The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on January 13, 1892 · Page 6
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 6

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Wednesday, January 13, 1892
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W9ttf$ ALGOKA, IOWA.S been BT means of a bath of liquid nitrons acid and bisulphide of carbon, a ature of 220 d?g. below zero has produced. _ JGBT think o! it! T*:ere were 240.000.000,000 cigarettes manufactured in {bis country last year, and yet thirty stales prohibit boys from using them. THE fall of an inch of rain, as recorded by the rain-gauce, meats the decent of 100 tons of water on every acre of ?and surface. HITHERTO man has obtained from cotton fuel, clothing, cooking-oil, feraiiKrs, *oapj and cake, and now it is claimed tba« s-jjrr can be extracted from it. _ ( BEAIUKGS constructed of compressed wood pnlp are the outcome of some ingenious mechanic. Combined with graptite they require no lubrication, and greatly reduces friction. The componcd can be cut o. dried like metal, and almost as hard. A djnamo is stated to have been fitted with these beariegs with satisfactory results. THE liverymen of London are gettine up a subscription for the purpose of buying a residence for Prince Albert Tictor, the deeds of which will be tendered to him as a wedding- present. The liverymen must not be confounded with those who earn their living by stable keening and carriage letting. T hey are members of the old livery or guild companies, and in their ranks have the richest gnsraT-.je-e reb?! tribes {fee arrive} in reset! f»-r Fi A BKCir:ro*;TTfer«»tr wiUs prosaalgaSeii !>y rrwiil^at Harnsos. Cot* C. T. tsTjjfsJi. rfwatlj are govtraor »f Oa*,«L\ died Sncdsj-. " THREE TK« CSASO eyerslire* m t A stCESsrri, test of tfce b-ireau of &eiat«I la in BEECS day c,>»mi?«iwH-d Benrr Bsrreti Cfcsuu- bertin first ii«itenaat of "Comrftny M. Firs? Infantry. U N. G. A BiLt Jt^aj-ing tie k>ft«T ba=ins« a felcny ha? t«srn iairivJuced" in tbe Ken " a former era n- .iaclc orator, has lecij declared isisaas al Detroit. Two hundred miners at Cable. 11)., bare struck for a restoration of tfce fenuer rsSe of merchants and leading dealers of the big city of London. THB Philadelphia academyjof science has decided to send an expedition to northern Greenland in the spring, for the relief of Lieutenant Peary and his little piirty, who were foolhardy enough to winter thr-re- The wife of the lieutenant persisted in re ruaining with him, and her probable fate adds to the general anxiety. Even if the whole party shall be brought back alive, it is doubtful whether they will have ac quired any information of such utility as to compensate for the sufferings endured. ACCORDING to the report of the secretary of the interior, there are 675,160 pensioners carried on the rolls, 23 of whom are widows or daughters of revoln- tioary soldiers, and there are 559,027 applications on hand from person* who are not HOW on the rolls. .The expenditures are nearly $145,000,000. The secretary estimates that this may rise fcin the future to $160,000,000, but it will soon drop to $130,000,000 when all first payments have been mad', and that there will Ihen be a rapid and continuous decline. \INTJIAX CYCLOXK MZMOIKS. ^ The meteorological department of the Indian government has recently published the results of an inquiry into the nature and course of storms in the Arabian Sea. These researches apparently show that the cyclones are formed on the northern limits of tho southwest monsoon. When the - ne'.hern limits of the monsoon reach the land, and when the northeast monsoon ex tends from Asia to the equator, no great storm is generated in the Arabian sea. The results of this inquiry are important as showing that the real cause of the cyclones is to be sought in the conflict of the regular southwest monsoon current with the opposing northerly currents moy. ing from the Asiatic continent toward the equator. According to the prevailing theory, cylones are generated where there are great vertical differences of