The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 1, 1953 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, September 1, 1953
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PAGE TWO BLYTHEVIU.E (ARK.) COURIER NEWS TUESDAY, SEPT. 1, 1958 AlabamaSenatorHillDefends Loyalty Pledge Requirement By JACK BUM, WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Hill (D-Ala) said today it's too early for the Democrats even to talk about a 1956 presidential nominee but that party members who participated in 'selection of a national ticket should pledge their loyalty to it. Without naming them, the Alabama senator criticized Southern colleagues who have aid they will not be bound in advance to support the nominee of the parly's next conven- said they lion. Hill said if this question is going Carolina and to be brought before the Demo-1 their refusal to be bound by the cratio rally in Chicago Sept. 14-15. as suggested by Oov. Hugh White -,! Mississippi, he intends Ui be tin hand to speak his mind on the issue. Louisiana despite national headquarters spokesmen said they believe that, if the issue Is raised at Chicago, It will be shelved. subcommittee is scheduled to pledge. Battle plans to attend the Chicago get-together this month. Several key Southerners have said they will not po. Among them is Sen. Holland iD-Flm. whose decision "I think those who take part in j wn , termed regrettable by Rep. ic party's councils and who re- celler (D-NY). Sees Virlory In '54 th ceive all of the benefits and honors of the party should be loyal to It and to its nominess," he declared in an interview. On the other hand. Gov. John 6. Battle of Virginia, said he will pass up the 1956 convention unless he has "reasonable assurances" that the party's pledge of loyalty to the national ticket will be dropped. "I would think the party leaders realize now they made a terrible mistake In setting up the pledge." Battle said yesterday. He played a major role in the successful flight last year to seat convention "The Democratic party, with good leadership and poltcal acumen, can easily capture the House and the Senate in 1054." Celler said in n statement. "There should be no souther defections on the eve of victory." Holland had said he has seen no evidence that the Democratic party leadership has .changed the views which cost it four Southern states last year. As for the loyalty pledge, Gov. White has suggested that the Chi- i cago meeting could go on record report on the adoption of formal rules for the national committee, but this group has no control over the national nominating convention beyond setting up the original role of delegates. The national conventions adopt their own rules. The Chicago meeting will be aiming Its spotlight primarily at former Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois, the 10o2 Democratic presidential nominee. Some party members have regarded this as an effort to keep Stevenson in the forefront for the 1956 nomination. However. Hill, who campaigned actively for Stevenson last year, said he think? It Is ton early to begin talking about any presidential candidates. MAKES THE FUR FLY—Probably the world's only cat to fly faster than sound is Zero, six-toed alley cat mascot of the 62nd Fighter-Interceptor Squadron at O'Hare International Airport, Chicago. She made her supersonic flight in an F86-D Sabrejet,. piloted by Ma). Richard Garrett, squadron commander. Freed POW Tells of Forced Propaganda Radio Broadcast By GKORGE MCARTHUR I of 1350 while serving as an adviser FREEDOM VILLAGE, Korea L41 ! with ft Soulh Korean unit. He snid delegations from Virginia, South I as favoring its abandonment. But Read Courier News Classified Ads. ANTMCING EQUIPMENT ENABLES F 89 TO FLY IN ANY TYPE WEATHER, AND PROVIDES ENOUGH HEAT TO WARM A 150- 'IIOOM OFFICE BUILDING HIGH EXPLOSIVE 2.75-INCH .. KOCKETS MOUNTED IN THE" WINGTIf PODS COVE* A ! CONCENTRATED FIELD OF n •FIRE EQUAL IN AREA TO All STANDARD FOOTtALL FIELD •? ' ( " FIEKf AFTEMURNERS BOOST THE SCORPION'S ENGINE POWER TO EQUAL THAT OF 150 AVEHAGE-SIZED ?