The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on November 22, 1938 · Page 6
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, November 22, 1938
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The Algona Upper Des Moines, Algona, Iowa> tTov. 22 y 1938 0 North Dodge Street 3. W. HAGGARD A R. B. WALLER, Publishers Entered as Second Class Matter at the Postofflce at Among which was to observe civil service, "We pledge ourselves to the merit system virtually destroyed by New Deal spoilsmen. It should be restored, improved and extended," says the platform. That means, of course, that democrats gen- First Place Award Winner, 1933, Iowa's Most Outstanding Weekly, Judged by State University of lown SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN KOSSTJTH CO.: One Year, In advance $1.50 Upper Des Moines and Kossuth County Advance In combination, per year „ $2.60 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUTSIDE KOSSUTH One Year In advance $2.50 Upper Des Moines and Kossuth County Advance in combination, per year $t.OO ADVERTISING RATES Display Advertising, per inch 35o Want Ads, payable in advance, word 2c "Let the people know the truth and the country Is safe."—Abraham Lincoln. ' BUSINESS CONDITIONS SHOWING RISE IN EASTERN UNITED STATES Just as the middle west was several months behind the east In finding that genera] business was slacking off, so Is the middle west a few months behind in finding that business is picking up again. Automobile manufacturers, a weather vane of business If there ever was one, signal the green light—a clear track to another era of good times. They must know what they are talking about. Couple that up, in our own section, with the fact that a new trade agreement with England is going to aid in finding a market for export farm products, and that the 1939 farm program is revised again to the better advantage of the producer, and we In this section should really feel that times are looking up. tlons simply because they are democrats. The platform complains of the number of persons on the state payrolls and promises to "eliminate political jobs, to the end that duplication of effort and a duplication of Jobs shall be eliminated and tax waste stopped . .. We will stop the needless spending of needless millions of the taxpayers' money." * * * Don't Molest Liquor Store Employee* Britt News: TWere is already talk that the men in Iowa liquor stores will lose their jobs with the changing administration. We are opposed to a change for these reasons. The democrats brought booze back, passed the liquor control measure, opened the liquor stores and filled them with democrats. As long as we can remember the democrats and liquor Interests have been associated together In Iowa. If John Barleycorn is the donkey's baby, let them democrats nurse him! * * » Democrat* Passed Many Good Laws Humboldt Republican: A dispatch from Des Moines says that the republicans of Iowa have decided that their first efforts will be to modify or improve the present democratic measures so that they will work and give the results that they were supposed to accomplish. It is a wise idea. Selecting the best that your opponent has offered is smart politics. In fact, it is mart in every walk of life. We have to remember that the democrats have inaugurated many admirable objectives. The republicans were thrown out of office because they failed. The lessons of the past should be an excellent guide for the future. * * * How About a Straight 26% Cut hi State Employees? Eaglo Grove Eagle: We would like to see Governor-Elect Wilson order a straight horizontal cut of 25 per cent in the number of state employees in every department supported by property tax- aton. Then If state business is being neglected, more employees could be added. But a straight reduction of 25 per cent would work out all right It worked when the Beatty-Bennett law was in effect and it would work now. There are huge pay rolls In the variou department at the state house and elsewhere in Des Moines. A rigid cut could well be made without injuring the state's business. A 25 per cent reduction would be a nice start And it could be done. LIGHTHOUSES DO A GOOD ?OB WITH ONE U6HT EV6N A. PRIZE-TIGHTER. CAN DO SON\E GOOD, EVEN WITH ONE LMAP OUT