tempera ture, giving rise to ascending currents There are, however, no evidences of the existence of such conditions in the Arabian Sea at the p?riods of maximum storminess. ABOUT PEOIM.K. Labouchere says that the Princess Mary, who is engaged to Collars and Cuffs, is decidedly pretty. "I remember remarking hor as a pretty girl," he add?, "one day when ahj was on the terrace of the house of commons, before I knew who she was, so that my judgment was not warped by any^ udgmen*, in favor of her, a princess as a'rule, being deemed beautiful if she is not exceptionally uolv." * * * •'<=•' Glaus Spreckels, the sugar king,-is n man of swarthy face, which contrasts sharply with his white hair and white THE value of grain exported from San Frauci?c> las* year wa« $33 205.009.i«un*t 922, 114,000 the preceding year. _ THE Rie Flour Millers" association, of New York, has fixed the price of IT* floor at from $5 25 to to 35 per barrel GOT. CAMPBELL, of Ohio, is president of tbe.Qbio Mining company. incorpcraSed in Duintb. Minn.. Uondav" \riih a capital stock of SLOOO.OOO. ; " IJT his annual mes^se to the council, Mayor Grant of New York strongly ursres the citieeBS to iujuipnrate a movement tor representation at the world's fair. BISHOP W. PEKKIXS bus been appointed United States senator from Kansas to succeed tne late Preston B. Piarab. CHIEF BCSHTHKAD. vi-chief of the Cherokee nation, ditd Wedjiosdav night at Tahlequah, I.T., aged65 years. " Gov. NORTHERX, of Georgia, in a letter bearing on the world's fair ques tions, says that the state "must be repre sented." ROSWELL B. ' MASON, who was mayor of Chicago at the uioe of the great fire in 1876, died at his residence, of congestion of the brain Friday night. THE navy' department reiterates its de- aiais of war preparadoES. but the tecre- tarj conferred with many heads of departments Monday. _ THB president is preparing a proclamation of retaliation against the countries which have refused to enter ,nto reciprocal trade relations with this country. CAPT. GABKIEL&OX, comrnanJine the revenue steamer Gallatine, made a report to the treasury department, corifirniing the press dispatches in regard to the Joss of that steamer, and the death of Jacobson, the carpenter. THERE is..a story current in Bridgeport, Conn., that to prevent the work of ghouls, a dummy was substituted for the real body at the funeral of P. T. Barnum and that the remains were hidden away until all danger of grave-robbery was past. CHARLUS GABDSEB, Yale professor of LatiE, and J. Lawrence Laughlin, profes- or of political economy in Coinell Uni- , TTTO MKS w*r* kiU'ed and another .-fatnl- Thsirt ia * ravage Mre*t fight at Ferrv, Fis. " •.-."" THE paymaster of a mininc coaspany at , Mki»., tras robbed and mur- " MOSOAT Cias. tebear. a cripple, drauk *na jeakMs, fatally sbot his wife and then him* If a{ Si, LOTUS, Mo: DR, GRAVES, en trial in Denser for rcrisoniasr Mrs Barnaby, wsu found auiitr t.f mardw in the Erst degree. woman st Pittsburg, fatally fc?r child by throwing it from the steps of a church as a sacrifice." AT St. Louis * Monday Charles Lebear, ias L*Ro*!\ a cripple, drunk and je.ilou-. sh&i and fatally wounded Ms wife and thea c:m:aiUed suicide. DR. GRATES, convicted of the murder of Sirs. Barnaby a> Denver, makes a confession implicating Col. Ballon of Providence, R. L, ia his crime. THE Wei's Fargo express offi :e at Houston, Tex., has b^en robbed of a package containing $10,000 or more. AT Grayville La., L. : N. Disbar- non and Gal. Foster, charged with the murder of a Jewish peddler, a week ago, were laken from jail and lynched by a mob last night. ' HIGHWAYMEN he!u up ii stage coach in Montana Saturday night. Edward'L. Huntloy, a Chicago traveling man, lost his watch and diamonds, which he claim* were worth $14,000. AT Spiingfield, 111., a well-dressad German, sged about 25 years, committed suicide Saturday night. He came there \N ednesday with a woman: she deserted him Thursday. The man said his name was Q. A. Miller. ^ ' TUESDAY- morning William Kebnick siot (red Weber at Kebnick's own f arm near Eiyrian, Minn. Weber went to the home of Kebnick at about 3 o'clock in the morning and knocked the latter down with a cbair, also abusing his wife. K-H;- nicfc then took his shotgun 'and killeJ Weber. • '' : reducing letter po-tace to j ?o «t?nd the free msil *>ej 1T ? r T tcr the 5m year: for the erec- prtblic buildings at- D;catur. HI-, 3:«»j. Ic> mi, uud Cie-'son. Iowa: Ai'its 84.