The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on February 4, 1891 · Page 5
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 5

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Wednesday, February 4, 1891
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THE DEB ALeONA, IOWA, WEDNESDAY, FEBKTJAHY 4, 1891. CREAMERY, fHE fROFlfS OF WINTER DAIRYING COME IN. John Gould Sftyg Winter Dairying Ig Practicable to the Progressive Farmer but It Cannoi Be Carried On by Old time MethocH—It Pays Well. Whiter dairying is practicable to those Who will put themselves in the line o: t>fogressive dairy thought, but it cattno be carried on tvith old time methods "The failure of cows to breed at the proper time" is not the greatest obstacle to overcome in winter dairying. First the barn, the stable, the water, the feed and the cow each have to be consider ed and made to harmonize with th< "changed season." The winter care o: the milking dairy is an artificial creation, as compared with the usual sum ,mer keep. There must be a warm stabli —not allowed to approach the freezing temperature. It must be kept at leas 20 degs. above. Light in this stabl should be abundant, and sunshine fal as much as porsible within its walls. There should be an abundant supply water at command in the barn, si !hat the cows can bo watered there without much labor. This is cheaply provided for with a thirty barrel gal vanized iron tank, with close cover standing in the stable near the cows supplied from a well or spring. Thei the water is supplied to the cows at uniform temperature of BO degs. with out heaters or pipes. The winter food most conducive to abundant milk flow is cheaply provided for by the use of the silo and bran, with a luncheon of'clover hay. Six tons of silage for each cow will abundantly feed her from Novem "ber to May 20; mill feed at $12 per ton will supply the food for a milch cow for ten cents per day. I have done even { Jtter than this. Hay to exceed three pounds per day to each cow is notneedec in the winter dairy. The winter dairy, rightly managed, is profitable because the prices for dairy produce are much better from September to Juno than from April to Nov. 15, which is about the limit of milk giving for the summer dairy. Tho milking period of the October calving cow is fully sixty days longer than that of the spring milker. There is little difficulty in kfSping the October milkers in profit- ableftinilk giving nine months, often mor 1 and the men with silos and wintei daii ->j| show the figures that their cows give ^ully one-fourth more milk in the samt number of days than will the same dairy milked in summer, and the balance of the milk obtained in the longer milking period is clear gain. The dairy that gives $45 worth of milk in summer gives $05 winter milked. The question of cheap winter feeding is being rapidly settled with many, Others are now fully of the opinion that the winter milker can be kept as cheaply with shorts and silage as the dry cow can be on hay and the ordinary plan of kefjrj. .One of the most successful dairymen of New York, who keeps his dairy on silage the year round, puts the cost at: grain, $35; silage, $12; average income of each cow, $75. An acre of good silage more than keeps a cow one year; this is a result that scores of other farmers testify to and with as good success. The advantages of winter dairying aside from all this in the way of paying markets, cheaper labor, more uniform care of the cows and other matters need no elaboration here. To the man who has a well cared for winter dairy these matters are self evident.—John Gould in American Agriculturist. I.lnio and Sulphur Flavors. The small quantity of lime in common barrel salt condemns it for dairy use because of the soaponic effect on butter, and the writer has held June butter in the granulated form until he thought he could detect the fumes of sulphur gases. To test water for sulphur make a strong brine and add one-fourth buttermilk, and bottle tight and examine at the end of four months. . If when distilled or rain water is used these sulphurous gases still rise, then it must be generated from the milk and ealt. I visited two creameries last season where I could smell the sulphur in the water as it left tho pump. Was it caused by imperfect drainage from the creamery or from minerals in the earth? It is needless to say that the held butter from those creameries sold at low figures. The question is asked: "What causes the greasy, soapy flavor in butter? It was not so in past years," Is it not twice churned cream, fluted butter workers and limey water and limey salt that produce these results?—A. M. Bingham in Creamery Journal. moor for Dairy House. I am building a dairy house and should like your advice as to the best floor to put in.—W. B, Answer.