OTp- COMMISSION MOTORIST MUST HAV GOOD UQ44T6. TO DRN£ SAFELY AT NIGHT ety Council LOCAL OPTION NEXT SlfcroOLE IN SIGHT IN LIQUOR MANAGEMENT ARGUMENT Now that the State of Iowa has weeded out a little looss timber In Its state liquor control department so that seals for bottles go only where they are supposed to go—and now that the state stores are being quite efficiently operately in a dignifled manner and at a handsome profit for the sfate, we have the whole matter stirred up again. This time it is the question of local option. Under the local option plan, of course, voting would be necessary in respective communities to find out whether or not they wanted to allow the sale of liquor In their town. State control has Its faults, but It might be decidedly better than local option if the voting happened to be "wet". And under state control, nobody has to patronize the store If they don't care to. But every f ew years a new angle to the liquor control problem is brought up, and some always rally around the new cause, and away we go for another buggy-ride rff experiment and tampering with the question and its remedies. The MARCH OF TIME m. o. i. MX. orr. Prepared by the Editors of TIME The Weekly Ntwimogmine Opinions of Other Editors Where Credit Belongs EsthervlUe News: The progress that has been made in the propagation and protection of wild game illustrates how little government often accomplishes as compared with the private effort of individuals. Credit for much of the conservation work goes not to the government, its lawp or officials, but to the sportsmen and nature fans. They have exerted an Influence on government whicli has brought about a better conservation program and they have succeeded in bringing conservation laws to life. There would have been little of what has been accomplished during the pa»t ten years without an aroused public and credit for that goes directly to those in this community and other communities who have conservation at heart. Moreover, no program of game protection can succeed fully without public sympathy and this is true of all rules and laws. • * • Failure of Farm Program Marshalltown Times-Republican: Frank Kent says Wallace has admitted to the president complete failure of the farm program. The administration has no alibi to offer na it had when the supreme court invalidated the AAA. Perhaps we will have even more radical legislative proposals in ah effort to counteract criticism over the collapse of the Wallace program. * * * The Wa^es and Hour Law Hurnboldt Independent: The Wages and Hours act was supposed to improve the welfare of the country. But will it? To accomplish results it will navt to continue in employment cvtryonb who is now employed and will have to raise wages according to the schedule laid Gown. But what if the business involved tan not stand the increased cost. And again higher waga always compels higher prices. H.ghtr prices always mean reduced consumption. Reduced consumption means redured production. That means, in turn, leas employment Thus the act will create forces that will defeat its object. Again, increased wages alwaya force the sho'rMv erb l ? S "' k . 1 ! lbor -* avi "« Devices, so that ihortl> mechanical devices are doing what Was formerly done by human hands. » * • -More Tmtes Than WageM Northwood Anchor: It is claimed that the big oil companies of the United States, if they had to pay at the source all of the taxes r.jnne, tud with their product, would p»y 205 taxes at o,ie lime In connection with that story it is stated that in'1937 the SUindar.l Oil Co. of Ntw Jersey actually paid out more in taxes than in wages. And the trend of taxes is up. not down. It affects us all from the highest to the lowest. * * * Blamr* President and Wallace Estherville Vindicator: President Rooaevclt and Secretary Wallace compassed the defeat of democrats n Iowa and in the other states that went republican. The people «tre tired of the New Deal foolishness. If the conservative demovral.s had been heeded there would not have been the changes as brought about in Tuesday's election It is the prediction of this paper that the president will huve another program, one that is in line vvvth old line democratic ideas. * * » Republican* Should B*de*-fn Profru*.