{KX).OQO for !fe? we'ion of a*p<vsioffie?and court building in Chicago, and rr-guIatineth?FaIe of _dynRuii'e so as to curtail the ''crank'* business. WRDXE^DAT, J«n. 6. \ SENATE --A prolonged discussion occur- i red on the subject of silver legislation, but no .TOts was taken, .ItousE—Senator Washbnrn's pint resolution appropriating §100,000 for the transportation of flour to the poor of Russia was killed, after a long discussion THURSDAY, Jan. 7. : HOUSE.—The following bills were introduced and referred: By Mr. Hermann, of Oregon, granting pensions to Indian war soldiers^ by Mr. Dalzeil, of Pennsylvania, for a survey of a ship canal to ccm- nse' Lnke Erie and the Ohio river; by Mr. Bingham. to reduce postage on first-class matter; by Anierman (Pa) proposing a constitutional amendment for a uniform marriage and divorce law; bv Pickler (S. D.) fixing tbo minimum pension rate at $C pe DIAMQHDSI STABS; | Gen?? Fonml in Ati Arittfta "Meteorite Foira An Absorbing Subject ; for Speculation; HaVP: Lite Wlief^lliis Particular Me teorite Came From. An Interesting Story by FH'lV.H>niT . ; A: Ward of An Extraordinary month; By Stewart (I'exas) to promote re--•---" —'"- " - also fixing the yt>ars; by Grout fraction.il silver ciprocity with Mexico;' presidential term at six (Vt.). for the issue of certificates; also for a concessional representative from Alaska; by Miller (Wis.) versify, have accepted offers of chairs in Chicago university at $7,000 each. OBITUARY: At Cincinnati, Surgeon W, H. Long, United States army, aged forty- two.—At Monmouth, lll.,Cbauncev Hordin, aged seventy-seven.—At Boston, Jo«ph W. Clark, agpd eighty one.—At Grand Rapids, Mich., Jacob Barth, a*ed any-—At Palestine, Texas, Carter Harrison, nephew cf the president. .OBITUARY: At Brussels, Ernil Louis Victor Laveleye, the Belgian political economist, aged sixty-nine.—At New iork, Backer Louis H. Meyer, n«ed sev»nty-six —At New Orleans, Michael J. sheehan.—At Salem, Mass., Colonel George Peabody. aged sixty-eight.—At Grand Rapids, Mich., General E'xsnezfcr, sprague. FOREIGN. FIRES AND CASUALTIES. THE main building of Converse college Spartanburg, S. C.. was burned Saturday night.. The loss is$60,000. THE works of the Atlanta Glass company burned Wednesday night at Atlauia Ga. Loss, $50,000; insurance, $40,000. A FIRE which broke out at Manford, Cat., Sunday, destroyed .$8,000 worin of property, caused the death of four persons, and badly injured six more. .j A snow slide-occurod •.Saturday at Sil- veton, Cal., and Miss Sadie Bliukson, who THERE are rumors Guatemala. of a revolution in .was promulgated CIIAKLKB Wwdnes- beard. He is of German parentage and never tried to learn English well, so that when ho speaks rapidly it is a difficult matter to understand him. lit bs^au to refine sugar ia a small way in California, and his rise in fortune dates from tho .time he was brought into association with lvaluku.ua. * * * Richard Mansfield will iu April go t* San Francisco from New York for a tour of the Pacific slope, which will last until the following July. Upon tho conclusion of his present tour he will go to England, where he will bo married to Mia<i Cameron, at the London residents of Clark, sister of the lute Rov. Waller Clark, who was Mr. Mansfield's preceptor at Uxi famous old Derby school, founded in I I'M. • * * The rbhostpf the new ueiiatonti* Feltou, of California, who ia said to havo one million to SUnford's three. Uo wa» u poor boy at the time of the discovery of wM \u and made bin money iu tub,* new tariff Tear's day. FRISCE FHKDEUICK GUSTAV •>fSaxe-Waluier-Basenach died day in Vienna. IT is reported that the doctors who are in attendance on the queen of Kounmhiu •lespalrof saving ht-r life. SIR GEORGE B. BID DELI, ARIY, ut one time British astronomer royal, died TUGH- •lay at London, aged 91 yeaxn. THE Suah of Persia Thursday, in response to popular demand, rescindoil all ooncesfions to tho tobacco monopoly, THREE persons wore killod und six severely injuiod by nu explosion in tho Monopol pit in Munster Thursday. IN Norway and Sweden and FiiihuiiJ tho .