The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on March 22, 1893 · Page 5
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 5

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Wednesday, March 22, 1893
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Page 5
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THE tJPPER M2S MOINES: ALGONA, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1803. We Walk Around Competition. It is a conceded fact that we can walk away from every competitor on the score of goods and prices. WE LEAD IN QUALITY Competition comes puffing along behind, but never catches us. We are always a little ahead of them in every line. But when it comes to quality, WE ARE ALWAYS AHEAD of everything. No firm dares or dreams of giving so much for a dollar as we do. This season we open with as fine an assortment of new and stylish goods as anyone could ask to see. They are the best that money buys. The value is in them. The purchase price was close to cost of production. The selling price will be close to purchase price. The result is BARGAINS FOB YOU ALL. WE ABE SELLING- HT, at prices as close to production as we can make them and live. WIDE-AWAKE BUYEBS will find our store full of BIG-, BBILLIANT BABG-AINS. We have got the stock of the season and for the season. A +~r\ x r/-n o /VA /^i~i^\ T Qo\ r^t-r> ^ y° u are > don't waste time hunting round for the place to buy at money-saving prices Are you a iviuney octveir but come stra i g h t to the WIDE-AWAKE STORE—the NEW ENGLAND CLOTHING HOUS H KEPT BY LJ Only exclusive Clothing House in town.. P. S.—Don't forget to look at our large stock of Trunks and Valises—just received. EAILVAY TIME OAEDS. Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. LOCAL TRAIN EAST. Way passenger departs at 2:20 p m Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Minneapolis train*— No. 2 departs at 10:24 am No. 4 departs at 0:30 pm TRAINS WEST. VTay passenger departs at 11:45 a m Tkrough passenger—No. 3 at 4:37 p m Through passenger—No. 1 at 0:02 a m No. 1 dally, except Sunday. No. 4 dally, except Saturday. Chicago & Northwestern Railway. North- Mixed 8:18a m Pai» 3:Slpm South- Pass 3:33pm Mixed.... ... 0:07pm Freight 10:00 a m Freight.... 10:00 a m Pass, arrives at Chicago at 7 a m; arrives at DCS Molnes at 8:15 p m. Lv. Des M. 2:30 a m THE CITY. Hogs are down to $6.50. Carter's Cleveland Bay stallion is for sale. Geo. E. Clarke is able to be about again after a week spent indoors. Miss Gilbert is now stenographer for Hamilton Bros, in their lumber office. . Dlngley's drug store Is to move Into the west room of Galbraith's store about April 15. Fully three inches of snow fell last night. The ground was pretty clear and dry before. The spring term of the normal school opens next Tuesday. It has special features for teachers, ' 41 Link" Singleton Is now working for Wadsworth Bros. They have two colored jockeys with their horses. Burt is planning on a new Methodisl church, wants to incorporate, and is adding a new department to the town school. There will be an Eastern Star chapter next Tuesday night. It is hoped every member will come and hear the pro- gramme. The Odd Fellows will hold a special meeting on Thursday evening of this week. Business of Importance to all members. John Patterson Is feeling proud over a fine single-comb Brown Leghorn rooster he has just received from Washington, this state. It is a beauty The new school board met Monday afternoon and organized by choosing Geo.»E. Clarke president. The choice of other officers does not come until fall The Whlttemore Champion counts 'up 20 new buildings that will be buil this spring In and about that city. I says that contracts are now being let for the new brick block. J, F. Lacy moved yesterday Into the Lund house which he traded for last fall, and Mr. Hay moved Into the Sample house east of J. E. Stacy's. I was a trade about for the two families The closing exercises of the spring term of the normal school will be belt tomorrow evening at the normal hall They include a fine literary and musl oal programme, to which all are in Ytted. P. A,\pultraan was in town last week on his vQ^yaioknjw, Neb., where b las bought a store. He says P. G. Schneider, Ramsay's old time resident, s there blacksmithing and making money. Letters remain uncalled for in the Algona postoffice for Miss Mary Broderson, S. D. Clarke, Chas. L. Folk, Peter Govern, two, Charlie Jarvis, W. Johnson, Ed. Kinnie, John Miller, kelson Wheeler. S. S. Sessions is confined to his room with his lame ankle and will be for a week at least. He draws