* Webster City Freeman: Now that the republicans of Iowa have elected a governor and lieutenant governor and will have a very large majority in both house and senate-a majority of 70 in the house and 26 In the senate it is up to them to redeem the promises made in their platform. Walter Shcllmyer, service man at Bjustrom's whose home was in West Bend, has practically been around the world. He served in the World War, and after the war and a fling at private business, returned to active duty in the Marine corps, being stationed in China. He has also been In Russia and many other points of the globe. * • * We are waiting for reports from a big turkey dinner, held In Omaha, Nebraska, at which Carl Morck had Alvln Zumach of Fenton, G. A. Wltt- kopf of Algona, Ewalt Voight of Fenton and Lll Wolfe and Florence Hintz of LuVerne as guests. An Omaha brewery served a banquet of 129 turkeys, cooked in beer. * « * Scouto tell us that Dick Post, when under pressure, can toss up as tasty a pie as the average woman cook. ' v » » » It pays to advertise! Last week Jlnimle Neville told the world In his ad that before he moved to his new home, his neighbors used to drop in and bring "a tidbit, now and then, but that in his new- location, he received no such delicacies from neighbors. Doc Jonse and Ed Rlst, the neighbors in question, thereupon joined forces and sent Jlmmie a nice, big soup bone, with accessories for making a sturdy gallon of soup. At last reports, Jimmle- was on a soup diet. * • • Ed Carney ha* a mystery he would like solved. He discovered two child footprints in the cement, al the side of the Kent Motor building, and won- uers who might have made them and how big and where the footprint-maker might be'. * • • Jack Suttek, librarian of the Dea Moines Register, sent us a couple of news mats, and enclosed a note to the effect that he 'liked pheasants pretty well ... if Jack only knew the kind of a pheasant hunter he was writing to ... like Jack, we only eat pheasant when somebody else shoots them. * * • The Algona Ore department ha* a splendid cooperative insurance plan ajnong the members, and we understand that when the five or six members of the department who have served splendidly for many years retire In the near future, the rest of the company intends to keep their insurance up for them, as a fine gesture of . friendship and appreciation. * • • La*t week folks made good use of our "Reader Comment" column. We welcome snappy letters to the paper, and they'll be printed no matter what the viewpoint, providing they don't contain anything libelous (untrue) . . . controversy is the foundation of freedom of speech and of the press, and some place in between the two opposing views is usually a safe and reliable meeting place of fair compromise with justice to all. * » * I.. J. Dickinson's assertion that AAA checks .swung votes against him brings up quite a bit of local controversy. Some point out that "Dick" campaigned as having voted for the AAA while Gillette didn't and that so far as Kossuth is concerned, the checks have not yet arrived and will not arrive until some time the latter part of Decem- ner, according to local officials of the AAA setup. ! 21 dog* that have lioen.wo in the city must be the ones who frequent State street. Postmaster Wade Sullivan could justifiably believe that his expectorating is mighty powerful . . . but here's the true story. IJuring the ri'Mn h'/ur, a. lady dropped a bottle of alcohol in the p O tabby; one of the boys could find nothing to sop it up it,ttj except the postmaster's gaboon. The p returned from lunch, lit his pipe, dropped r,u tti into said receptacle. A moment lattr i.t; and expectorated, and at that moment a t'/ llanie licKed toward the telling The firs dtpart rn.cn t was not necessary, but we uiulnn'jt.i.ri tfie have a new nickname for the I'. M Ton . fcy " ROOSEVELTS SAY ITS "A|LL RIGHT" WASHINGTON: "I think it is a healthful thing not to have the country represented too predominately by either party, for its puts both on their mettle. On the whole, I think it Is as easy to put through a well-thought-out program when the two major parties are more nearly equally represented in congress." Such were the post-election sentiments of cheery Mrs. Franklin Roosevelt But not for two