-ale of intoxiouting liquors at grotm und similar shops is probibiUii], THEIIE is u rebellion uiuong tLu iiiilivcii in the vicinity of Morocco, and Uritioh gunboats have betn disptttchoij t. 0 \\ w scouo. LORD SAi.ibHuuY denion having writ un nsrent to the Vatican in ordor in trout wilh the popo in rcgani to tho %yptia;i \ntir- urchy. IN closing tho UuriKurisvn Ubt Knnmrtir In-aticiB JoHiipJj guvo tuiiHiranen of wm- was snowshoeing on tho mountain side, was killed. AT Hamilton, the Wanzer Sewing Machine company's premises were d»m- aged^by fire Wednesdaw night to the extent of §100,000. The amount of insurance is unknown.. GILBERT WISNEU, of 6656 Michigan avenue, was walking on the Lalie 3h"oiv Railroad track at Sixty-seventh streat. last evening when he was struck by a train. He was taken to his home, where he died last night; •-.••...:• AN engine and a freight accommodation train on the New York, Outiirio & Western railroad, collided early Wednesday morning at Smyrna, Chenaugo county. Engineers Sheehan and Young were killed. Auother man is missing. _ FIUE in New York Tuesday morning in the fave-story building at tho comer o c Murray and Church streets caused an &"• grbgatti damage of $21,500, 'dUiributed UB «nn WS T-T P ;l(li " & ^ and Powder Companj, S500; United States Gkut Company, 91 000; L-Rogenthttl, 15,000; G. FI. Brow,i, ?l.j,(JUO. InflurancB unknown. '' CONGltESS. TUESDAY, Jan. 5. - SENATE,— The president to-day Bunt to the senaie the following nominal ions: In- tfir-phite commarc,? commissioners, Jauios W. MoDill, vico Thomas M. Coo oy, resigned ; William ]{. Mormon of Illinois (a reappointmwil); fourth iiHBintnnt-post- nmHtcr gonorul, J.^toH C. Ralhbono, of Ohio; William D. McCoy of Inuim.u. rtiHidont and consul gencr.sl to Lib.^iu: Win. U HCBH, Unitwl StaluB uon sul-Kcnerul at Co:iBt-intijni:ln; Andrew I'. McCormick of Toxa-, IJnir.od Htatos circuit jiidjuo for Ihe fifth judicial circuit; MidthowT, Allon, United SbitM altornoy for tho HOUI hern (JiHl.rict of California; Abraham J. He-ay, W uvornor of Oklahoma; J)amol JUy of Illinois, principal clprk of Uiu Biirvcyor gunoral'H land of- Ice; Duiiio 'J\ Hindwan, iifeunt for the Indiann of UinSiHwton ugonoy, South Dakota; (Jhi.if Engineer GIWM M. Molvillo, United HUtcKOfiKincer-iii-clncf und ohiof ot uio burwiu of Hluiiin rmgiwwing with this rolativo rank of wmimodoro; United HtaUiK coiiHiilH, (Jawj)ljoll L, M»xv»(i|| of Ohio, at Hurito Domingo, Gliurlos Wcaio directing the committee, on public lands to inquire whether public lands have been erroneously convened to any railroad company; by Bushnelf (Wis.), providing that nil silver dollars hereafter coined shall con- i ainone ounce troy pure silver, and for the fri>e coinage" thereof; br Jjse^h (N. M.)i for the admission of New Mexico as a state; br Halvorsen (Minn.)j to fix freight rates oa all ister- state railroads; by Lodge (Mass.), to regulate immigra-tion; by Post (III.), to reduce letter postage to one cent an ounce; bv Abner Taylor (III.), to establish a registered • parcel postase; also, to reduce registration charges; by Miller (Wis.), authorizing the secretary of the navy to use a sufficient number of vessels to convey to Russia nil cpnlributions made by citiz-.'os of the United States; by E-iloe (Tenn.), amending paragraph 199- schedule C of the tariff law, MJ «,<• to t rovkl.; ihiit lead ore< ami lead dros* shall |i iy a duty of % of n P.' n? per pound, premdnrl the rres containiug silver and lead in which lh« silver is of greater value, be consider cl silver ores and be admitted free of duly; by Newberry (III.) autuoriz- niK the secretaiy of war to detail for special duty in connection with the world's fair, such officer:) of the armv as are required for the purpose; hy Pickler, for free >.'dniission to the world's fair of all who served in the union army or navy dm ing the war; b.v Stewart requesting (he president to invite the government of Mexico to designate three commissioners to mtet a like number designated by the president ro np«o;iate a reciprocity treaty between the two countries. A nutabsr of execu tivo documents weru sent iu to the senate HTi'l refprrrd to appoinfmen 1 committees. SENATE.