The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 24, 1937 · Page 3
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 3

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, June 24, 1937
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•I The Algona Upper Pea Moines, Algona, Iowa, June 24,1937 Bnttred M Second cftUa Matter at tli* **a*to»tt« at Ai(Mi«, Iowa, under act of Congress of March 8,1*T» lamed Weekly ftfttHbef t«*» PrMa ttAT&S IN ROeSttH CO.: OB« fern*, in Advance _ Upper Dea Hoinea and Kossnth Ounty Ad- j*«"» tn combination, per jreat SCBSCBDPTION BATHS OUTSIDE KO88QTR ich Miles objects, a non-Legion man will appointed, but it Happens that Hubert Utter- bfct* Mtf, In Ui» past, opposed some of the legislation th'e Left6n has endeavored to pass. Hence the oftrt&tion of Mr. Miles. Mr. Miles, as we said before, la entitled to his opinion of th'e matter, just M we are. His sole rea- «bri for objecting to what Kraschel did—and tien- sotf said—la based on his own particular Interpretation of wnat constitutes being "a good, loyal, Am- ertcah dtteeft." And perhaps if we were getting paid, as is Mr. Miles, tor stirring the editorial broth at all times along a certain line, we might say and act as he does. Until that time, we shall try to conduct our editorial comment oh a little higher level, ahd our pYtvate correspondence in a gentlemanly manner. (Mr. Miles' complete letter is reprinted elsewhere oh this page). Momes ahd Kossuth County "Advance in combination, per year ..... $4.06 : AttVKK'tlMlXO BAWS&' -t.-^ rtWn** I*** 1 IncH 356 Adi, payable in advance, word ..._ .Se "Let th« people know dt« troth and the oMn» Iry I* sate."—Abraham UitcelM. Red Dewel reading a Sunday supplement story about ho* the 700 wives of an ancient hareiri w*re tortured by tHeir lord and master . . . Bob James greeting a group of youngsters, dressed in these one-piece suit of shorts, with "Hello 6oys and Girls" and then In a few seconds correcting h'is error with "Pardon Me. Girls". . . tale of a local lawyer who recounts that he sat in his office after first coming to town for two weeks, until one day Tom Shermah walked in for a visit, and was his first visitor in two weeks; and the lawyer says now He repays the courtesy and' visits Tom once in a while . . . John Wheelock about to drive to- Watertown, S. D., and wondering if the dust will be the same on the morrow when he drives aa It was the day before . . . it's a funny thing, but sometimes the boys with the real authority and say-so are a darn sight less officious and egotistic than the less important ihdlv- uals in an orghaization . . . what Algona minister has been out of town in the interests of another pulpit?. . . Frank and Van hustling two over-imbibers into the squad car adn off to jail . . . they tell us, however, that the beer business is far Below normal so far this year . . . Andy Foster, and daughter, Mary, off to the golfing wars . . . another false alarm about a Monkey-Ward store coming into town. • * • And once again, pin ball machines come under fire . . . ho, hum . . . like taxes, they are ever with us ... and like taxes, they'll probably never be entirely disposed of. On thing nobody has thought of yet as a means of easing the female unemployment situation, la starting the position of stewardess on a submarine . . . just imagine a pretty little stewardess serving; tea and wafers between torpedoes . .. what a relief for the tired sailors ... it should also lead to the altar, sooner or later, probably sooner. Do you suppose any of them Spaniards know what they are fighting for? The Germans, Italians) and Russians may have some idea, but not the Spaniards, in whose back yard all the damage is being done. YOU SAID IT, KID! "Of all the wonders of the world, there is nothing to surpass the brain of man," quoted from speech of an English professor. * • • Our off-hand guess would be that this Is a poor Week to demand the utmost of legal minds In this dsatstrad: bat UMM legitimate cases may reap * re- vicinity ... or didn't everybody go to the Chau-' - •" »"!