The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on April 4, 1894 · Page 1
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 1

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, April 4, 1894
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, ' ,- ;>,•;--•: '''•'-"; ; —V"-1' yff^v^ ESTABLISHED 1885, ALGONA, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, 1894. VOL, XX1X-NO, 2, There is a place for Everything.' The place to buy your- Groceries is at the .Opera House Grocery. CLEARING SALE- -AT- Ginghams for - - Scents—worth Calico for - - - - 5 cents—worth Outing Flannel for - 5 cents—worth All-wool C. C. Carpet for 50 cents—worth Cotton Carpet for - 20 cents—worth Worsted Dress Goods for 39 cents—worth Worsted Dress Goods for 15 cents—worth Jamestown Dress Goods for 30 cents—worth Jamestown Dress Goods for 40 cents—worth Plaid Dress Goods for - 5 cents—worth Cotton Dress Goods for 10 cents—worth Ribbon for - . - - S cents—worth Ribbon for - - - 10 cents—worth S. 8 to 10 7 8 to 10 65 30 60 35 50 60 10 5 to 20 8 to 10 10 to*2O cents cents cents cents cents cents cents cents ceuts cents cents cents cents Remnants at about half price. Clothing regardless of cost. In shoes we have some good bargains. WALL PAPER, new stock at the lowest prices. . L. GALBRAITfl & CO. SPRING STYLES Goods Now in Stock. Gentlemen: I am now prepared to sell clothes cheaper than I ever sold them before; not for the reason that goods can be bought any cheaper, but on account of the up-hill times that we are passing through, Goods must be sold, and those wishing to buy should look over my stock at once and make their selections. I will guarantee as good goods and work as the best, My prices will compare favorably with the cheapest in this part of the country, I have a nice line of woolens, bought especially for Ladies' Capes and Jackets; also an especially nice line of woolens for Boys' Suitings of novel styles. -I am selling steamship tickets to any port in Europe or America, Tickets from Scandinavia to Algona only $39.55. I also sell money orders on Eu' rope, Tickets from Algona to Scandinavia only $41.50, Come and see me. Brownell & Allred, [Successors to Wm, Cordingley.] Fine Foot Wear, Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, Best goods and lowest prices, MNISHM UP THE WORK. T?he Iowa Legislature is Keating 1 the End of the Session, and Will Soon Be Dong. About 143 New Laws Have Been Signed by the Governor—Many Are of No Consequence. , DBS MOIMES, April 8.— The past has been the busiest week of the entire session, The adjournment date having been fixed, rapid progress has . been made in legislation, All of the regular appropriation bills have been passed. The appropriations have been kept down so that there will practically be no increase in state taxation. N6 new department for the state government has been created; very few new s offlces have been provided for. The code commission, of course, provides for five new officers, but their service will be only temporary, No board of control, such as was advocated by Governor Boies, and which he tried to make a leading feature of his campaign, will be created. The state institutions will be managed in the future, as in the past, by boards of trustees, regents, etc. Tomorrow the general assembly will suspend business for awhile and will hold a little ceremony in the house of representatives in celebration of the ninetieth birthday of Hon. Geo, W, Jones of Dubuque, who was the first Uuited States senator from Iowa, and who acted an important part 40 years ago. Senator Lewis' bill restricting the loans that may be made by state banks to their own officers has passed both houses, The number of laws created will be over rather than under the average of former years. Governor Jackson has already affixed his signature to as many as 125 laws, a vast majority of them being of no special pujjlic consequence. An act has been adopted, by both houses requiring the destruction of the Russian thistle, Kail roads must destroy it if it is on their right of way and road supervisors must see to its destruction. A motion to reconsider the vote by which the bill passed giving women the power to vote at municipal elections carried and the bill was again brougbt before the house. Amendments were made restricting the vote to city, town and scfeool offices and it was again passed. All of the bills pertaining to changes in the road law have been defeated because there could be no agreement reached as to what should be done. The roads matter will go on undisturbed and unchanged until there shall be more agitation and more education. A bill has passed both houses regulating the fees to be drawn by constables and justices. The bill is too long to be embodied in this letter. Justices