-—Among the petitions presented and referred were several from Oregon and Washington i» relation to the lands of the Northern Pacific Railroad companv several from the Illinois State Grange in favor of an income tax, and of n -oopnlar vote for the elestion of senators; 'of free mail delivery to farmeis; of improved wa'er wnyp; cf frae binder twine, and against dealing in options. Among the bilU introduced and referred were the following: By Mr. Peffer for the loan of money to the farmers of Indiana; by Mr. Cullon, to regulate commerce carried on by telegraph. The resolution offored by Mr. Morgan instructing tho committee on foreign relations f o in" quire into tho condition of tho canal, was amended by instructin committee to inquiie i.Uo what|amouiit of money has b«en actaally expended for nv purpofe. and what contracts or other ohli- gations havrt b^en made by the comp my. WOMAN'S LIFE. ItaHtiven From; the Cradle Grave. Of all the curiosities which the wise men of the Association for tic Advancement of Science took to Washington lor exhibition to their fellows, the most extraordinary was a meteorite with dia- oionds 'in it. Such a thing had never been seen or heard of bifore; in fact, it was the only specimen^ of the kind thus far discovered in the wor.'d The diamonds were little onef. but what they signified was big- The meteorite in question was one of many found recently in Arizona, near the Canon Diablo. I' was supposed by the discoverers that thry had hit •upon an iron mine of enormon- value, but investigation proved that the great chunks of metal picked up had been shot out of the realms of space. The place whence they were obtained is known as the •'Crater," becau.e it looks like one. being a circular hollow, 100 feet in depth, three- quarters of a mile wide, and mrroundid with n wall of rock so s;eep that (he bottom is strewn with the skeleton? of animals which have got in and and been un- able.to climb out again, Nevertheless, it is not of volcanic origin, as is proved with certainty by the fact that there is no lava, obsidian—volcanic glass—or other volcanic product in the neighborhood. What was if, then, that made the crater? Geologists say that it was formed by the impact of a pingje gigantic meteor, which at some time in the past struck the earth and buried itself out of sight, leaving a hole, which has siilce become partly filled up, surrounded by a wall of rock that was forced out of p'ace. Imaging what a big one it must have been to leave a cavity three fourths of a mile ii. width where it hit this vilauet. The huge mass of iron of which it was composed is there yet, of c. urse. Perhaps it is not sunk too deep ti render mining for its material unprofitable. Fragments of it formed the masses that, were picked up by the prospectors .ibove referred to. That one which contained the diamonds, however, has opened on absorbing subject for speculation. It proves that there are diamonds£in otber worlds than ours; but also it points to many other important conclusions. The diamonds of the famous Kimberly mines, which at present produce almost the entire world's snpr-ly of these gems, are all found at the bottoms of just such craters as the one described in.Arizoun. Jt'is beliered that these craters, so called, were'formed by the impact of great rneteora, because Ihere is no other conceivable way in which they could havs been made, aud frr other reasons aeologic il. If so, then it must be inferred that prob.bly all the diamonds of the.world were brought to this terrestrial sphere by the meteorites. Iu other words, thrse