£ AUTOMOBILES, --— ' TWO JET ENGINES. CAPABLE OF PUSHING THE F-89 TO ALTITUDES OF 45,000 FEET. IURN AS MUCH AIR IN AN HOUR , AS IS CONTAINED IN i' 500 FIVE.ROOM HOUSES THE ALL-WEATHER INTERCEPTOR HAS 10 MILES OF WIRE. RADAR AND OTHER ELECTRONIC DEVICES USE ENOUGH -2"^-'ifc-' ELECTRICAL TUBES T --.I J AND BULBS TO I !--<=SUPPLY 80 HOUSE RADIOS. SCORPION'S A NEW JET BUZZER—This is an artist's conception of the new Northrop Scorpion F-86D jet interceptor now in production in Hawthorne, Calif. The plane's unique features are highlighted by comparison with some everyday illustrations. Some 163,000 parts go into the manufacture of the plane, which is capable of downing the largest bomber with one blast of its high explosive air-to-air wingtip rockets. Spectacular performance! Stand-out gas saving! Far greater safety! OnlyStudehkrojffersyou so much for so little money Gel this long, luxurious Sludebaltcr at a sensational loiv price! Y OU'RE sure to be out ahead two ways If you buy an excitingly styled new Studebaker. First of all—you get the most talked about car In America for one of the lowest delivered prices In America. Second—the new Studebuker Is so strikingly original In design, it will be outstanding long after most other 1953 cars are outmoded. Come in and go for a ride. Trade In your present car. Drive home your own new Studebaker. This C/Kimnt'mi Custom Sudan °° 1823 DELIVERED IN BLYTHEVILLE vt'ifh sfamfarrf equfpmenf State tirtil local taxes, if any. vxtra Compatibly low piion* «r* in •lf*ct on »U otW 1933 StudihafcAn including th» brilliAntly powtrftd Comm*nd*r V-8. «nd th» ultr4 roomy Und CniU*i. Tht naw Studaaakar !• • fat mlltett ilarl Thil year Main in the Mobilgai Run, the Champion, theCommanderand Land Cruiser V-8l, made icnaatlonal scorti. (tiitflaakar (•!• Its] F.ihl.n Acadtmy Award! Sludehnlter Ityle hfli been named outstanding by Fashion Academy, noted New York ichool of fashion design. Pewir itttrlrtf, Aut*m«tl< Prlvt or Ovtrdriv*, •vallobla tA «(( modtli *t «Ktr« tail. CHAMBLIN SALES COMPANY Railroad & Ash Stretts W. D. "Bill" Chamblin, Owner —An American lieutenant colonel said today he and a group of fellow prisoners facing starvation were forced by the Reds to make a propaganda broadcast over Pyongyang radio. The men "felt very bad" about the broadcast, said Lt. Col. Paul V. Liles of Columbis, Ga., but they th.it in [he months that food was so scarce "several hundred prisoners starved to death." He said he approached camp authorities and asked to be allowed to appeal for food packages. Instead, the Reds collected 20 men Building Permits and Real Estate Transfers n d took them to the North Korean .capital. Pyongyang, promising they wnre so weak "they couldn't even j would be allowed to appeal on the march around the yard." And the | radio for Air Force food drops. Rods thrcfltened any who refused lo broadcast with a 100-mile march back to prison camp at Pyoktong. "That was tantamount to a.death sentence." said Lilies in an interview following his liberation at Panmunjom today. Liles was captured in the fall Liberated Airman Says Russian Questioned Him FREEDOM VILLAGE, Korea OP)— An American airman liberated today said he was questioned by a Russian who showed him plans for neu- U. S. warplanes and maps of American air bases. Capt. Harry F. Hedlund of Ful- lerlon, Calif., said that after his H26 bomber was shot down in March 1951 his captors "took me into a house where there was a Russian in civilian clothes. He pulled a gun and laid it on a