* "^^"~ f^atftoitoe tlirttnttnt tdtotfi*? r -T-* — TOWA»I> RELIEF is CHANGING It is becoming very evident that the attitude toward relief is changing— rapidly. In the first place, raahy people who several years ago would Have done almost anything to keep from going' oh relief, are now beginning to accept it aa a divine right And in the second place, mahy of the remain- in^' public who a' few years ago had their sympathies arousad in behalf of those who needed relief, are now finding that what they thought would be temporary charity is likely to become a hideous nightmare for years to come: To cite a' fertr concrete examples: Otar local reemploymeht office handles registrations for all who are out of Jobs, and want to •vtorlt. And yet (through no fault of the reemploy- meht office) farmers who want field hands are in moat cased unable to get them, or if they do, the men stick only a day or two, then quit. Relief is easier than working. •' One man registered for work, was given a job doing ferret work' for an employer seeking cisterns to clean. He found that the man he had hired had gone home; the job was off, when he had believed him canvassing for cistern-cleaning jobs. Relief waa easier. Our own county board of supervisors, a few years ago, felt that printing the names of those in the county bills who were receiving county aid would act as a check on those seeking such aid. A year or two ago, however, the supervisors decided to drop the names of those receiving relief. THEY FOUNO THAT PRINTING THE NAME OF THOSE GETTING COUNTY AID RESULTED IN MORE APPLICATIONS PROM OTHER FOLKS WHO PELT THEY AS JUSTLY DESERVED SUCH HELP. To summarize the situation, tl looks very much aa though those obtaining relief, or hoping to obtain it, are abusing the privilege in many instances. The rest of the public, on the other hand, slow to gather momentum, but hard to stop when it does, may resolve Itself into a force that will angrily demand curtailment of funds to those who show no desire to work, and who have found it to easier to sit and receive, than to work and give. There are many cases where relief is just and Reader Comment Des Moines, June 11. 1937. Algona Upper Des Moines Sirs: Enclosed is a clipping from the Iowa Legionaire (Jun« 4». official publication of the Iowa Department and in ninety-eight other counties they certainly do. On May 21, we praised your special issue of eight pages on the Eighth District Legion conference in Algona and we gave your name. We didn't say "an Algona publication." For your information I have repeatedly said that the country should have stronger and more in- The MARCH OF TIME »' •H.o.s.rn.otv. Prepared by the Edltora of TIME The Weekly Newtmafmine ward tite da M tfMerv* wh rlies U a f»rer pitch because of the abuse of charity by another group. KICKS ON U. & ADVERTISING SAVINGS BONDS In a recent mail. W. F. Miller, editor of i»e Livermore Gazette, calls attention to a full page advertisement of the United States government. urging folks to purchase United States Saving j Bonds, published in The Saturday Evening Post. With accurate insight, he points out that the hope of the government is to sell the bonds to the small town person, and rural home. He points out that the Saturday Evening Post advertising, paid for with taxpayers' money, is reaching plenty of people, but not the class of folks the government seeks to sell the bonds to, by any means. If it U "the little fellow" to whom the government hopes to sell the bonds, then the government could better spend its advertising budget in publications that really reach "the little fellow." The Saturday Evening Post, despite Us nickel price, U certainly not "the little fellow's" publication. It has for years, and still does, stand for the principles and views of the wealthy— the powerful— those that have much, and are not dabbling in low interest U. a Savings Bonds, or making investments at so much per month. Uke Mr. Miller of Livermore, the questions of finance put creases in our foreheads and per- in our minds. Surely the government admen mu»t know what they want, and how But the same advertising budget, placid of fact, if the U. S. Savings Bonds are always "oversubscribed", why do they need any advertising at all? fcAYONETO-AT TEN PACES, IWAMK Hopping mad, Frank Miles, editor of The Iowa • "-, rive, us a four star tongue lashing in a r received last week. The week before that we dared to question the wisdom, statesmanship ton* sensS shown by himself in «•"**"*• in* all over the hides of Governor Kraschel of Iowa, who