preeicu? jewels are not-native to the earth, but have beea fetched hither with the dust of oilier slurs. That accounts for the manner, hitherto deomtd unsccount able, in which thev are scatiwed everywhere through drifts of all sorts, having apparently no birthplace or definite relation to ether minerals. ^i Jtmay-be in the middle 6t the road aha the occasion one of serions eiigeacy; "ThFsj: particular black Mlows had promisedSto griid9 me to a nest of the~ 1 had never seen cne, and was very fluxion* to'do S<K On my journey mt companions seerrted incessantly to ba looking for something'to' eat. When oppor- Imty served they dimmed tall trees fot oyster^. The-rifce and full of the tides in Torres sfraits is pnoraoua, and the oysteri which are under waier when it is high,- jeing attached td tho trunks of tree?, tu-e left tcn'o'r twelve feel out of the watet when it as the lowest. 1 taw tw.o gigantic kangaroos on that trip, .and inea ured the leaps of one of them. Thirty-two feel the tape line showed for'»ach jump, taking it from toe mark to toe mark, ae the animal left them in the sand. It ig marvelous to see one of these great marsupials streaking across the cniutry in immense bounds,, literally throwing itself through (he air with its mighty hind limbs and hardly teeming to touch the earth in itj flight. The beast really? looka > as it it was flying, and I am not.HUrprised that Capt. Cook's, naturalist should have taken the firat kangaroo he saw for a big bird. '•On our way_ to find the nest, I came acroHS a beautiful speci oien of a rare kind of llzird. commonly called the 'flying dragon,' because it sometimes appears to fly, supporting itselMn the air to some extent aVdoes a flying squirrel. This one, which had an especially large and fine ruffle around its neck, crawled into hollow log to escape. I up-ended tho log, when it fell out, and I told one of the black fellows to pick it up. He did BO, and immediately carrying it to bis mouth, bitofi iU head. I was very angry to lose such a treasure in that way: but, when I scolded the man looked astonished, rubbed his stomach and said, 'Good, good.' Soon afterward may attention was called to a sort of 'Jack-in-in-the.pulpit' that grew in a liUle dell. Its leaves were somewhat withered, which fact was accounted for when auother of my aboriginal companions plucked the plant, up by t'ue roots and showed me, hanging from them, a bright green caterpillar, quite a foot in length. This latter he coojy held up by one end, dropped it down his throat, closed his eyes in an ecstacy of gustatcry appreciation and rubbed his stomach also. We reached the nest at last, and it was well worth seeing. It was a circular mound 8 feet high and- 22 feet in diameter. The birds begin the construction of such a one by getting together a big heap of leaves. On top of and around this heap they gather earth by tcralching it backward toward tne pile, and it was in this wav wholly that the great mound 1 describe was built up. All the surface soil had been scraped aw«y for a long distance around, for adding to the accumulation. When the birds have thus made their earth heap ready for the season's laying, they cut a cylindrical hole down into the middle of it. Into this they get one by one and lay their eggs. As soon as all are through they fill up the hole, leaving a cavity shaped like a wash basin on the top of the mound. Rains come, and the water retained ia this hollow filters through to the depoit of leaves, which are thus made to decompose. The heat of decomposition hatches the egg* and the youngfowls burrow their way out of the mound, not upward, but through the sides. It is a wise bird that knows its own mother, for the oarett bird gives no thought or care to their offspring after depositing their eggs. You can imagine what a vast amount of material is put into one of these nests when I fell you that a friend of mine in Australia "made his whole garden pa'.ch from one-half of one of these mounds.