—Tho floor of the dairy should be of such material as will not absorb moisture. The best floor is made of smooth flagstones laid in cement. Then conies hard pressed and burned brick laid in cement and, third, a good cement floor. Next is a •well seasoned hardwood floor and then a good pine floor. Wooden floors should be made of narrow boards well filled with varnish or oil. All floors should be laid with a fall of a quarter of an inch to the foot toward the drain.—Field and Farm. Dairy Products. Daily products have reached prices that ought to bo satisfactory to producers of fancy goods, and it is improbable that prices will go much higher. The increasing practice of winter dairying and the preference of consumers for fresh made butter tend to larger supplies of and better prices for the latter. There will be a continued good demand and fair prices for the best butter and cheese. —Rural New Yorker. Professor JJoberts in ft late agricultural bulletin says he received no return in milk and butter from feeding gram rations to cows on good pasture. they ConMn't See tt»e rfoko. Three members of the Episcopal congress sat in ft coftter of the Lafayette writing t ooin talking over some important subject. All were men ranging from 50 to 65 years, all were dressed in black, and the face of each, wore a look oi intense interest. Those who noticed these gentlemen were aware that they were discussing some important church question, and nobody heard what they said but one young man who appeared to have fallen asleep in a chair near by. As he half opened his eyes the western bishop gravely said: "Gentlemen, I wish to ask a question." The others drew nearer as the bishop, carefully adjusting his spectacles, continued: "Gentlemen, whyis grim death like a tin can tied to a dog's tail?" A silence ensued. The two clergymen thus addressed mused for a while and then shook their heads. "Give it up," they said. A grim smile spread over the bishop's face as he added, "Grim death is like a tin can tied to a dog's tail because it's bound to a pup." Then he burst into a roar of laughter, and the others made feeble efforts to join him and appreciate tho joke. Late that evening the three met again in the Lafayette corridor, and the bishop, a little embarrassed, .said: "Gentlemen, I told that story wrong this afternoon. What I really meant was this: Grim death ia like a tin can tied to a dog's tail because it's bound to occur—not to a pup." The others laughed this trip.—Philadelphia Press. As Others See Us. A funny story is told at the expense of Sir Richard Moon, chairman of the board of directors of tho London and Northwestern Railway company. Sir Richard is one of the most energetic railway magnates known, and is the terror of tho employes of the company, for they never know when he is about to pounce upon them. He makes a point of visiting every station on the line at least once a year, and has an odd habit of overhauling the books and accounts of station masters at inconvenient times. He knows the price of everything, and is said to have rowed an unfortunate freight agent for giving too much for a packet of carpet tacks.' One day he dropped in at Crewe station about 5 a. m. and saw a couple of porters hard at work cleaning up things generally. Sir Richard was delighted. "This is the right way, men," he exclaimed. "Hike to see such painstaking industry begun so bright and early in the morning." "Industry be blowedl" said the man addressed tartly, who of course did not know who the fussy old gentleman was. ' "We don't commence work at this unearthly hour, but we've just heard that old nuisance, Moon, is on the roa.d somewhere and we're getting ready in case the old hunks should drop in on us unexpected." In justice to Sir Richard be it said he took no notice of the opprobrious remarks, but quietly slipped away and gave the men the go-by that time.— Philadelphia Inquirer. Ho Had a Wife ut Homo. "I have a little Bible at home," said the bad man, "that in 1868 I wrested from a Sunday school class of nineteen. I haven't opened it since, and it is as new and clean as the day I got it." "Bring it down somo day; I'd like to see it," said his friend carelessly. The next day the bad man came into his friend's office, and, throwing a little, half wornout book on the desk, he said: "There she is, old man, but I was a little wrong about its condition." "I should say BO," said the other; "how does it happen that this little book is so badly worn, when you thought it was clean and all right at home?" "Well," said the bad man, and his voice was a bit husky, "the truth of the matter is I've got a little wife up at the house and a couple of young ones. They sometimes rummage through my things." —Frank Leslie's. Presentation to a Canine Hero. At a public meeting in Morecambe a handsome collar, bearing a suitable inscription, was presented to a dog for saving the life of a child. The dog, a fine specimen of an Airedale terrier, the property of Cab Inspector Lamb, was accompanying two young men on a walk in the country, when by its excited manner and actions it attracted their attention to a large dike. In the bottom of this they found the body of a child about 8 years old, lying face downward in the mud, there being only a few inches' depth of water at the time. On being extricated the child was found to be almost suffocated and was with difficulty restored. The dog has on other occasions given evidence of unusual sagacity.