days did her husband-President tell the press how he felt about the returns. In reply to direct questions he finally said the returns were "all right"; he did not anticipate a coalition of Republicans and conservative Democrats working against him; his own forecast of democratic losses had been too small by one senator ana 18 representatives; he did not plan to change his legislative program. Three courses seemed to lie before the president who, after having his hold on the country tightened In three successive elections, now suddenly felt that hold loosen: He could press ahead with his legislative reforms, forcing issues to bring about the national Liberal versus Conservative realignment he had undertaken. He could acquiesce in the new independence of congress and Iet4t work out Its own solutions to controversial problems like Labor Law, Social Security revision, and railroad rehabilitation, while he led on toward larger, less controversial goals such as national rearmament and security for the Western Hemisphere. He could seek by placatlon and compromise to restore harmony within his own party. THE76TH CONGRESS WASHINGTON: The arithmetic of the new 76th congress which the President faces is as follows: House Senate Democrats 328 Old New Old New Republicans .... Progressives ... Farmer-Labor. Independent 88 7 5 263 169 2 1 439 76 15 1 2 1 69 23 1 96 •Iudi;e W. B. Quartoji told Wi* tuaint (luuuiwr of Commerce that Iowa ha:i way u,c, w.aj.y law* . . said the Judge -"Why it's tvcn illegal u/ bunt on Sunday, and has been binte 1*11." * • * t'umous I^ist t+iiu- — A» two uuyiuttttA nr« overdue uu the note which you cndoi-Mbd, will you pli-uj»e stop in tuul »<•* tu u.t once. Subject to a half-dozen contests and recounts for House seats and one Senate seat (Indiana), this is the precise measure of national Republican resurgence. Not one of 193 incumbent Republicans failed to regain his seat. Of 25 former Republican Incumbents who tried to come back, 14 succeeded, whereas of the Houses' 38 "Young Turks' (150% New Dealers), 14 were gone. The Howe. Three things will make the job of the House Minority Leader easier: 1. There can be no more suspen- *'•(n of rules by the New Dealers, for that requires a two-thirds vote f-eot. All told thii Democrats now hpve only 45 votes more than a majority of the whole House. 2. Since 218 signatures (a major- itvi are required on petitions to discharge a committee and bring controversial bills out on the floor, that maneuver will be much harder for the New Dealers to execute next .session when bills unwanted by a conservative coalition are locked up in committee. 3. The personnel of the powerful Rules and Ways & Means committees is all messed up for the New Dealers. The Senate. In the old Senate, 2& Democrats had to revolt before the administration's control was broken. Now it would take only 22 Democrats, fewer than revolted more than once last session. Be- yon'J this arithmetic, election psycb- j fclbgy was seen reaching far into I w.-nator*' hearts. The purge failed. ' The people voted against a rubber; *Uinp congress. All but the most j sycophantic senators were seen : boldly voting their convictions. In ; the Senate even more than in the House, observers anticipated con- becoming the legislative : branc-h once more instead of an echo- I '// the executive. ; The New Deal's hope was that, j with their party's power threatened. i all Democrats would feel more like together. I l.«'i<ihlat!on. Whether or not ac- i tual coalitions of Republicans and : conservative Democrats are forsa- ed the 76th Congress looked by every outward sign certain to defeat Government Reorganization, Regional Planning, and any other major Roosevelt reforms. Conversely, no repeal of any New Deal measures appeared likely because the elections reflected no criticism of New Deal objectives and President Roosevelt still has veto powers. Sure to be agitated and perhaps passed are: Amendment of the Corrupt Practices Act (governing elections to Congress); Investigation of WPA and PWA for political pressuring; Revision'of NLRA, with new consideration for employers; Extension of Social Security, to head off the demands for old age pension lobbyists; Revision of crop control and subsidies. Likely to result from the new