—Cincinnati Commercial- Gazette. THE WATCH. How the Point of the Compaq Mnj bo As- certnined by uny Waich. Same scientists go so far as to aesert that diamonds, like coal, which is so nearly of the same chemical constitution, !<> thu A woe mother is cnnfully putting her olici- favorite doll to bed. With' tender tudeshe carefully removes each daintv garment and fastenn on the tiny nightgown. Then, with u fond Kss, she liuus her treKBure to her und places it in its litllo criulle. After patting it genih- the , coudnot possibly come into existence without previous vegetable growths to generate their material. For this reason they infer that the fiading of the gems in the meteorite demonstrates that there must have bat n vegetable life, at all event* in the place whence the meteorite came' It there was vegetable life there, it is a fnr presumption that there was animal « a J 80 '. A " this ffoi-ds the first guess 1>e untrue, but it glimpse that has as tbo twilight tinned t -i(.'H. , of Iowa, at AJX l/i (Jhiipjiollo, David H. K. ul tiunnolioru, J'iliaB JJ Jln.npt.hin;, at Mututiiiiv. li, Loiiiniaiw, ut IMlw, A public of- Jiuck, Orison Now amJ Jii/ii(M bill pi;ilCO tho hiW ri<|jinli;iUiiJ the of j''rmic« for rciiariitifiii for Ido (;*ia'l'/u///( incident, and U/u r/uxt *\» v ;„ it,,, \ (l> \ lt , )V llO 1H UWUlluil V/ith i/lU:r»;U. baliovci-l Io bolhu li«A Hbtr ttii';t h'<*/nl- laud, which wiilurj irum Aiiiwivi, i'n-i,(l. for N(!W Ynrh. IT U oliiirittlly ijj'; f i^(j U,m, ^,,-j, \,,, Hiiil.l!«. K'liiK l/ut/tl- Inini u itlij, " ' ' : Guv i if. Hhot. linuM';lf liiillila Io rlilu o/i ;> Hc'.at/;;- Ht(;v/iut (Nnv.J uiJdml u ,|<!W Itwunt to tho (Hiv(;r«juh»lion lo-day (>y Ilic f>/o|",«iij';f, that UK; boldurn of Milvw bul- nun nri. culitloiJ u»iil{/r tin i-x'vMnu luw nwi >' rv.[,i-A\t'i[ to fur UH tint n-tuitor win ;iinwlal«, l/> Uiu f/i.uwiuugo of MJIvor. 'j'tn- " '""' l; '**'-bit (!O;ill;iitt(t(jOii jinjioj. if uny fvr'liut' W/xliiiioit in 1'i'y itfilii: tO II-WIVH Hill] Ull'lll l/i'l»:(l| Dt (l({|/o>lt'ti^ lipfcoos £out of the room poi-ps curiously in. . A fair niaidou stands before her look- ing-^liwH adding the last touches to her overling toilet. Her lover will soon be. '• Or i°, . c.',' r c ? yo ? nre ful! of innocent love- lig it-l bhu looks rtiig^i-ly at her reflection nluSrt 1 * Utm tflud , i ? he i9 tllllt 8he " pretty! She frowns a little at 'a crimp tlmt will not stay just as it should A ring coinuH at tho door and sho hastens away to meet hoc beloved. A young wife sita anxiously waiting for her husband, At oach approaching foot- sto|) hor heart bj.iU rapturously and thou grown hcuvjf with, disapointuiont! She will not, ^ uidpors, it in no wot outthore! t', ,.,. •-, ——•>-! •« *•« "w TTut uiiutiiurui ilio crocpiinr HlmdowH oliDor hertrombliuK 8oul-~so Him wails mill wishes, uml the HliaUowj lotigtliun into diuko.ied nil/lit-, A HipUior IH rocltunf her buby to n|eep Ho lookB ut hor tfruvuly whilo thuy mD vo to ami I ro, an if aHltin« why tho Hurin iiiio niuHi k.,i Vl ) uml (,!,„ own Judo Inir dour fnco fiom iw a wealth of window in hiu Jiyi-Ml ll» hol<ln tigliUy Io il to kiidj) her iiuur liim! Whou al hiHt Iii« o.yo» aro closwl ii i'!V'"T M l( Jving hiiud, IUHHOH iKliUy- ID muM, „„(. i,,, a W Hk.miMl--aim iirlicH to put, him into hi,, cr ib, Th,,,, " Mull* liuitli liiUi Inn- ulnii,. m ,,| I )()K J UH n;(:ki !W Hin. U in HO jiloiwiint to « LwlliKht, uml ho in HO HwauUo A woMiiin IdiiK-li by u froMli-nnvdi) univo HID hyiid boiir.1 H(HMJ.I coldly uL hor u,,,! bright iigoly nhad- hini. Tlioro H Brail sweet hor dres.