—London Tit-Bits. A Barefoot Rothschild. Tho spectacle of one of the rich Roths- ihilds going daily barefooted can be witnessed in the village of Waereshofen, near Munich. But the sight of great people going in their bare feet in that town is so common as to excite little remark. It is one of the requirements of Father Kneip, the nerve doctor, of his patients. They are also required to take i morning plunge in ice cold water and eschew all meat and intoxicating drinks, but they are particularly required to run barefooted.—Paris Letter. THE HEWS OF THE COUNTY jportiftftd. , Jan. 80.—The oyster supper at Hie new church brought out the largest crowd of the season. It was estimated that 175 persons took supper, netting the society ?80.80. We were pleased to shake hands with so many of our Burt friends, as well as many others we do not often see. The Little Girls' society had a candy and popcorn stand from which they made $4.TO. This, with what they had on hand, paid for two large hanging lamps for the church. Pretty good for small folks. It was so late when supper was over they carried out only part of the programme prepared for the evening. ..The young people enjoy the socials so well, the Indies have decided to have them once in two weeks, instead of the usual Mite societies. The next social will be at Mr. Giles* two weeks from Friday night, Feb. 13. A meeting for the purpose of organizing a farmers' alliance is to be hold at the Fox school house, on Saturday evening of this week. Mrs. Jesse Davison planned to surprise her Inisiand by inviting about twenty of their relatives and friends to tnko dinner with him last Monday, it being his forty- eighth birthday. Their friends in turn surprised both Mr. and Mrs. Davison by bringing in a chair just as dinner was reacfy and placing it at the head of the table for M . Davison to occupy. Mr. Bacon presented the chair with appropriate remarks, and all sat down to a bountiful repast. Ben. Reed of Algonn, by the merest accident, appeared just in time to help discuss the dinner in appropriate style. Mrs. Jesse M. Smith and two children have gone to Ohio to spend the rest of tho winter with her parents. Frank Paine will commence selling Dr. Ward's medicine next week in Humboldt county. Mina Millis will soon start in the same business in Wright county. T.iUVorne. LuVEitxu, Feb. 2.—Leroy Barton shipped one carload of hogs and ono of cattlo this week. Goo. Warling shipped three cars of hogs Saturday night. Johnny Robertson went to Chicago with them. This morning as Mr. Wm. Brummond was standing at the depot waiting to take the train for Minneapolis, a telegram came with the news that his father was dead. The deceased was 73 years old and an old settler on the Boone river, being one of the flrst to settle there over twenty years ago. He was a native of Germany, but came to this country about thirty years ago. He was a thrifty farmer and a kind father, and leaves a large family to mourn his loss. He died at the old homestead, and was buried at the cemetery east of Corwith. Quite a lively time in town today. Jumping, boxing, a drunk and a "scrap" was the result of the day. Mr. 'Kiah Turner's little boy, 3>£ years old, is very sick with spinal fever at pros ent, but tho doctor still has hopes of his recovery. H. Parks and J. Clarke went to Livermore this evening on business. Quite a snow storm today. It will soon be ground hog day. Look out for weather then. D. W. Ramm has over 250 hogs packed to date, and still at it. Dave will be able to supply the state with smoked and salted meats if ho keeps on. Mr. Wm, Godfrey's mother is very sick at this writing, and is not expected to recover., Simmons & Crosswait have closed up their meat market for a while. Frank Hill and Joe Spitz went to Corwith last Monday on business. Business is quiet these days. A little child of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Sorenson died the 28th, and was buried at the cemetery here today. J. A. Duitman of Goldfleld was in town on Monday last. Sliver Smith of Goldfield was in town last Sunday to see his best girl, Muscular Power of Insects. The muscular power of some insects is simply enormous. A French entomologist had a pet beetle that could lift 850 times his own weight. If the human species were as strong in comparison a urge sized man could lift a freight engine from, the track and carry it 200 Tiiles between sun up and sun down.