lineup in Congress: A tax bill less onerous than would have been expected (If a new one is now written). Railroad legislation more helpful to owners than the last Congress would have passed; Withdrawal of the president's discretionary powers over moneys voted, especially for Relief and Recovery; some gesture toward economy and budget-balancing. The new 76th congress convenes on January 3. RIOT AND RUIN INGEBMANV BERLIN, Germany: Nazi officials have often said privately that If a assassinate Fuhr"next day not a single member of the Jewish race would be left alive in the Reich.' When Herschel Grynszpan, a Polish Jew who had once lived in Germany last week strode into the German Embassy in Paris and with two bullets killed Third Secretary Ernst vom Rath, only a handful of Jews were reported killed. But all over Germany mobs smashed, looted and burned Jewish property to wreak final ruin on the hitherto systematically persecuted German-Jewish population. While police stood by, synagogues were everywhere fired or dynamited and numberless Jews of both sexes were beaten by mobs of young Germans who drove about in cars. Heavy boots of the sort worn by party members when in uniform gave a good clue to the identity of the window smashers and fire bugs. The synthetic "mobs" were In some cases joined by genuine mobs but these were mostly Germans who simply grabbed what they could after Jewish shop fronts had been smashed by the "mobs". Some mobsters tossed Jewish goods out of smashed windows to passersby with guffaws and cries of: "Here are some cheap Christmas prekents. Get yours early!" But not all German Aryans countenanced this depravity. Said an Aryan Berlni housewife despondently as she watched Aryan children making off with the contents of a Jewish shop: "So that is how they teach ovr children to steal!" The harsh, explosive epithets in which the German language is rich, were heaped, together with obscenities upon Jewish men, women and children in every part of the Reich. They were spat upon, cuffed, nose- jerked, kicked and given black eyes, lite atrocities stopped short of rape or firing squads. In Germany, insurance companies reported damage claims of more than $5,000,000 froth Jewish policy holders In Berlin, more than |4,000,000 In Vienna. The New York "Times" estimated that total dam age to Jewish property in Germany may possibly reach $400,000,000. After the three-day pogram, Economics Minister Goering signed decrees providing: that Jews Of German citizenship as a community pay to the state $400,000,000 indemnity for the assassination of Rath; that the state confiscate whatever is payable to Jew& by Insurance companies for damage done last week; that Jewish owners of damaged premises must repair them at their own expense; that after Jan. 1,1939, Jews be excludued front "operation of retail shops, mail-order houses and Independent exercise of handicrafts . . . Jewish shops operated in violation* of this order Will be closed by the police" (and presumably turned over to Aryans). Goering planned ultimately to move into ghettos all Jews who can or must tolerate life in Germany. And Jews were also forbidden to go to theatres, concert halts, art galler- es, public schools, high schools, and universities. By holding the Jewish community of Germany In a state of general Inability to earn a living wage, Naala obviously hope to force the international Jewish community to remit to Germany huge enough sums in "good money" to keep their Jewish relatives in the Reich from going too hungry or too cold. The dollars, pounds and franca thus secured by "shaking down the whole Jewish race" (as some Nazies term It) are wanted to pay for such vital im- Pefr* St John Kettfe fiaar ........ VVIlhlem M. Behnke Wllhelm M. Behnke Wilhelm M. Behnke . \Vllheim M. Behnke Lucia J. Wallace . J. Wallace Lucia J. Wallace Lucia 3. Wallace . 'Addle F. Gingrich et al . Hazel D. Forbes R. O. BJustront W 1-3 Ann Stwart et al 8 S rd*. Lewis Bike S ir of N 46' Kdw. A Boss E.44' of N 44' , N 44' J. Dickinson Botsford Lumber Co *S Anna Stewart et al 2 H. B. Rist 2-3 Hazel At Bums SH 4 Hazel M. Burns 5 Elule B. Rice 1 Elmer J. K«lly 7-8 Mervln C. Cronan S Mervln C. Cronan 6 Thos. B. Metcalf . .