some consola- ,ion from the fact that he has an accident insurance policy which gives him 50 a week while disabled. Three new babies arrived within a 'ew hours last week. Friday evening a little girl was added to Harry Dodge's amily, and Saturday morning a boy at 3. J. Gilmore's home and a girl at A. S. Forbes' completed the trio. It is rumored that the Burt post- office will go to Miss Mamie McDonald. This is as it' should be. No ladins have Deen elected school directors in the county and Kossuth is getting behind, """•ive the ladies the postoffices. All lady readers of THE UPPER DES MOINES should notice the announcement of Mrs. Dr. Everett to give a.free •ecture to them tomorrow afternoon at o'clock in the Congregational church. She comes very highly recommended. Prominent democrats from Jefferson, Boone, and Garner were in town last evening to see Messrs. Taylor and Ryan. The latter returned from Fort Dodge yesterday, and laughs about the letter lent by his opponents to the Register. The high school declamatory contest to select a representative for the state contest at Grinnell will be held by April 7, or perhaps earlier. Prof. Dixson is making definite arrangements which will be announced in due season. Martin Jordan moved into town Friday from Portland and has rented one of the Grove houses until he can build. It is reported that he intends to put in a large cold storage house this season, which will be an important addition to Algona. Mrs. Marion Hedrick while in St. Paul a week ago secured a very handsome painting on tapestry from a friend there to dispose of it here for her. It will be exhibited to the public and no doubt soon be owned in Algona. It is a very fine work of art. . Frank Lindon went squarely back on his agreement to play in Algona. He is the same old Frank. The last thing he did when he left town before was to try to beat David Paterson out of his pay for hauling baggage, and before that he had tried to beat Landlord Tennant. The plasterers are now at work on the second stqry of A. D. Clarke's brick block. He is finishing up a fine hall, which will be a valuable addition tc Algona. For dances and all socia: gatherings it will be a great improve- iihent on anything the town , has had thus far. For the first time in many years the Grove family are entirely out of the livery, business in Algona. John sole v ' isv i last week to Mr. Bradley and jjpka, and has gone west with ft Wmit Or8 es for Dakota. Uncle Isaac I M "' iegan the business and aooom 1 ? , A the public many years, and In fro* lis sons have all been genial and affa- sle liverymen. We are sorry to see hem all out of it. N. J. Skinner is having a lively time it ten ding to business during his brother's absence. He goes to Bancroft svery night and back in the morning. Vliss Boals is acting as stenographer in he Algona office and Guy Pettibone as- ists at Bancroft, and Mr. Skinner uperintends both. C. E. Heise announces himself a candidate for the postoffice succession. We have mentioned his claims before, and hope to see them receive a deserved attention. He is an old citizen, has >een a firm Cleveland man, and would >e independent and impartial in attending to the office. A lot of fine aluminum world's fair souvenirs are shown in Durdall & Co.'s show windows, and are for distribution to their customers. Those who don't jet a Columbian half dollar should get 5ne of these. And all should read the jig advertisement in this issue, and visit our big clothing store. Between rheumatism and visiting delegations of postoffice applicants Jas. Taylor has been having a pretty hard iime of it the past winter. He is think- .ng some of a trip to the hot springs if "10 can get away, and of getting the heumatism disposed of. Then he will le ready to attend to the offices. Col. Spencer received' a letter from Washington in this state Saturday stating that his mother was dangerous- .y ill,-and Monday a telegram telling lim to come at once. He went on the 5rst train. Mrs. Spencer was in perfect health while in Algona and went a short time ago to visit her other relatives. The tongue can be an unruly member in more ways than one, as G. M. Johnson had reason to believe last week. His became inflamed in some way and swelled up so as to completely fill his mouth. For three days he could not eat nor talk. At one time Dr. Morse thought of lancing it, but the swelling finally disappeared. Lumber is being piled up these days for the new Wolf building near the Northwestern depot, the new house Jas Patterson and D. Hine will build, the new house J. D. Shadle is putting in near his own, and