table." A Korean doctor who examined the POWs in Pyongyang found all were suffering from "extreme malnutrition" and insisted that they get eggs and meat, Liles said. Korean guards sent to look for meat came back with one dog. "It was delicious," .Liles said. Of the broadcast, he related: All of the men were allowed to write speeches, but the North Koreans edited them to insert anti- American propaganda. "I objected but the North Kor"an major said anyone who failed to make a speech would be i.iarcned back to Pyolitong on loot." Cigarette Users Set New Record WASHINGTON users sent up record clouds of smoke T15N-R9E. j in the 12 months ended June 30. , Nearly 397 billion cigarettes were ; consumed, an increase of 34 per j cent from the previous year, the i Agriculture Department estimated Hedlunf said the Russian "fhow-, today. The percentage of increase, i-d me drawings of latest TJ .S. nir-j however, was slightly less than in craft. Some of them I didn't rec- j t f, e t, wo preceding years. Ciear smofrrs had a busy too. They consumed about six mil Only one Building permit was received by the City Office last week. The permit was granted to Hattie Pant for the construction of a two room and bath, frame residence on Myrtle Street valued at ISWO. .Real estate transfers registered in the Circuit Clerk's office last week were: Margaret S. Fox to E. A. Stacey for $26,000, on quarter interest in 493.39 acres. NE. quarter, 8E quarter Secll, S half. NW quarter. Sec. !2. N half, NE quarter, Sec. 13, NE quarter, Sec. 13-T14N-R8E. Alton and Glenn Thomas to Glenn R. and Jerome Thomas, for »1 love and affection, Whalf, Lot 9, Lot 10, Block C, Hollandale Addition. Clifton and Evaline Ware to Ed Ware, for $12,200, Lot, U, Blocfc 3, Tollipeter Shonyo Addition. William and Maudine Vermillion to William and Julia Jaliff, for $1,000. Lot 11, Sec. 31-T15-R9, City of Manila. Wiliam and Julia Jaliff to Alva and Arietta Jaliff, for $1 and assumption of indebtedness. Lot 11. Sec, 31-T-15R9. Cily of Manila. Cecil Connell to Helen King, for $10 and other consideration, Lots 1, 2, 3. 4, Block 1, Wilson's First Addition. Helen King to Cecil and Sue Connell. for $10 and other considerations, Lots 1. 2. 3. 4, Block 1, Wilson's First Addition. J. J. Cookston to Clemenzia T. Cookston. for $10 and other considerations, Lot 3. Block 7, Highland Place Second Addition. Lucille Paires, Mary H. Stlck- mon. and Elizabeth Smart, to John F. and Lucille Arends, for $7.500, Lot 3, Block 2, Sudbury Addition. Bertha Loveless to J. W. and Lena Booker, for $10 and other considerations. oLt 9, Subdivision of Lot 16. Barren and Lilly Subdivision of Acre Lots in SCW quarter. Sec. 15, -T15N-R11E. S. J. and Luba Cohen, to Mary R. Dixon. tor SI. Lot 35, re-plat ol J. P. Pride and Gateway Subdivision. Mary R. Dixon to S. J. and Luba Cohen, for SI. Lot 35. re-plat ol J. P. Pride and Gateway Subdivision. David A. James to S. E. and Dorth E. Southern, for $400, a ppr- cel of land 210 by 243 feet in NE — Cigarette j q uar ter oi NW quarter, Sec. 31- ognize. 1 couldn't, answer about them." "Some nf the drawings looked good to me." the flier nclcled. "AmmiR them were drawings of E31s and B47s." Royal Family Loses Land) CAIRO ifl — Egypt's land re-j form, under which ownership of i agricultural land is limited to 300 j acres per family, has cost a mem-' ber of the Iraqi royal family the .loss of 83 acres. Queen Nefissa, 5 Tfar i grandmother of King Faisal II of i Iraq, owned 383 acres In southern i lion stogies, aiso a gain of 34 per; Egypt, ; cent from the previous year. But! She was asked to give up 83; cignr smokers have had two bigger; acres which are to be distributed years, the department said. j to landless peasants. Phont 6888 Here's Value! BRAND-NEW SINGER CABINET SEWING MACHINE __ [)g