*l-2-6-«-7 Thos. B. Metcalf ,... »8 Mary Harsch NH S J. M. Moore . .8 82' ot lotsS-S Marie Helnsohn, et al < of lots 3-4 16 10 14 14 It 14 15 15 15 16 18 17 22 25 28 30 36 85 48 60 56 66 67 67 68 68 69 69 88 73 1»J7 19S7 1937 1837 1987 1M7 1*1 193 im ml 1937 1937 1737 1987 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937. 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 2.56 .90 1.81 1.81 1L74 1.99 .90 .99 .90 41.54 4.75 6.44 .S3 .20 .08 .08 .63 .09 .04 .04 .04 1.87 .11 .12 . 222.19 10.35 60.68 2.73 19.84 .87 .30 .80 .34 .30 .30 .80 .30 .80 .30 .89 .80 .30 .30 .80 88.38 2.17 9.87 85.02 153.50 6.14 .64 30.73 9.87 1.61 1.21 8.02 80.62 26.73 14.10 .30 .30 .60 .80 .30 .86 .10 til 6.91 .23 \80 .03 .30 1.38 .30 .44 .30 .07 '.SO .OS / .30 ..55 2.08 .68 .32 .60 ,60 .30 .30 8.8$ f.40 119 2.19 12.67 133 1.24 1.24 1.24 43.71 •6.16 6.66 282.84 6171 20.51 39.64 2.67 11.81 6S.2I 160.71 6.67 .97 82.41 10.41 1.93 1.66 9.17 33.80 26.61 14.72 ....10-1TH R , M ? R ™ riOK1 %' 7 Anna Button 9 1 1937 1937 26.09 .69 .30 26.98 Wm. Henry Salmon ..... E. A. Barton *N% lot 6 sub div. of 4 cy C. Llgef .......... 5 5 5 rene-Ellznbeth Lamuth 3-4 118 . E. O'Connor 1-2-3-4-7 8 216 tfl If red Johnson 2 217 Jert B. Baldwin 3 217 1937 1937 Nellfe O. Taylor '.*»A*.H*« *!•*. f AL. 6 217 Sverett Faith «8 217 •aul Fechner E 1*3 7 226 W 1-3 S 226 Amelia Nolle Ex lots 5-6 and TV 48' of 7 231 Vm. Kuhn Jr 232 Eva R. Towne SH ot 17-18 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 12.09 14.10 27.09 2.18 4.62 2.62 7.59 3.27 7.81 1.08 3.18 .54 .63 .61 .20 .20 .06 .34 .07 .16 .05 .30 .30 .30 .30 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .60 12.98 16.03 28.00 2.98 5.02 3.98 8.23 3.64 7,77 1.43 3.98 port's as Germany cannot get by barter deals. * • • MUNICH, Germany: Two Sundays ago, 'Germany's No. 1 anti- Nazi Cardinal von Faulhaber preached In his cathedral at Munich on "The God-Given Rights of Personality" to the accompaniment of rude whistles (which he ignored) from Nazies in his congregation. At the height of Germany's pogroms last week, Cardnial Faulhaber asked for police protection for the Catholic clergy. A Nazi mob promptly ganged up to the Cardnial's palace, smashed all the windows within stone's throw. * • * WASHINGTON: Aroused by Germany's Jew-baiting, the State Department last week ordered Ambassador Hugh R. Wilson home from Berlin to "report and consult" with :he President. COMICS BANNED IN ITALY ROME. Italy: Banned by the It-, alian Ministry of Popular Culture Jacob Harlg a Fredollne Steuasy 4-5 Hulda A Edw. Oenrloh .. 6 Hulda A Edw. Qenrlch .. 7 P. A. Danson ....'. g Prank Becker Mabel Lund 4.5 H. E. Rl»t A Guy Mantor 9 all of 27-28 277 1997 CALL A SMART'S ADD. 1937 '80.68 2.73 .30 63.71 1937 23.17 1.04 1937 66.70 2.65 23.17 .84 .80 23.JJ .30 .30 24.51 69.5S 2 R 5 TH '* D 1937 1987 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 Mae Jones .. ____ «l-2 3-4-6 Mary J. Ward ...... .... 6 CALL'S SOUTH ADD; M. Finn Raymond Neuroth"!!'. '.'.'. 4 2 Russell & Zelba Maxwell 6-6 2 Mary Jennings 13 2 Raymond Neuroth ....20-21 2 PARK 1987 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 Rose Householder RESERVATION NO. 2 N 1 rd. and WMi of 6 1 Laura Holtcamp ?$ft' S AVB ' P. A. Danson et al Ntt ex W. 4 rd N 347.51' 1 242 Sarah ana Ella Walker 3-4*5 PaulC. Qef, Xen TelV rd8 .° f .I: 86245 H. C. Johannsen N «6' of f Ctt* T -.» n *Y*-*.. _!_-* J937 D. 1937 1937 1937 1937 AUDITOR'S PLAT . E 66' Lot 3 SEW H. E. Hint & Guy Mantor Mot 4 aud plat NEH 8EH Julius Peterson. Lot 13 Aud. Plat NEW SE% Frank Stebrltz Lot 18 Aud. flat NE« 8E% oy BJustrom N 4 rd. of 8 rd. of Lot 3 Aud. 95 95 95 29 29 29 29 1937 1937 1937 1937 12.62 14.46 4.03 21.60 22.58 1.0$ 9.91 4.60 45.68 30.23 28.20 24.18 2.02 12.09 .70 24.92 16.12 .68 17.73 72.24 36.27 61.25 11.59 14.10 .31 ,65.18 .97 1.02 .06 .46 .20 4.12 1.36 1.27 1.09 .09 .64 .03 ,30 .30 .30 .39 .30 .30 .30 .30 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 1.12 .72 .03 .4« 3.25 1.63 5.54 .26 .63 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .80 .30 .30 14.23 15.40 .4.61 22.87 23.9* 1.43 10.66 5.00 50.30 3189 29.77 25.57 2.41 12.93 1.03 26.84 1T.14 1.01 18.4.1 76.79 38.20 67.30 12.15 15.03 2 95 29 1937 40,30 LSI .30 42.41 be* ............. V-, - 7;. s ' 8 ' sbee R SO' s 9 n> « V4 lot 7 SE«4 8E14 uth Black "Lot 2 Autf. Nellie O. Taylor