appointed a non-Legion man to a s&te post and Governor Benson of Minnesota, who said a kind word for the heroes of peace as well as war, ^^ Mr. Miles could see nothing but evil, ex-soldier). Mr. Miles' letter of brotherly SHORT CUTS TO THE NEXT WORLD-Just stand Irt the wash basin and then fix the light socket. Algona has been treated to a deluge of literature by mail enabling one and all, for the small sum of a dollar or two, to learn all about the arts of love, and the pitfalls ofpossion, cash in advance; and sent in a plain wrapper. • * * One way to prevent accidents from high speed would be to put out automobiles with square wheels. And why doesn't somebody suggest to Mr. Lewis or Mr. Martin that THEY get out on the picket lines at the strike fronts which they are so fond of, and try fighting with rocks, axe handles and «as . . . reminds us of the stories about the generals of bygone days ordering their troops to advance to certain death. * • • Last week's Upper Des Moines sold so fast over the counter that It was necessary to call back extra copies sent down to The Smoke Shop . . . the moral is, subscribe and be sure. It's one of thoue little things, but might help someone from being taken by a new racket . . . folks coming into this office and asking for names ot high school graduates, are asked to get an O. K. on their proposition from the supt of schools . . . reason: many of these so-called training schools for high school graduates are dubious as to character; others are perfectly legitimate, better be safe than sorry. • * * It takes many a dull evening to wreck- a home, out Only one entertaining one. * * • Famous Last Une—Stand there white I practice my knife throwing trick. 177 BOMBERS— would stand WASHINGTON.: The U. S. Army House. No last week placed with the Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., -of Santa Monica* California, the largest single order for military aircraft since the World War—177 twin-motored bombers costing $11,651,948.10. Already the world's largest aircraft factory with some 10,000 hands at work, Douglas' backlog of orders went, with this huge contract, to $38,031,828. Although Breat Britain, France; Russia and Germany are aiming at alrfleets of at least 5,000 planes, the U. S. goal is 4,230—with 2,320 planes authorized for the Army, 1.910 for the Navy. Since Jan. 1, the Navy has ordered 248 planes and the Army 178, aside from .fast week's contract By the end of the year the Army expects some 700 deliveries, most of them ordered before Jan. 1. To any spy, most interesting of the new army planes is a gigantic Boeing which last week stood ready in Seattle for first test flights. A 4-motored. mid-wing monoplane of line, similar to the famed Boeing "flying fortreaa" launched two year. ago—of which the army ordered 13 at a reputed $196,000 each—the new bomber is much bigger, much more efficient The new Boeing ls reported to weigh 20 ton., have a speed above 250 m. p. m. with eight tons of bombs, NO THIRD TERM- MANCHESTER, Massachusetts: Questioned by reporters as he arrived to Maaenwter last week to spend loth summer In the Massachusetts North Shore, Edward Mandell House, 78-year-old adviser to the last previous Democratic President flatly predicted: "Roosevelt will not be a candidate for a third term." for In the White American President STEEL TEMPERS- MONROE, Michigan: Biggest U not the first time you have gone out of y«ir*ay to pop at me"-wrong, Mr. Miles, name us people of Algona and Kossuth county probably know the Iowa Legionaire a lot better Jbanthey know The Algona Upper Des Moines."- Ottot* your Kossuth circulation, Mr. Miles. ^•Ihave repeatedly said that the country should have a stronger and more intelligent leadership in public office generally. For your further "»forma- tjon that the editorial profession is afflicted witoW-headi»"-Right, Mr. Miles, as an editor yoursatf, you should know. Frank, my boy, perhaps the work is getting you down, or did Uf« always have such a sour cut- To lend a, serious note, ourselves, to the subject. Governor Kraschel appointed a Legion man to replace Mrs. Alex Miller. n " th " minnr atatfl "- On the minor state ap- John L. Lewis Dictator Estherville Vindicator: The nearest we can figure a dictator is this country is one John L. Lewis. The country is in more danger