the Herman house near Mr. Lantry's. Work will begin on these at once, and plans for many other new buildings are being made, This week closes the present term of public school, and a week's vacation follows. With this term Miss Edith Call closes her work as a teacher in the school, a position she has hold foi several years. She has been rcynrdcd by all as one of tho most efficient leii.eh- ers, and her place will be hard to 1111. The board elect a successor tomorrow. Passenger Agent S.' B. Jones of tho Northwestern was in town yest.e.rdny. He says the western compiinies meet this month to decide on world's fail rates. He thinks they will ho a fun and a third, with half faro on spec occasions. A.fare and a third is about $16 from Algona. For $25 or $30 a person can see Chicago pretty well if ho lives economically. The-postoffloe contest in Algona is active out fortunately, in view uf tho disgraceful row at Fort Dodge, pum ,ble. Petitions have been circulated or J. W. Hinchon and D. S. Ford, and both have been signed by both republi- ans and democrats. The other candidates have no petitions as yet. We understand that they favor an election as the best method of testing public ientiment. A. B. Sheldon of Burt, who has the •eputation of being one of best road supervisors in the county, has a word on roads this week. This ought to stir others up to write something on the subject. Now is the time for discus- lion. Mr. Sheldon don't discuss what changes, if any, he would sug- est in the present method of town- ihip work. We should like to hear "rom him on that. The regular monthly meeting of the ocial Union club comes Friday even- ng with a very interesting pro- gramme. John G. Smith is to have a japer on our common birds, Milton Starr will discuss the Hawaiian ques- ,ion, Miss Edith Clarke will give a •eading. The large increase in attendance at these meetings will soon iompel the officers to borrow the ' Standing room only" sign of the opera louse, or to move into the body of the hurch. The secretary says the W. C. T. U. will meet in the reading room on Friday at 3 o'clock. In some unaccountable way the report has gone out that the W. C. T. U. has disbanded. This is a great mistake. They have not lone so, and what is more they have no intention of so doing. If the report has kept anyone from coming to the reading room we must earnestly hope this will set them right and that we may see a large number present on Friday afternoon of this week. The new city council met Monday evening, Mayor Call, and Aldermen Wadsworth, Garfield, Cordingley, and Hutchins all being present. The only business transacted worth mentioning was the appointment of !ommittees-by the mayor as follows: Streets and alleys, Wadsworth, Cordingley and Hutchins; ordinances, Vesper, Hinchon and Garfield; printing, Vesper, Magnusson and Nicoulin; water worits, Nicoulin, Hinchon and Wadsworth; sanitary, Garfleld, Cordingley and Hinchon; to settle with treasurer, Hinchon and Hutchins. Mike O'Rourke was up Saturday looking for the supervisors, and they in turn are looking for somebody else. 11 seems that a county bridge down in his neighborhood has not been much used and somebody has gone and cut the piling out from under it, and if the high water this spring hits it the coun ty'will bo out abridge. At first it was rumored that it was the river bridge but we learn that it is a small bridge that has never bern put in crossabl condition. We republish this week a letter from Fort Dodge to the State Register on the postoffice fight there solely as tmittor of news of local interest, leav ing out one paragraph. It illustrates tho worst features of the scramble for office under a upoils system. It shows how essential it-is that the whole post olllcu business be brought to a system under \vhich officials shall be cheaei for- regular terms In a well^ord thoroughly-understood. minnej 1 factory to tho pnbUn, ucys ' of personal wrong in principle, and this letter shows how it works in practice. In this connectioon it is worthy of note that Mr. Duncombe disclaims any knowledge of this letter or responsibility for it. It is reported that Mr. John Adam- on, the owner of Blairgowrie near Emmetsburg and also at one time of many housands of acres of land in Humboldt ind Kossuth, has recently died in Scot- and. It was only a few years ago that A.V. Adamson was an Algona visitor, .ttending a county fair, inspecting Mr. jund's farm, and spending a couple of iays with Mr. Paton of New York here. Ie was a man of immense wealth, hav- ng one of the finest estates in Scotland, a line of steamers, and many