-*, us H|IO ' a over bean obtained into the greatest prob- em that mankind has ever attempted to haudle— namely, the question whether life exists in other worlds than ours. Prom the philosophical point of view, the fact cannot be taken for granted in a universe in which the sun is merely : n inferior star of the fourth magnitude. Nevertheless some absolute evid»nce o., tho point would be extremely satisfactory, Meteorites ordinarily are nearly all iron with a small percentage of nickel. Nona of them have ever een known to contain e particle of any precious metal. Neverthe- ess, many of them ara worth muiy times thoir weights in gold, beeuue of some pecnluirity of structure or otherwiw Jivory collector • of minera.'s makes it a mailer of pride to have a specimen of oven- known kind of meteorite in his cab met. If a new sort turns up and he has not a piece, he is unhappy. It happens uot more aouietimoi that one u more •ban a pound, of a make-up that has not been t een before, will geltta bits for a thouiand dollan, if its possessor knows i --—;: .i u other worlds bec.iuse thev know nothing about the next oce f I no most mtereatiiig man amonsr the u.i,h 0 t, w i,o hiwo been visiting "" ' in WltH 111 II' H willow." With iiijniln down lownr, till Hill! Rlul lltld lit'lo/i it.yiii< limy uru f r j,, m | H ,,, UlAUho Wi'll'l« m .» .f,,, ul.o too, Am Iwlliul ill My . W«imil«lir,. wmv* to - —....„...„„,, i,u,u ueeu visilluB Wash. lUBlonH JVof Henry A. \7,.rd, th-great natural wicnco collector of R chesterf N i. I tiling spent his life iu traveling all pvcr tho world, for th- purpwo of £K »>B nnitorial for wusf mns. Tho luhvnt- urosholwH .mot with wbilo in pursuit of cunosiiioH in om» far comer of the earth or |iuot.li.>i- would fill many delichlful «?f° i " 00 »vovsa'iou the, other diiy, he ro'wwfl^o nu expedition he onceiunJe in ^''^!JV!i^"5^^«^ A few days ago I was standing by a gentleman, when I expressed a wish to know which point was the north. He at once pulled out his watch, looked at it, and pointed to the north. 1 asked him whether he had a compass attached to his watch. '•All watches," h« replied, are compasses " Then hu explained to me how this was. Point tho hour hand to the sun, and the south is exactly half way between the- hour and the figure XII on the watch. ior instance, suppon? that it is four o clock. Point tho hand indica'ing four t3 the .-un. and II on Ihn watch is exactly Bonth. Suppose that it is eight o'clock, point the uand indicating eight to the Bun, and the figure X on the watch is due south. My friend was quite surprised that I did not know this. Thinking that very possibly 1 was ignorant of a tbino- which every one else knew, and happening to meet Mr. Stanley, I asked that eminent traveler whether he was aware of Una simple mode of discoveiing Lh« points of the compass. He said that he had never heard of it. I presume, th-.refore that the world is in the same ,tate of ignorance AmaJfi is proud of having been the home of the mveaior of tie compass. I do not — 1^ tQWn b ° asU ° f m What EilDcat«*. You ask, what will educate your son lour daily example will educaie him' your conversation with your friends; the ouiiness he sees you fcrdnsact; the likings and disliking he sees vou expresa— the " will educate him; your situation io him. It is t'onvciucno-'g for tho I'liriioHiof lining their O f,'v.'». "It. was m iho imiiflilmrhdod of Port 'tin-win, on Torres Strait*," s «ul the, wo. lim? 1 '' ' 'V ul i 80 " 1 !, 1 n . lltivo ll ''i«k follows .,, ""!',. lllul 'I '"I- of bisiniils (o niiv thorn wt h. Diwuiui t,o with tliom for wuiS M wrii us rumu-y, b.'wiusu thoy ouvo for |"•«»««: in hfo hut .-uiimr. |'f you «ivo Mu'iij coiiiH t.||,, y oiu-ry thmn i» Uinir oiirs, « Hi tl«7 uro jiioro apt thun not, to J'I'ttlllM III, III), ' ' loll iiviu, (0 I ' luult in il euro '•"•" "'ilium, iu^««a^:5;tia i , when uot In UM). Uuo uiuvt mid uot lot Uioiu havo «liy - society you live in above all, your rank. ,„„. life, your table will educate „,„, „ ... not in your power to withdraw him from tbe continual influence of these thiniw ex*p; you were to withdraw yourself from them also. Ehuutiou ^oes on ts turn its course. Wh.=t these have a tendency to make your ih Id, that will he be. l arents should invariu'olv give eaod ex- amp e< to their children, for youths are usually apt student*, and impressions made iu childhood fod-libly stamped oa tho susceptible miml. -Selected. Tttkeu fuj n i n.ufcT A ««ml-fl*nill»h delight often swree io w*»k onet. The irritability of the nerrous hypo- chonUrUo It tiilonled u n»mra) 111 temper. T!>» »ery genulu* uxd dlBtwsslng .ymplom* bom

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