— &t. Louis Republic. The London Clearing Rouse. , The daily average at the London clearing house for 1888 amounted to £22,250,000. If these transactions for a single day were settled in coin it would •equire 175 tons of gold or 3,781 tons of silver, while probably the documents actually used did not weigh more than iwdredweight-T-GfoBtleman's Iftaga- gine. Bancroft. BANCROFT, Feb. 1.—Died, Luther Bing- nam, at the ago of 55 years. The cause of his death was a complication of diseases, of which heart disease was tho chief. The de- j ceased was a former resident of Montour, Iowa, where he was postmaster and a prominent member of the M. E. church, Ho came to this place last fall, and has shown himself a good citizen and a much respected man. The diseases which caused his death were contracted in the army, as he was a faithful follower of the flag. He will be buried from the M. E, church today with Masonic honors, to which lodge ho belonged. Peace to his ashes. ' H. W. and D. E. Smith returned from Ellsworth college last Saturday. Tho revival meetings at the M. E. church have closed. They have done the community much good. It is reported that a son of S. P, Haglund was lost in the storm last Thursday night. At the I. O. G. T. election last Saturday night tho following officers were elected: W. C., J. B. Streater; V.T,,Lutie Wallace; W. Ch,, J. W. Case; W. S., James Patterson; W, F. S., J. A. Freeh; S. J. T., Mrs. T, M. Ostrander; W. M., James Coleman; W. T., Lela Gray; W. G., Mamie Wilson; W. Sent, Geo. A. Smith; A. W. L. D., E. E. Gray. The Good Templars' lodge.is in a prosperous condition, there being about ninety active members, and it is also on a good financial basis, Nathan Hawkes, a former resident of this place, was iu town on business last week and this. Miss Hilda Stinson was homo from the Normal over Sunday. We are to have an entertainment by the pupils of the school soon. So we hear the birds say. Thomas Welch, who lives north of town, has sold his farm and talks of moving to town. Peter Ferdinandson and Miss Ellen Coffeu were married atH, H. McChane's residence on Friday last, by Rev. Ward of this place. They have gone to Chicago to spend their honeymoon. We wish them a long and happy life. A ten-year-old son of Thos. Dottson died last week; we did not learu the cause. The funeral services were held in the Bronson school house last Friday. The sympathy of the neighborhood is with the family. A child of Mr. Hewitt is reported as being very ill. John Duckmanton is building an ice house and H. W. Roba is hauling lumber for a new residence, and so Bancroft is booming merrily along. Just Xvait till spring and wo will show you something in the lino of booms that's new. The light fantastic to^Jnvns tripped at Judge Cook's farm on Wednesday night, and some of our boys went to Fenton Friday night to the masquerade. We hear that E. J. Fuller is at Bloomfield, Nebraska, clerking in a store. His many friends hero will be glad to hear that he is prospering, •\Veslev. WESLEY, Feb. 8.—Winter has at last come with an abundance of " the beautiful," and the northwest wind is blowing gentle zephyrs which make everybody think that spring is not hero yet. But let it come; there is nothing that makes people fool so good as a good, snug winter with lots of snow. Monday was ground hop: day, and according to tho old tradition tho old fellow saw his shadow if ho picked up courage enough to crawl out, and no doubt ho did, for what else can you lay this storm to? The question is going through the minds of many of our citizens what tho wor.'ri is going to come to. Every day brings something new. While a few of our inhabitants were discussing the probabilities of tho ground hog seeing his shadow, some wish ing ho would, and others hoping ho would not, one of tho number wrote out a petition, addressing the same to Obed Robinson, our justice of tho peace, praying him to remain in all day—not to come out and see his shadow; if he did wo would have six weeks more of winter. Tho petition was signed by twenty or more of our citizens, some of them loading business men of our town. Now the question is, what do these men mean? Do they intend to say by that petition that our honorable court is iv woodchuck, or do they mean to intimate that he looks like ono? Wo would like to know. If we were in Obed's place and any of those fellows ever came to our office to get married, wo would demand our fee in advance; also take tho liberty of kissing tho bride bo- fore wo pronounced them man and wife; and if we held any notes against them, we would force collection at onco. Yes, we will say, in the language of J. H. Ford, ono of Wesley's old pioneers, "Wo would make them chaps smell the patchen." F. M. Butts and J. H. Wnrd have purchased some lots in Chicago and intend to build a hay barn on them to store hay in. Mr. Butts is talking strongly of going to Chicago to give the hay business his entire attention, . The east bound freight last Saturday night got stuck in the snow near Wesley, and it took nearly all day Sunday to got things straightened up so they could get away. Some of our