investments in this country. The Blairgow- ie farm contains 13,000 acres. On the evening of Thursday, March 9, Mrs. G. S. Wright of West Bend suffered a stroke of paralysis which af- ected the right foot and entirely stopped the circulation of blood in part of it. The doctors agreed that there was no possibility of recovery except by amputation and this was performed Thursday, the 16th, by Drs. Bachman of West Bend, Davies of Emmetsburg, and Livingston of Bode. Mrs. Wright mssed through the operation bravely, ind is doing well and improving. She ias many friends in Algona and over the county who will be pleased to learn of her final recovery. Sunday morning a telegram went over the wire stating that Spencer was laving a big fire. It was thought at irst that the whole town was burning, jut the facts are that only nine build- .ngs were destroyed. Mrs. Taylor was ;here and says that the fire began in the second story of a restaurant on the east side of the main street in the first row of buildings south of the depot. There was no water and no way to check the flames. Several of the build- Ings were new and valuable, one just completed and not insured. There was not much wind and the fire burned slowly. As it burned towards the north it could not have swept the town in any event. The address by Miss Francis Griffon of Montgomery, Ala., drew a large audience at the Congregational church Sunday evening to hear about tho work being done by the Woman's Christian Temperance union. She is one of the authorized representatives of that order, and has been traveling continuously for the past twelve months. She spoke of the work in school, the temperance temple in Chicago, the publication society, and all the various avenues through which the influence of the society has made itself felt. She is an intimate acquaintance of Miss Willard and Lady Henry Somerset, who, she says, are doing more to change the old south than all other forces together. Miss Giffen is a very interesting talker In public and private, and her visit to Algona was enjoyed by all who met her. Her father was a warm friend of Jefferson Davis, and she is a thorough southerner by birth and education, but says the war ended when Lee surrendered. BBINO in your faded hats and have them colored at the weaving and dye yyorHe- W. T. Cunpinghaja,— $% J .1, _. _^ ,. j, ( •• * t•" ',\ PERSONAL MOVEMENTS. Dr. Glasier's wife is off in Michigan visiting her relatives. J. W. Hay enjoyed a. visit from a younger brother last week. Jay McCall is home from Colorado, where he has been working at railroading. W. L. Joslyn started Friday on a ten- days' trip to Kansas to look over some lands there. Thos. F. Cooke returned yesterday after a week's visit in St. Paul, and Wisconsin cities. Will McGee of Evansville, Wis., was present at Mrs. Patterson's funeral on Friday. She was his sister. Mr. and Mrs. Chrischilles and Geo. C. Gall are expected home from their Texas sojourn the last of this month. Norman Hartwell sends to have his paper addressed to Billings, Missouri, instead of Growley, La., as heretofore. We judge he is working north again. Mrs. Jus. Taylor went to Spencer Saturday to attend the funeral or Mrs, Jo. West. Mrs. West was her guest at the opera house opening in perfect health. Last Wednesday she was taken with inflammation of the bowels, and Thursday afternoon she died. Her remains are to be taken to New York for burial. A Card to the Public. I understand that a petition is being circulated in connection with the Algona postoffice stating that there are only two candidates. I desire, therefore, to announce that I have been and am a candidate for that position when Mr. Starr's term expires. C. E. HEISE. House and Lot for Sale. Good residence on corner lot, on Thorington street, for sale cheap for cash.-52t2 JOHN C. PATTERSON. ' ORR & PATTERSON do all kinds of painting, paper hanging, and sign work very reasonably, and do good work, Spring Farm Goods. Come and see our new seeders. We have a full line of new implements, and new prices. The best fanning mill in the market, warranted to clean wheat from cockle better than any other mill made. A new line of carriages. A. M. & G. M. JOHNSON. FOR list of lands for sale and information about Charles Mix, the best county in South Dakota, write to Lucas Bros., Castalia, S. D.-52t8 AL,L kinds of carpet made at the weaving and dye works. W. T. Cunningham.—52 FOR SALE—A good organ for $40. Inquire of Fred. Bronson. F. S. STOUGH has a harness maker, does repairing, god makes all his own harn,ejs, B J .

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