti society regulate, to A large extent, thalr time of returning to their city homes by It and date tbo events of tlio year from and by the show week. For It tbs matron and belle prepar* their most elaborate gowns, and tlie rann of fashion overhauls bis wardrobe and give* extra Instructions to his valot. : AH may be supposed, It Is the event 'of the year to the milliners and dressmaker* not only of this country, but also to BOino extent of London and Paris, for many workshops iu thonn cltU.'s are busied every summer on orders from American women fot Horse Show gowns. As Is natural, therefore, the show sets each year tb« fashion Iti Winter gowns and even la moil's clothes, and Is the Mecca of nil the leading milliners and dressmakers of the country who assemble at tho G union during the week to etmly their own and tlislr fellpw's productions and to got points for the Winter'* fashions. At the show the Winters', gayetle* are planned entertainments are organized, engagements announced,. and scandals whispered. It IB the llrst meeting day of the society clearing' ho 11 so after the long Summer and Autumn, and to a large extent It set* the pnco for tho six months to follow. The mornings of tha show are favored by the more enthusiastic mem- Dors of the hunting set and by th« children of society. About threu o'clock the advance guard of the fash-' lormble throng begins to arrive, and by four the boxes and prominent seats ar ; . filled with fashionably dressed occupants, and the public begins Us rounds of study and comment. At six o'clock the human tide begins to ebb as dinner hour approaches, and at eight It begins to flow back again. By 9:80 every night the function is at Its height, and at eleven the Show Is over. Then the fashionable restaurants and rafes are filled until long after midnight with the brilliantly dressed throng discussing the event* of the day. Tills Islund !« a Maynat. In the Baltic the Danish island Bornholm, which Is situated about 24 miles east by south, from the nearest point of Sweden, may be regarded as a huge magnet. Although the power of this magnetic island is not BO great that it can draw the nails out of ships, as was told of the legendary magnetic hills, the magnetism of the rocks on the island of Bornholm can and does cause .a good deal of trouble to ships In quite another way, for the island exerts such an influence on the magnetic needle that it causes a vessel to turn perceptibly aside from Its coursa. The effect of the island magnetism is felt at a distance of about nine ana a half miles . On the island of Canna (one of the Argyllshire Hebrides), situated about threo miles northwest of Rum, there is a hill which has magnetic* pp^er suptoleatly strong to affect tfca, poj»p|fs,es, of vessels passing

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