Wesley school ma'ams who were spending Sunday at home with their friends, had a i-ather cool rido Monday morning going back to their schools. Markets: wheat, SOc: oats, 86c; barley, 50c; corn, 35c; flax, S1.05; timothy, 61; hay, $3.50@$5.50; butter, 13c; eggs, SOc. THE OOUHTY BOAED. They Wet In Adjourned Session on Monday of Tills Week. The supervisors held their adjourned session on Monday and Tuesday. Among' the business transacted which the public will want to know about, they ordered the Mann bridge to be half planked. G. H. Peters was made a committee to buy two carloads of piling for county bridges. E. S. Salisbury was appointed deputy auditor, and G. A. Brunson deputy clerk. Horace Mann, who is going away, sent in his resignation as county surveyor, and the board appointed C. B. Hutchins in his stead. Tho auditor was instructed to notify the auditor of Story county to send Mrs. Carmody and children back to this county, and S. Benjamin will take them to the poor farm when they arrive. The county was divided into five districts for the purpose of rendering medical attendance to the poor, and physicians were appointed to attend them. The board passed a resolution to the effect that the court house be used for county purposes only on and after Jan. 1, 1892. This gives nearly a year for out- people to prepare some other place in which to hold our dramatic and other entertainments. The board audited a few bills, and adjourned yesterday. Would Sue Doles for Slander. The LeMars Sentinel humorously suggests, after a talk with a shrewd old farmer, that Gov, Boies be sued for damages for slandering Iowa in his New York speech. The farmer said, "He ought to pay the damage. The farmers joined together and lawed it with the barbed wire monopoly and the drive well patentees, and they won their case, too. Why not join together now and make Boies pay for the damage he has done us? H the capitalists do not know or find out that the old man lied in his speech in New York, it will damage Iowa farmers more than the barbed wire monopoly or the drive well swindles." A Wonder Worker. Mr. Frank Huffman, ayoungmauof Burlington, Ohio, states that he had been under the care of two prominent physicians and used their treatment until he was not able to get around. They pronounced Ills ease consumption itnd Incurabe. He was persuaded to try Dr. King's New Discovery for Consumption, Coughs and Colds, and at that time wits not able to walk across the street without resting. He found, before lie bud used half of a dollar bottle, that he was much better; he continued to use It and Is today enjoying good health. If you have any throat, lung, or chest trouble, try It. We guarantee satisfaction. Trial bottle free at L. A. Sheetz'. 5 Electric Bitters. This remedy Is becoming so well known and so popular us to need no special mention. All who have used Electric Bitter* sing the same song of praise. A purer medicine does not exlstrund it Is guaranteed to do all that Is clulmed. Electric Bitters will cure all diseases of the liver and kidneys, will remove pimples, bolls, salt rheum, and other affections caused by impure blood. Will drive malaria from the system and prevent as well as cure all malarial fevers. For cure of headache, constipation, and Indigestion try Electric Bitters; entire satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded, Price, 500 and f 1 u bottle, ut L. A. Sbeetz 1 drug store. ' 6 JJucklen's Arnica Salve, The best salve in the world (or cuts, bruises, sores, ulcers, salt rheum, fever sores, tetter, chll- Waina, chapped hands, corns, and all akin eruptions, and positively cures piles, or no pay Is required. It Is guaranteed to give .perfect sutlafac- fiou, or money refunded. Price 25 cents per box,' Sola by Dr. Sheet?, druggist, Algona. TOPICS OP THE TIME. How n Printer Was Cnrctl of a Conph. I have a cousin who Is a printer, says Ex- Mayor J. B. Loughran of North Des Molncs, Iowa. Some years ago ho was employed in this city where they were printing circulars tor Chamberlain. He had a deep seated cold and terrible cough, and while setting up copy he made up his mind to buy a bottle. It cured him and that was the first I ever know of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy. I have been strongly In its favor ever since. My own experience and that of my family convinces mo that this remedy Is the best in the world. That, may bo strong language but that is what I think. For sale by F. W. Dingley. True Merit is Apprcrlntril. Several years ago Chamberlain & Co., of Des Moliics, Iowa, commenced tho manufacture of cough syrup, believing it to bo tho most prompt and reliable preparation yet produced for coughs, colds and croup; that tho public appreciate true merit, and iu time It was cor tain to become popular. Their most sanguine hopes have been more than realized. Over three hundred thousand bottles of Chamber- Iain's Cough Remedy arc now sold each year, and it is recognized as " tho best made," where over known. It will cure a severe cold in loss time than any other treatment. For sale by F. W. Dingley. _ There Is No of a cold resulting in pneumonia when Chamberlain's Cough Remedy is used us directed " for a severe cold." It effectually counteracts and arrests any teudenco of a cold to result in pneumonia. This fact was fully proven in thousands of cases during the epidemic of influenza last winter, For sale by F. W. Dlngloy. l"or tho Marti I Grits. to be bold at Now Orleans, special round trip tickets will bo sold by tho Milwaukee & St. Paul company, Fob. 3 to 8 inclusive, for ijxiO., Corn. I am paying tho highest market price for corn, on ruy farm a mile cast of Algona.