Complete course in home i Ml X' Yours ...at no extra tost.. • with l" Ktl f* of new mnthinel T»» . et „ <omplet« «>"£ in horn, sewing »n<W expert pel tors at your •-•— SEWING CEHTB. ALL FOR ONLY COMPLETE LIBERAL TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE EASY TERMS fO» tOU» riOTICTION. SIHCH «Hs onJ scrvioi it! Stwing Maihines, Vacuum floon. in, and oilier product! only through SIHCII SIWIM CfWilS. yenlified by lh« Hod "S" liod- Mark ond tbi "MNCII SEWIHC (Mir emblem on thi window, ami never through olhir sloiei or oullitt. •I liril IIP! t( l«t UKII BIMIMCmiM CfvflH Sturdy attractive console table Gleaming walnut finish (Matching stocl at slight additional cost) Spotlight A-C or D-C Batl<eiJ ty 10 ° y« ars "' SINGER dependability ALWAYS AVAILABLE SERVICE No matter when you mo»«, rtliobleSIMGil|»rl)ond»rv- ki an olwnyi at mar K your telephone. (S» SIHGEI SWINC KMHINt (OMMNT In doisifiid directory.) ALSO USED TREADLE MACHINES $17.50 up SINGER SEWING CENTER 414 W. Main —Blytheville— Phone 2782 Soviet Envoy To Iran Said To Be III TEHRAN, Irsn yp) — Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Lavrentlev was reported ill today with—according to Russian sources—-"heart trouble." An Irianian Foreign Ministry source quoted a.Russian official aa saying that La-vrentlev hud been confined to his bed for several days following a heart attack caused by the high altitude of Tehran. Earlier, the Iranian capital had been swept by rumors, ail unconfirmed, that Lavrentlev had attempted suicide after receiving a telegram recalling him to Moscow. Communist prestige suffered a bad reverse as a result of the overthrow Aug- 19 of Red-supported Premier Mohammed Mossadegh and the triumphant return of the Shah. Delayed Payment WARREN, Ohio (/P) — While Mrs. John Nagy worked In her yard, t stranger approached and said, "I have coma to pay for the chickens I stole." He handed her $3. It seems that 18 years earlier, when the Nagys lived on a farm, the boy had taken a few chickens. Mrs. Nagy tried to return the $3 but the stranger refused. So she said she would "go to church and put every bit of It In the collection envelope." Insult and Burglary OMAHA Wl — Burglars who broke into a business establishment here added insult to injury by (D! using the firm's truck to haul away; the toot, and (2) stealing the company's burglary insurance policy. ! TRADI IT IN ON A N1W REMINGTON QuMA&t WITH AMAZING M1RACU TAB DON EDWARDS CO. RENTALS-SALES-SERVICE 112 W. Walnut Phone 33S2 UP TO $ 1OO Trade in on your old Refrigerator (if it's running) on the Great New Refrigerators by INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER «• fof frown foodi and le» cr-o* ... 13* for frown <J*»«rti end quick chilling ... 31° for k«p1na <'•'>• m"""' frs)h • • • 370 fof mi |lc and gen.rol food ifofafl* • • • *°° humi(J told for freih fnilh ond y. B «t a bl 39° for *gflt, tondimoMi, bol- tlad b8Y.roa« ... 55" for k« e pln 8 butlar «<»y la «p«od. fT«mp«(oWr« *hown or. for tft«roo« condition*) It takes 7 different areas of cokl-from 6* to 55'-to keep basic foods in prime condition. You get all 7 of these essential "food climates"—all working at once —in the new 1H Refrigerators. Come in and sec how they can help you feed your fam- ,ily better-get more out of your grocery money, too. Htw Push-button automatic defro»tlni Beautiful Spring-Fresh Green intartort &!g Full-width froeznr* Pantry-Dor with «xtrd sholvei Giant Criiptfi, deep and roomy • Famout "Tlghl-Wad"* unit with 5-year warranty LOW DOWN PAYMENT IASY TERMS! 10 models from $229.95 Offer Good to Sept. 15 312 South 2nd Blytheville For Fine Foods, Choose PICKARD'S GROCERY & MARKET Nationally Adv«rtii«d & Fancy Groceries We Deliver Call In 2043 Come In 1044 Chick. (\

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