Lota 1516 17 Oov. Lot 6 NEW 11 n nuine jaai weeK were Hie comic "en *-. tjorenson *WH strips "Popeye the Sailor" and i l£l, 5 AIudflpla ' SE « N EW 'Mickey Mouse" (Italian name: !"Fowin» le c2m lll & 8 £ °1 Topolino") because they do not find 2 rd w of NE cor w 95 95 95 95 ts they contribute to "exaltation of the imperial. Fascist and Mussolinian tone in which we live." Italian editors, spurred by new Fascist drive for "racism", have also been Inking over the hair of blond U. S. heroes like Flash Gordon anu Joe Palooka. CHILDREN IN U. S. AND ENGLAND CHJCAGOa Many a parent and educator suspects that children'* radio programs over-excite their youthful audiences. Parent John James DeBoer, whose one child is too young 1 to listen to radio, investigated the suspicion. He questioned 738 grammar-school children, had 486 radio-listening moppets watched, used a "photopolygraph" (modified He detector) on 148 to measure respiration, blood pressure, pulse, electrical resistance of the skin. He wrote his University of Chicago thesis on "The Emotional Responses of Children to Radio Drama". Last week the university revealed some of his findings: children often do have violent physiological • reactions to radio programs; violent action is not the only cause of excitement—small children got a major thrill out of hearing a dog bark in his bath; biggest thrill of all in one program was the offer of a premium. LONDON: Odeon Theatres In London last week released the results of a survey of audience reactions at children's matinees in 142 theatres with a total weekly attendance of 150,000. Of British children. 83 per cent like newsreels, 94 like military and naval scenes, 89 like shots of royalty, 88 dislike foreign dictators. British children's favorite stars In order of their popularity are Hollywood's Buck Jones, Shirley Temple, Jane Withers and Tim McCoy. _ - _ .. of NE cor .. 10 rd S 8 rd E 10 rd N to beg Emory Crouch Lot 5 niid. I'lat NW^4 NWij N 82U' lot 6 aud plat mVKNWK 12 95 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 75.86 20.15 12.76 81.27 42.35 3.41 .91 1.15 3.66 2.63 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 1937 17.61 .79 .30 Llyod Stelnman Florence Rtelnman .. 6 C H. LaBarre *g Lloyd Stelnmar. 12 Wm. Busch '15 Lloyd Stelnman ..8&E2rd 7 A. T. STACY'S ADD. 2 1937 2 1937 2 1937 2 1SS7 2 1937 3 1937 1937 12.10 .64 W. A. Whit. 7-8° AK PARK ADD , E. J. Van Nenm ..45-46-47-48 I, Katliryn Laahbrook E4-55-66 Edna K. Vergu C. B. Murtaffh 1937 1937 Hulda Schmidt *.,-»., ITulda Bchmlitt 15-18 rrankllr: Sf. Etherlngtop W 18 Imogens Sand Vi of 7-8-9-10-11 Arnold & 1»37 1937 CREST ADD. 1937 1937 1937 Alma Johnson Alma Johnson ......... A. Hyde ......... . •! H.e*arty EiU .3-4-5-6 David David Eat. But. J'erry C. Thompson \V2~3 2 no L^.T: £• I?"'!"! 1 " 0 " •• 3-4 m 3 1917 ALOONA DISTRICT NO 2 CALL'S ADD. 10 1837 M 71..3-4 72 72 1.80 1.53 4.17 1.44 5.07 1.80 .90 3.43 20.30 3.26 3.97 6.45 1.13 2.26 17.15 Nellie O. Taylor '.'. 4 .Vellle O. Taylor 5 Chester Chester Bertor BertoM John'-' Eva Chapman ....'!..''• 7 Kva Chapman ......... »g American Yoetnan «N30' i J. & Joseph H. Hatten N 80' of H 120' 1 N 43 1-3' of E 10' 8 83 1-3' 2 B 40' of E 10' 8 83 1-3' 4 Prances C. Hart ........ 14 Mary Heger .............. 15 Wm. Carolar. .......... 14 Catherine Carolan ...... 15 181 181 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 4.62 14.75 1.42 12.X9 10.98 2.63 .53 8.92 .S3 .35 '•. PLAT .04 .03 .29 .03 .30 .04 .02 .16 .91 .07 .09 .15 .03 .05 .39 .22 .66 .13 1.74 .49 .13 .02 .40 .02 01 .30 .30 .30 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .60 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 .SO .30 79.67 21.30 14.21 85.23 46.28 18.70 12.94 2.11 1.84 5.fl« 1.77 6.67 2.14 1.22 3.88 21.61 3.63 4.36 6.90 1.49 2.61 17.84 5.44 15.71 2.15 15.23 1J.77 J.05 .85 9.62 .85 1937 37.7« 1.70 .30 39.7« 1937 1937 1937 1937 1936 1937 1937 1937 1937 Ottosen Cagers Win A Double Header Ottosen: Ottoaen girls' and boys' basketball teams opened their season by winning a double header from Des Moines township Friday evening here. The scores were girls 81 to 13 and the boys 16 to 11. DELINQUENT TAX LIST The rullowinK U u I rut. und correct Hut of all land kcjSBUlli Counly, luwu, on which the tuxca for the .year and town lulu