-83 C, L. LUND. English Spavin Liniment Removes all hard, soft, or calloused lumps or blemishes from horses, blood spavin, curbs, splints, sweoney, ring bone, stifles, sprains, all swollen throats, etc. Save $i>0 by use of 0110 bottle; warranted. Tho most wonderful blemish cure ever known. Sold by Dr. Sheet?.. Itch cured in !)0 minutes by Wolford's Sani tary Lotion. Sold by Dr. Sheete. M ONEY FURNISHED— AT SEVEN PER CENT. INTEREST. At Kossuth County Bank. Apply at oiico. NOTICE OF FINAL REPORT. in tho matter of tho estate of Olo O. Uakkcn & Son, deceased. To all the heirs or creditors of the above named estate: You are hereby notified that on or before tho 28th day of February, 1801, said administrator will iilo with tho clerk of the district court of Kossuth county, Iowa, his final report and ask to be discharged: and you are further notified that all objections thereto must be tiled with said clerk 011 or before tho llrst day of said term of said court which will convene and be holdon at Algona, in Kossuth county, Iowa, on tho iid day of March, 1801, or said report will be approved and said administrator discharged and his bonds released. AVM. CLEABY, 4Gt:j Administrator, NOTICE OF FINAL REPORT. In the matter of the estate of John Raney, deceased. To all the heirs and creditors of tho above named estate: You are hereby notified that on or before tho first day of March, 1801, said administrator will illo with the clerk of tho district court of Kossuth county, Iowa, his final report, and ask to be discharged; and you are further notified that all objections thereto must be filed with said clerk on or before the first day of said term of said court which will convene and be holden at Algona, in Kossuth county, Iowa, on the 2d day of March, 1801, or said report will be approved, and said administrator dismissed and his bonds released. W. H. KAN13Y, 45t3 Administrator. NOTICE, IN THE DISTRICT COURT, STATE OF Iowa, in and for Kossuth county.—In tho matter of tho application of L. A. Sheotz, a registered pharmacist, for a permit to buy, keep, and sell intoxicating liquors.—March term, 1801. To whom it may concern: Notice is hereby given that the application of tho undersigned, L. A. Sheetz, a registered pharmacist, No. 240, doing business under the linn name of L. A. Sheetz, of the city of Algona, in tho county of Kossuth, and state of Iowa, praying for a permit to buy, keep, and sell intoxicating liquor in his brick store on the corner of State and Thorington streets, in said city of Algona, be on illo in the office of the cleric of tho disti... court of said county, on or before the 20th day of February, 1801, and that said causo will come on for hearing in said court at the March term of said court, to be begun and hold at Algona, Iowa, on the 2d day of March, 1801. L. A. SHEETZ, 45 Applicant. 9MIIIIIMKI a yenr is belnp tnndd by John ft. (iuudvvlii/rruy.N.V.^it wurk fur ua. Header, yuu mny not iiinke IIH niucli, hut we cun tenth yim quickly how to t-iim from 105 to ^10 it tiny ut llif fltHM, nnU inoiti tin you go on. Itulh fcrxtiN, nil ni,'t>ii. In any part of |i\mvrlcu, yon cmi coimuunce nt home, glv- 'ftiK all your tlimv-r »|':iru motm-ntu only to lliu worl(. All In iimv. Uruiit pay bliltK for {•wry worker. We hliirt you, furnishing en'ryllihiB. KA8II.Y, Sl'KliDII.Y leal-nod. I'Altl'lfULAUS fllKK. AUdrins ut once, S'H.VSOK /.• CO., l'UKTI,AM), B1AIM!, ORIGINAL NOTICE. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE of Iowa, in and for Kossuth County—March Term, A. D. 1801.