of him than of President Roosevelt. • • • Lots of Living In t» Years Ringsted Dispatch: We are sorry to see Jean Harlow pass on. She always put a lot of pep in her pictures. But no one can say that Jean didn't get a lot out of those 26 years she spent among us. • * • North Iowa's JaiUess Town Estherville News: Garner doesn't have a jail and Garner is about the only town in the neighborhood not dithered about it. It seems that the people of Garner are so good that one isn't needed. • * » Hobo Gets Hi» Check Now Lehigh Independent Argus: The absence of the once picturesque hobo doesn't indicate that he is gone—he is staying at home so he can get his check from the government. • • • Firing Squad Is Busy Ackley World: Here's a headliner for you: "Russia executes twenty-eight more." True it U that "every dog has his day." Red Russia has had no more regard for human life than the czars that preceded them. Eventually, daylight will penetrate even into darkest Russia; pity tha unfortunate lot of those born in such a lanij. development In John L. Lewis' war on Steel last week was the first appearance of signs that the public was ready to demand law and order and defend the right to work. At Canton, Ohio, anti-strike sentiment quickened when three clergymen, employed to count returns in the Commerce Chamber's poll of 6,465 steel workers by mall, reported 3.633 votes for returning to work ar*d 216 for continuing the strike — a majority, although ' 2,516 ballots were discarded as palpable forgeries because they were not printed on the same paper as those mailed out. In Monroe, Michigan, the city election commission polled workers of the Newtcn Steel Co.— a small Republic Steel subsidiary from which pickets barred ail non-strikers — found that although the Steel Workers Organizing Committee had advised Its members not to vote, 856 favored a return to work and 20 did not — a clear majority of the plant's 1,322 workers. Mayor Daniel A. Knagg. therefore announced *hat the plant would be Opened, dispatched a motley army of police, beardless youngiters, grizzled laborer, and husky War veterans to rout the pickets hold the one road leading to the mill. Although the pickets brandished clubs in defiance for two hours, police and deputies finally marched up six abreast delivered two well-aimed volleys of vomiting gas grenades sent them scurrying over the fields. Mills that were still operating last week Union leaders hoped to soon close by shutting off t!i«ir ore supplies from Michigan, their coal supplies from Pennsylvania, and by having automobile workers refuse to use steel sheets from such mills as Newton Steel. The apparent trend of public opinion in the steel town not only embittered union men but indicated that attempts has ever put to the people the questions Can I take another man's wife and make- Her mine? If he did we would be hearing from the General Federation of Women's clubs in no time." FAT YEARWASHINGTON: President Roosevelt last week remarked at a press conference that he hoped for quick action- in 'Congress on Secretary Wallace's cherished "Joseph" plan for insuring farmers against lean years by storing away part of each bumper crop. Day before, having added up June 1 data from 40,000 farmers and field agents, the Federal Crop Reporting Board released its estimates of the principal U. S. crops for 1937—except corn and cotton on which first reports are made as of July 1 and August 1, respectively. Most accurate to bo had, the figures seemed to suggest that a cycle two years shorter than the Biblical one had entered its second phase and the time had come to apply the "Joseph" plan. After five lean years, U. S. husbandmen were as- I sured not only of the biggest wheat | crop since 1931, but of an export surplus in wheat. In Texas, where harvest hands! are already beginning to drift north | after the first threshings, the Board estimated winter wheat production at about 39,000,000 bu. compared to 17,000,000 bu. last year. In Kansas, greatest U. S. wheat-growing state, the estimate tour 143,8*4,000 bu. of hard winter wtieat compared to 120,000,000 bu. last year. Winter wheat production for the country as a whole will be about 649.000,000 bu., nearly twice that of the drought year, 1933, and 130,000,000 bu. over 1936. Since this is roughly the amount of wheat