of the peace in townships having 4,000 population must pay into the county treasury all fees in excess of $600 per annum; in townships above 4,000 and less than 10,000 the justice can retain $800. The highest salary allowed to a justice in any place is $1,500 per annum. Constables fees are disposed of in about the same way, except that no constable anywhere can retain over $1,200 per annum. The Davis bill has passed authorizing boards of supervisors to select one or more persons within the county to keep school books and supplies for sale and to Insure the safety of the books, their moneys, etc,, the board shall require each agent to give a bond. The general assembly will go away leaving its calendars loaded with bills that have been printed and that will never receive consideration. The adjournment, sine die will be on Friday at noon, then the Twenty-fifth general assembly will have taken its place in history. What will be the verdict as to its labors? Governor Jackson has been devoting his whole time to the consideration of bills that have passed both houses. Ho has practically no time to see visitors and it must be indeed a relief to him for the reason that the pressure upon him by persons seeking appointments has been entirely without precedent. It may be presumed that part of this extra pressure comes from the fact that we had a democratic governor for four years and some of our good, earnest republican workers have been out in the cold. It is an interesting study to notice the bills that are regarded as important up to and beyond the middle of the session dwindle and disappear thereafter, Who does not remember the things most talked about when the session began? Aside from the liquor question, there was the most talk about the proposed new revenue law and the proposed new road law. The new liquor law has been made, but the pther two matters go over as unfinished business to be discussed for two more years. It may well ba concluded also that the innocent purchaser bill; the proposition to tax mortgages; the valued, policy bill in regard to insurance; the bill to affix the price of telegraphing from one point to another point in Iowa: the proposition to give the State University a permanent endowment', the two-cent fare proposition; the proposition to subject private banks to public examination; the proposition to pay school directors for their time employed, and many other propositions that from year to year come before the general assembly will go over until some future time without having been enacted into law. In fact, radical laws only follow radical agitation in the prevlus campaign, and such radical agitation has not been had. L. YOUNG. " A Pair At tbe opera, bouse, tomorrow evening, seems to have gained, steadily in popularity sine® itjs, pro^uflHpn ejg>t Ago. The play depends for Interest upon bright repartee, clever hits, and droll stage effects, the action being consequently dominated by a spirit of exaggeration and burlesque, The lh" troductiou of an old countryman into a city restaurant and his sudden ,tfansi' Won to a prison through an unexpected series of complications affords the field. TflE MOffffi'8 MA&A21NE8. tfho April Midland Monthly i§ full of good reading. Odd Corners in Scotland are described by G. W. E. Sill, B. **, Tillinghast tells about the Iowa Russian relief fund, an excellent sketch Is given of Judge McDlll, Tbe Colorado Grasshopper and The Parson's Romance nre clever stories, the former a picture of farming in Colorado, Editor Brlgbam writes entertainingly of art and drama in London, and excellent poems nil their accustomed space. Tho frontispiece Is a very fine portrait of loxva's noted story writer " Octave Thanet." and fine illustrations are plentiful throughout the number. The May number will have an illustrated article on Dakota artesian wells and Prod Lehman will have a paper on Justice Miller. Every lowan should send for the Midland. - Tho April Century makes a new departure in printing a story told wholly in pictures. Tho artist is Andre Castaigne, whose world's fair pictures and other drawings for The Century are well known. The subject Is the course of the emigrant From the Old World to the New, and the scenes represented are typical experiences, In the Fields of Old Europe, Hard Times, On the Deep, The Land of Promise, etc. • • M • The April number of St. Nicholas rings down the curtain upon Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, and Toinette's Philip, by Mrs. Jamison. This would be sorrowful intelligence to the magazine's young ad. mirers, were it not the rule for them to say, like the courtiers of old, the old serial is finished, long live the new serial. In the present number, without waiting for the few last words of its predecessors, we see begun the reign of the new serial, Jack Ballister's Fortunes, by Howard Pyle, with his own exquisite illustrating. Besides Mrs. Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward's story, The Oath of Allegiance, the April Atlantic contains two contributions relating to war. They are Mr. Eben Greenough Scott's historical paper, General Lee during the Campaign of the Seven Days, and a paper on War's Use of the Engines of peace—railroads, electricity, and inflammable oils—by General Joseph L. Brent of the Confederate army. -4--*Scribner's Magazine for April opens with the second of Octave Thanet's sketches of American Types, suggested by her observations among the state buildings during the world's fair. In this article she describes The Farmer in the South, whom she knows very well at home, as it is her custom to spend every winter on a plantation in Arkansas. The illustrations by A. B. Frost are in his very best manner. One of the most impressive short stories that Thomas Nelson Page has written is The Burial of the Guns in this number. It is a dramatic episode of the very end of the rebellion. it In variety, originality and excellence the April number of Romance is not surpassed by any of its predecessors. Its leading features are a powerful society story by Arthur Beardsley Mitchell and a group of three thrilling narratives of adventure, all written expressly for this magazine. Besides these, which are all American, there are stories of Spain, France, Germany, England and Japan: a good ghost story; charming love stories by Julia Schayer, Harriet Prescott Spofford and S. Elgar Benet; one of the strangest fantasies of Alphonso Daudet; a strong tale, of the western mines; and many others of uncommon merit in different lines. Romance is issued by Romance Publishing company, Clinton Hall, Astor Place, Now York, at 25 cents a number; subscriptions, $3.50 a year. A sample copy of a back number will be sent for 10 cents. DON'T forget that the Opera House Grocery keeps good butter. BUCKLEN'S ARNICA SALVE, • The beat salve iu the world for bruises, outs, sores, ulcers, salt rheum, fever sores, tetter, chapped hands, chilblains, corns and all skin eruptions, and positively cures piles or no pay required. It is guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction or money refunded. Price 35c a box. Sold by L. A. Shoetz. J. F. PRESTON, M. D., IjIMITBD TO Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat MASON CITY, IOWA. Spectacles scientifically fitted and guaranteed. At Dr. Stull's office, Friday, April 27. Millinery. Latest Styles, Finest Stock, Are now prepared to show customers and intending purchasers one of tbe finest and most varied stocks of millinery goods to be seen iu this section. It has been selected with special ref erence to the wants of this community, and we have no hesitancy in say- that we can satisfy the most fastidious as to price or quality. LATEST JN TRWJNG constitutes an especial feature of our business, We are prepared to filial! orders promptly. We want your pat- ponje and ioofc at puj? goods, Hard Times Prices. Perts..,,.-. , ,10d 'Beans ,. ...........lOc Com. .<....OfSo , All New Goods,- 1 pound Salmon ,, JOc 2f pounds Peaches. JOc 2i pounds Tomatoes., ,,....lOc California Goods— 2i pounds G. G. Plums..,......... ,16c 2i pounds Apricots................ .I6e 2-j- pounds Nectarines ., »16o 24 pounds Peaches. J5c 25 pounds Sugar, . , . $1,00 30 pounds D Currants, . 1.00 PailJelly, .,:'..' .50 Pail Syrup, . : . . .50 We also carry a full line of " Club House" goods,—^fl* Langdon & Hudson, CARPETS CARPETS, CARPETS Our new Spring Samples will soon be here at much lower prices ; until they arrive and to clear old stock we will sell SAMPLES now on hand at one- half original cost. Now is the time to select suitable pieces for Rugs, Upholstery, etc. Come soon before the assortment is broken, as they will go at prices offered. The Grange Store. Coming! Coming! Coming! The Fourth Car Load of that Flour will arrive this week at the new store. IFer Sa-olr, - - J7O No family can afford to keep house without it, Remember the place: Cowles block. JAMES PATTERSON If" 37-0-0. OUT Btudley's Iowa, for a free sample of a iur© Our© Reme4y, 0, fc, [Successors to 0. L. Lund—Established 1880,] EEAL ESTATE DEALERS We wish to announce to the readers of TB« UPPER pus MOIHOS that we have extraordinary facilities (or the selling of (arms ana ujjimpsoved lands in northern Iowa, and we SY"~ all W(LO wish to dispose ot weir property to can on us at our pJ8.ce In 41gona. or w coxresp with us- g^Assooa as spring opens we h^ve a large number or oustowers from tto} eaJ tates #ho are ready to opnw oat and secure ft plese <tf low* soil at reajjonajrte rates,, Wl

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