—A. J. Jones vs. Horace Shackelford and E. Spilman. To said defendants: You are hereby notified that the petition of the plaintiff in the above entitled causo is filed iu the office of the clerk of the district court of the state of Iowa in and for Kossuth county, claiming of you that he is the absolute owner of the east half of the . northeast quarter of Section Four, Township I Ninety-four, Range Twenty-nine, west of the 5th P. M., Iowa, and asking that his title thereto be quieted in him: and that unless you appear thereto and defend before noon of tho second day of the March term, A. D. 1801, of the said court, which will commence at Algona on the 2d pay of Match, 1801, default will be entered against you and judgment rendered thereon. GEO. E. CLARKE, 43tl Attorney for Plaintiff. NOTICE OF INCORPORATION Of THE Whittemore Co-Operative Dreamery Notice is hereby given that the above-named company has organized and commenced doing business under the name and style of " The Whittemore Co-Operative Creamery Company." Tho principal place of transacting business will be Whittemore, Kossuth county. Iowa. The general nature of the business to be transacted Is to collect and manufacture into butter and cheese tuo milk belonging to subscribers to its capital stock, and to purchase nnrt manufacture milk, cream, and other dairy productR, and to sell tho same, and to do all things necessary to make the aforesaid business ii success. The amount of capital stock authorized by this corporation is Six Thousand Dollars, ($0,000), which Is divided into shares of Fifty (*r»0) Dollars each; Three Thousand (J.1,000) of which is paid up, and the certificates for tho remainder of said authorized capital stock shall be issued \ipon resolution passed by the board of dlv?"lnrs, and shall be sold at such time and iu such manner as may bo determined by snld board. Tho time of commencement of this corporation was Jan. 21, 1801, and It shall continue twenty years, unless sooner dissolved by the stockholders representing three-fourths of the stock voting tor such dissolution. The affairs of the corporation nvo to bo conducted by a board of five directors, who shall bo elected by and from among the stockholders at tho annual mootliiK, which mooting will bo on the llrst. Saturday' In January in each year, and tho ofllcura of this corporation shall bo a prosldont, vlro-proBldont, treasurer, and secretary, and such other officers as the board shall deem r.eccssnr.v, and as shall bo elected by tho board. All c>rtlcrr« shall bo elected at tho January mooting in each year. Tho highest, anunii:'. of Indebtedness to which this corporation can subject Itself ii! not to exceed two-thirds of Its paid-up capital stock. All private property of tho .stockholders is to be exempt from corporate debts, Witness our hands this 2!2d day of January, A. D. 1801. H. A. LlI.LtBHlDOE, J. O. JUWSON, J. B. WOUDKN, J. L. COTTON, llKNUY KlJNOHIilIOF&K, •H Incorporiilors of said Incorporation. NOTICE OF INCORPORATION oi' TUB Seneca Go-Operative Creamery Co. Notice is hereby given that tho above-named company has organized and commenced doing business under the name and stylo of " The Soueca Co-Operativo Creamery Company." The principal place of transacting business will bo Seneca, KosHiith county, Iowa. Tho general nature of tho business to bo transacted Is to collect and manufacture iuio butter and cheese the milk belonging to subscribers to its capital stock, and to purchase and manufacture milk, cream, and other dairy products, and to sell the same, and to do all things necessary to make tho aforesaid business a SUCCOHB. The amount of capital stock authorized by this coloration is Six Thousand Dollars, (8*0,000), which is divided into shares of Fifty ($50) Dollars each! Three Thousand ($!),000) of which is paid up, and the certificates for tho remainder of said authorized capital stock shall bo issued upon resolution passed by tho •• board of directors, and shall bo sold at such time and In such manner as may be determined by said board. Tho tlmo of commeiicemout of this corporation was Jau. 10, 1801, and it shall continue twenty veal's, unless sooner dissolved by tho stockholders representing three-fourths of the' stock voting for such dissolution. The affairs of tho corporation are to be conducted by a board of seven directors, who shall be elected by and from among tho stockholders at the annual meeting, which mooting will bo on tho llrst Saturday in January in each year, and the ofllcers of this corporation shall bo a president, vice-president, treasurer, and secretary, and such other officers as tho board shall deem necessary, and as shall bo elected by tho board. All ofllcers shall be elected at the January meeting in each year. ! Tho highest amount of indebtedness to which ! ' this corporation can subject itself Is not to exceed one-half of its paid-up capital stock. All private property of the stockholders Is to be exempt from corporate debts. Witness our hands this 10th day of January, A. D. 1801. JAB. B. CAUH, C. 0. FISH, WM. OUMISTON, ALDMHT JACOBSON, GEO. D. FTJLLEK, WM. KLEIN, P. W. JENSON, W. W. AI.COHN, J 48 Incorporators'of said Incorporation. ' K JDP'S GERM EHAIHOATOJt" POSI- tively cures all disease;; .tocause it kills all germs, bacteria, parasite:., microbes, and animalculuB in the system, which the promt neut physicians In convention agreed was tho cause of all disease. The air, water, vegetables and fruit are full of these little worms, oausing catarrh, consumption, diabetes, and Bright's disease, cancers, tumors, and all so called incurable diseases. (Never known to fail to cure consumption, catarrh, kidiioy troubles and syphilis.) Retailed In $2, $(), and $5 sizes, sent anywhere on receipt of price. This is the only genuine article; all others are dangerous counterfeits. Dr. Sheetz Issues guarantees to cure all ailments for Kldd's Germ Eradicator for the manufacturers. Snug little ruriimcilmvcbecnmadoat work for u«, by Anna PHBO, Austin, .Texai, unit Jno. llonn, Toluuo, Ohio. [See cut. Othei'tt are doing nit well. Wliy 1 lot you? Some rum over *50U.OU a nontli. You cmi do tho work And live ,t home, wherever you uro. Even be* :lnner» are easily earning from $6 io ,'10adoy.AUiffcc. Wetuowyoubow ana itart you. Can work In itmro tlmo . or all the Iline. Big nioney for worker}. Failure unknown among tboui. ' NEW and wonderful. 