that goes annually into the U. S. breadbasket, it leaves the equivalent of the entire spring of The American Legion, of articles of mine on Governors Kraschel and Benson, which seerft to have caused something of a storm. Kindly read them through carefully. You will then, I hope, realize you didn't present my side of the picture fairly and accurately in your editorial of June 10. May I call especially to your attention that in the Iowa Legiofiaire article on Kraschel I was not in the Iea.it hateful. I simply tbld the story and expressed a hurt Which many Legion men felt at our organization being ignored after we had done so much to put over tha Social Security bills in the last legislature. Krasch*! replied With some venom arid about that time appointed Hubert Utterback to succeed Legion- alre Matt D. Cooney on the State Board of Parole. I pointed to that and said, for which I have no apology, that Utterback's appointment was objectionable to most Legion- alres because of his record In Congress on veterans' legislation. He voted against the bonus and to sustain the President's veto. He was against Us on national defense and about everything else We proposed. I said' in my statement to the press and radio I did not think Utterback qualified for several other reasons, but that wan not used. You will note that In my Benson article I said I should gladly cooperate In having a day set aside to honor the heroes of peace, but I didn't feel that they should take the veterans' day. Moreover, I objected to his saying that It Is blasphemy to' make saints and heroes of the men of war, the battle slain. I do not think there Is a better and more needed way to fulfill the higher spirit and purpose of Memorial day — veterans' day — than is being done. I do think it is an insult to propose that Memorial day be abolished for soldiers who have offered and given their lives for the nation. This is not the first time you have gone out of you way to pop at me. I hope you enjoy it. You, however; make yourself ridiculous by going off so half cocked. Your saying "editor of an American Legion publication" instead of giving nmae of our paper was plain small. The people of Algona and Kossuth county probably know the Iowa Legtonaire a lot better than they know the Algona Upper Des Moines telligent leadership in public office generally. For your further information I have often said, and I repent, that the editorial profession is afflicted with seme pinheads. You have proved yourselves to be two of them. Now go ahead and rant all yot( like, I'll stand squarely ,on what I write and say with only a smtl* of contempt for people who assart me for siich flimsy reasons as ytftt did. A good fair fight is alt rlgMt but you obviously do not know tttft meaning of fairness. You say you do not. know could arrive at my conclusion* There Is a lot you don't know) which you should. You say it is disappointing tit you. So what? Yours truly, FRANK MILES, Editor Iowa Legionair0< WANT/VPS No Profit This Week I turned the store over to the clerks for one week and I am sure glad they are not running it any longer. They are selling lots of goods, but they are cutting prices and making a genuine clean up of the store. I see where I am coming out at the little end of the horn this week as far as profits are concerned. Going into a deal with this bunch is like getting married—there Is no backing out—you just live up to your word. I promise not to interfere or have a word to say. during their sale. It is like the old two act drama "Grin and Bear It." Here are a few of the things they are doing to me: Handkerchiefs Ic, Anklets, 60, my extra good' 3Sc neckties at 19e. Ladies Chardonese hose, ringless, ravel stop, high splided heel, double sole, a real dressy hose at 19c. Ladles' pure silk hose at 25c. Children's black and brown oxfords, sizes up to big 2 at 49e. Ladles' white slippers that I waa giving away at 35c, they reduced the price to 3flc a pair. Just think of getting a nice easy pair of white slippers with leather soles for 2*e. Men's Rayon underwear 2fcy Ladies' black kid ties, a dressy slipper and a bear for wear at $1.0*. Men's fancy dress sox with lots of wear for every day use at 9e> Men's and boy's polo ahlrta at {So. Boy's chambray work shirts at 35o. Ladies' strap slippers, leather soles, only