la r 1937 and pruvluua all the /ear « . tl'e ascription u " 8uM ' """ fact '" cuats whore there ore existing: delinquent taxes otter than for huwn. name having been previously offered for nule. but rera»In- " ™ . by ai: a»terl»k (• M. J. DUFFY. fmvt ul lire, or Town, Add or »ce. Tup Acre* Year kuli-Ulv. or or UUK «ud Suld I-. A. Grvuwa.ll I.. A. (ironwall U alter V. Dudclu ti ul . Waller K Dodtlu et ul N'tltlu Haas 1 2 3 4 5 6 •2 •3 • 4 Perry St. John *6 Nfltle Mauls Nettle Huatf NYltlu 1'i-rry Haul; .luliu Fury St. Julio IVrry St. John Lot Ulk. 3 7 4 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 1001U* Kor 1M7 m? 1937 Tux fill. font* 'futml 18.88 .85 .30 20.11 Clara V. Keller 3 Clara V. Keller 4 Nlcholai Hcholtea 15 N'ichola* Hcholtes ig Kenneth Dlmworth "... l Theo. A. Dlxon 2 Then. A. Dlxon s Tl-eo. A. Dlxon 4 Tho. A. Dlxon 5 Theo. A. Dlxon 6 Theo. A. Dlxon 7 Theo. A. Dlxon g Mrn. Hattle LIchllK-r .. Mrx. Ha (tie IJchllter Mr*. Hattle IJchllter T. A. Dlxuii T. A. Dixon T. A. Dlxon KVnneth Dltxworth .. Kcrni-th DltHWorth .. Kenneth Itjixworth ... Kenneth DHxworth ... Kenneth Mtaworlh .. Mut. Trim Lifts Ins. . W. T. LOT CO.'S 1ST ADD. 3.78 11.65 11.65 7.53 17.11 31.20 7.99 17.76 33.04 .17 1.16 1.16 .68 .30 .80 .60 .60 Fl ora Oillea Oillea M. Flora M. Flora M. Gllles ...'..'... 5 Flora M. ail lea .......... 6 Flora M. Qllle» ........ 7 Flora M. Ollleg ........ g Flora M. Oille» ........ 9 Flora M. QllleB ........ 10 14 14 J.6 15 16 16 16 16 Ifi 16 16 16 16 16 in 16 16 16 16 16 16 Hi 16 17 22 'it 22 22 22 22 22 22 26 26 27 27 28 28 28 28 CALL'S ADD. 6 1 1937 1937 1837 1837 1837 1»37 1837 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1S37 1837 1837 18S7 19.17 1937 1K37 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 1937 l'J37 i»;j7 1937 11*37 1937 1937 1937 13.55 6.61 6.'g7 .67 .57 .57 .57 1.46 1.83 1.83 24.06 .61 .10 .30 .01 .12 .01 .01 .01. ,01 .13 .16 .16 2.18 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 30 .30 .60 .60 .60 • 60 2.till 7.21 .8~, 6.79 .88 ,b« .88 .88 2.19 2.59 2.58 2S.84 Lucy A. Dlxon 11 T A. Dlxon 12 T. A. Dlxon 13 T. A. Dlxon 14 K. Andernon 19 K. Anderson 20 V.'ra. Carolan 11 VVm. Carolan M2 Hanna Hratlurd 2 Hanna Hratlund 3. Lena Scliluttner ., 1 Lena Bchluttnvr 2 Sctilultner 3 Lenu Scf luUntr 4 Albert Cutler McCoweln 'beg 8 rd w of KW cor lot 14 Blk 1 Cull'n Add N 40 rd W 8 rd S 40 rd H $ rd ot beg 1 1937 A. W. Kenredy 11 2 1937 Carl Quo. Johnnon 12 2 1937 C'url Oeo. Johnaon 13 2 1937 furl Qeo. Jolinnon 14 2 1937 Curl Oeo. Johnnor ljf« 26 87-83 rd B of SW cor of NYVK BKc. 24-98-29 N 20 id E 8 rd 8 20 rd W to bug 1937 .., ' , CALL'S SOUTH ADD Wm. Carolan 6-6 1 1938 VVm. Carolan S 1 1837 Wm. Curolan g j 1937 Arobroao V>' Kennedy S 50 1 2 1937 Andrew W. Kromlnfta .... 8 5 1837 ., . . _ , SEARLB'S ADD. Frank A. Keeker J _ 2 1937 2.t7 23.60 16.52 1.13 1.51 1.61 1.S1 1.51 1.51 1.B1 1.61 1.51 .78 .79 8.88 1.51 1.51 1.51 18.88 1.51 1.51 l.r.l 1.52 11.10 .22 .22 .22 .22 .23 .22 .23 2.22 7.55 1.61 1.51 1.51 1.52 28.32 37.76 8.01 26.43 2.01 .71 13.32 .71 .71 1.92 1.50 .18 .80 1.49 .10 1.08 .37 .01 .07 .07 .07 .07 .07 .07 .07 .07 .04 .04 .40 .07 .07 .07 .85 .07 .07 .07 .07 .25 .01 .01 .01 .01 ,01 .01 .01 .04 .34 .07 .07 .07 .07 1.27 1.70 .27 1.18 .10 .03 .80 .03 .03 .8ft .30 .30 .30 _.30 .30 .30 .39 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 ..HI .30 .30 .30 .:to .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .HO .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .80 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .20 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 .30 5.86 .13 .30 46.64 3.7S 1.77 9.54 1.78 4.16 .17 .08 .45 .08 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 115 .OS .30 75.02 10.13 42.48 ,.91 .94 18.88 .21 .04 .85 .60 .30 .30 .30 .30 4.2S 13.41 13.41 8.81 19.63 35.1* 8.47 18.86 34.8j 2.47 2?.9« 17.19 1.46 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.12 1.13 9.5S 1.88 1.83 l.SK 20.03 1.88 1.88 1.84 1.89 11.65 .63 .S3 .53 .51 .54 .53 .54 2.56 8.19 1.88 1.88 1.88 1.89 29.89 39.7S 3.58 27.92 2.41 1.04 14.22 1.04 6.29 60.40 4.25 2.15 10.29 2.16 1.60 85.75 44.69 6.23 1.2$ 20.03 (Continued on Inside of back page) 10.66 .24 .30 11.19 BOWL FOR BETTER HEALTH BARRY'S

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