1'artluulari Int. M ONEY TO LOAN- ON BAIL80AD LANDS. Persons wanting to borrow money on railroad lands will do well to call at the Kossuth County Bank und bring their contracts. ORIGINAL NOTICE. STATE OF IOWA, KOSSUTH '. COUNTY.— District Court, March Term, 1800.—Minerva. Hall, Husted flail, Elnora Fauts, Thomas' Hall, Kosa Eggleston, Chas, Hall, John Hall, Cora Hall, Bert Hall, Emma Pyle, and J. Pyle, heirs at law of Wesley Hall, deceased, plaintiffs vs. Mary Aleaso, Geo. Willetts, and the Cllpperly, Hoover & Co., defendants. To said defendants: You are hereby notified that tho supplemental petition of plaintiffs in tho above entitled causo is now on file in thei office of tJio clerk of the district court of the state of Iowa, In and for Kossuth county, claiming they are the absolute owners of the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of Section No. 1)4, Township No. 100, Range No. 28, west of the 5th P. M. Iowa, and asking that tho title thereto bo quited in them. Ana that "'iloss you appear thereto and defend before jon of the second day of tho March term, A. jj. 1801, of the said court, which will commence at Algona on the 2d day of March, A. D, 1801, default will bo entered against you and, judgment rendered thereon. G1SO. E. CLARKE, 44W • Plaintiff's Attorney, ORIGINAL NOTICE. STATE OF IOWA, KOSSUTH COUNTY.— District Court, March Term, 1801.—W. W. Lynn, plaintiff, vs. James W. Lyon, John H. Lypn, Betsey A. Lyon, Chas. W. Lyon, Levl P. Lyou, and Augustus Lyon, heirs at law of Bradley Lyon, deceased, defendants. To said defendants; You are hereby notified that tho petition of plaintiff in the above entitled cause is now tiled In tho office of the clerk of the district court of the state of Iowa, in and for Kossuth county, claiming of you that he is tho absolute and unqualified ownor of the west half of the northwest quarter, and the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter, all in Section No. 23, Township No. 100, Range No. 28 west of tho nth P. M. Iowa, and asking that his title thereto be quieted, and that defendants be required to convoy to him the legal title thereto, and that a commissioner be appointed to execute such conveyance. And that unless you appear thereto and defend before noon of tho second day of the March term, A. D. 1801, of the said court, which will commence at Algona on the 2d day of March A. D. 1801, default will be entered against you and judgment rendered thoreon. GEO. E, OLARKE, Plaintiffs Attorney. ORIGINAL NOTICE. STATE OF IOWA, KOSSUTH COUNTY.— District Court, March Term, 1801.— E. D. Loathormau, plaintiff, vs. H. A, Lutta, de fondant. To said defendant; You are hereby notified that the petition of plaintiff in the above entitled cause is now filed iu the office of the clerk of the district court of the state of Iowa, la and for Kossuth county, claiming of you. the sum of $558 as money justly duo from you and. interest thereon at eight per cent, from the' liitli day of May, 1800, for money due on your promissory note and ihe accounts sot out In said petition; also that the First National bank of Algona has been garnished under a writ of attachment issued herein; and that unless you appear thereto and defend before noipn. of the second day of tho March term, 1891, of tho said court, which will commence ut Algo ua on the 'M day of March, 1801, default \nll be entered against you and judgment rendered" GEO. E. OLARKE, Plaintiffs' Attorney. thereon. ORIGINAL NOTICE. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE of Iowa, iu and for Kossuth County—March Term, A. D. 1801.—Mavilla Wagoner vs. Alec Wagoner. To said defendant: You are hereby notified, that the petition of the plaintiff in the abqve- eutltled cause is filed iu the office Of the cleric of the district court of the state of Iowa in and for Kossuth county, claiming of you a divorce for wilful desertion; aud that unless you appear thereto and defend befpre 'noon of tlie second day of the March term, A. D. 1801, of said court, which win commence at Aigona oft the second day of March, 1891, default -will be entered against you and judgment rendered. : theaeon. GEO. E. OLABKB, Attorney Ip^r^ajntJfl. ,4 :7

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