size 4, out they go at 28c. They put our girls' 98c slacks down to We. They are sure doing things and I am letting them do it for one week only. They are demonstrating the fact that they can run a sale. It is a hard blow to profits and high prices but there Is no way of stopping them unless I serve an injunction on thorn. A» matters now stand they have a freo hand for one week. Jimmie Neville THE SHOE MAN wheat for export—according to the board's best guess, between 175,000,000 and 200,000,000 bu. Because the critical months of May had been kind to winter wheat, brokers on the Chicago Board of Trade were pretty well prepared for the Crop Reporting Board's estimate. Next day, however, despite reports of black rust In Kansas, the price of July wheat dropped from $1.11 to $1.08 per bu. Other estimates: rye, 45,974,000 bu. compared to 25,544,000 bu. in 1936; barley, 200,000,000 to 225,000,000 bu. against 147,452,000 bu. in 1936; oats, between 1,000,000,000 and 1,100,000,000 bu. compared to 789,100,000 bu. in 1936. KIND KILLER— EASTCHESTER, New York: Arrested in suburban Eastchester last month because she was seen feed ing four dogs in a vacant lot and three of them shortly died, Mrs. Juliet Tuttle, 65, wealthy contributor to humane societies, seemed sure to be cleared as her trial opened last week. But other evidence darkened the picture. Found near the spot where she had approached the dogs was a capsule which had contained cyanide of potassium. A former chauffeur of hers testified that he had resigned "in .disgust" because she used to have him stop the car while she got out to give capsules to stray cats, that when the cats keeled over she would deliver them to S. P C. A. shelter, that "she handled as many as 30 cats a day." Old Mrs. Tuttle, who took a nap in court while a score of other witnesses told how their pets had died or become sick after she fed them freely admitted occasional cat killings, "to put them out of their misery. "But," she explained, "I never picked up an animal that was WORD FOB ITI SAY OWNERS OF THE NEW FORD "ECONOMY CAR" licensed or had a home." That was enough for the court would soon be made to open other plants besides the one at Monroe. Meanwhile, John L. Lewis broad- a nd"tne derfsive" spectators who ened his steel front by calling a packe d it. The court offered "kind" strike in Bethlehem's Cambria Mill at Johnstown, Pa., proceeded to call other strikes in 17 coal mines owned by Republic, Youpgstown and Bethlehem. TWO YEARS?—"~~ NEW YORK: Arriving from Europe where she had reported George VTs coronation for the North American Newspaper Alliance, Novelist Kathleen Morris last week declared: "I predict that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor will break up iu less than two years. I base my bet on the letters, some 300 of them a day, that I have been re- reiving from women everywhere during the fast eight years . . . What Mrs. Simpson and the Duke did Mrs. Tuttle the choice of $500 fine or a year in jail. As she paid and walked out, the spectators growled with satisfaction, wished her no luck on her appeal is not the sort of thing we I Register. Editor Thirty-five Years A number of Algona people have received invitations to attend a banquet given by Gardner Cowles at Hotel Fort t>es Moines in Des Moines on Thursday, July 1, in honor of Harvey Ingham's 35th anniversary as editor of the Des Moities Register. Mr. Ingharu, who was the editor of the Algona Upper Dea Moines, sold the Algona paper to Starr & Haggard, in 1902 and joined Mr. Cowles aa editor of the $85 A MONTH, after usual down payment, buys any 1937 Ford V-8 car through the Authorized Ford Finance [Haas of Universal Credit Co. R EAD here about the economy of this Ford V-8 Thrifty "60" —then come in and discover its quality. Its smooth, quiet, V-8 performance. Its roominess and beauty. Its comfort and safety and handling ease. It's the same size car as the brilliant "85"—with a lower price, and m. smaller engine. Just drive it once, and you'll agree that you never met a car lite it/ BEE YOUR FORD DEALER TODAY THE THRIFTY "6O" FORD V-8 THE QUALITY CAB IN THE LOW-PRICE FIELD-AT THE LOWEST PBICE IN YEABSI r%%&y&[%$&^^ KENT MOTOR CO. Phone 434 FORD SALES AND SERVICE Algona, Iowa BARRY'S BEER IS BEST

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