The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa on November 25, 1891 · Page 5
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The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa · Page 5

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, November 25, 1891
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Page 5
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J1 I>H;A;N .- A .% A. 10 HA, vv MR. MAt.LORY'3 WONDERFUL WELL. Punch Switch Outdid lt««lf Wtott tt told the Diggers to Dig There. Mt. Austin Mallory is a farmer livitjg In the northern portion of this county. Some time since he decided to have a •well dug on his premises, The services Of ft water witch were called into requisition, and the turn of the infallible peach tree switch located a spot where •Water would be struck. The well diggers set to work, but had not gone more than six feet when they encountered a stratum of rock. They went down into the solid rock ten, twenty, thirty, forty feet, and yet no indication that the rock was giving out- Mr. Mallory instructed his men to blast away, as lie was bent on finding water if he had to blast into the Chinese empire. They followed his instructions and went ten feet 'farther down, with no new developments. They were soon to be rewarded, however. All the prepjirations for an unusually heavy blast hud been made, the fuse was touched off, and the men were drawn out to await results. After the smoke of the explosion had cleared out they looked down and found that they had struck a cave, Lights were let down to bo sure there was no damp, and three or four Ventured, Some bystanders agreed to investigate the discovery. They were lowered with ropes through the opening down into a cavern whose darkness had never been pierced with the light of day, and whose infinite silence took up the Bound of their voices and echoed and reechoed it until it died away in some rocky recess. Their auspenso as they descended into the darkness was intense, until their feet touched the floor of the cavern. Striking a match they proceeded to look about them. The roof of the cave was covered with pendant stones, consisting of glittering minerals, that flashed the light in strange and beautiful effects. At some points the stalagmite and stalactite formations almost touched each other. At other places in the roof were quaint, regularly shaped arches that gave au impression as if they had been built by human hands. Still other portions of the roof were smooth and studded with a peculiar incrustation, which glittered like diamonds, and far surpassing in beauty the star chamber in the Mammoth cave. Wandering about the explorers came upon a small river of crystal clearness, in whose waters strange looking fish disported themselves, and whose merry ripples had furnished music for centuries with no other audience than the eternal rocks. A pool of water was also found which, so far as they could sound, was bottomless. On the banks of the stream were found the wreckage of what had once undoubtedly been an Indian canoe, drifted there, doubtless, from some other water course, and preserved so long by the pure atmosphere of the cave. The adventurers explored the cave for a considerable distance in each direction, but found no limit or reduction of size. — Franklin (Ivy.) Cor. Louisville Courier- Journal. JOHN CHAPMAN, OF ftAMAPO. f Ne«d6d to Fill A tontf felt Wfcttfc Which th« Fat Man Refuged to Reengage. It was a late boat crossing tho Erie ferry, and there were only three 6f four passengers la the men's eabhi Ofte of them was a thin man With ft Idflg Hiwn duster and a tall white hat. Although there were many vacant Beats, this passenger, after a deliberate inspection of the interior, went to the far dottier 01 the cabin and sat down in a seat next to a fat man with a big valise. "John Chapman, of Ramapd!" exclaimed the spare man, "How are you tonight?" The fat man stared a moment at the speaker and then said: . "I am not John Chapman, of Ramapo, but I nm quite well tonight." "Not John Chapman, of Ramapo?" said the thin man, apparently much surprised. "Why, are you sure?" "Well, 1 guess 1 ought to know who 1 am!" exclaimed the fat man. "Certainly, sir, cdrtainly; to be surel" replied the thin mai. "But, mercy I how could I be so much (mistaken? Why, if I had gone on with kvluit 1 had on my mind 1 would have been mortified beyond measure! L w[is so sure you were John Chapman, of itamapo." "Mistakes like tliat frequently happen," said the fat man. "Yes. I know," said the thin man. "It is not tho mistake I deplore so much, The thought of the mortification I would have suffered if 1 had gone on and done what 1 had on my mind, and then found that you were not John Chapman, of Ramapo, ia what annoys me. Mercy!" The fat man bowed. " YOH, indeed," continued the thin man. "1 don't know what made me pause on this occasion, for I always go right up to John and without ceremony say, 'Loan me a dollar till tomorrow.' Now, if 1 had done that tonight, and, after you had loaned me the dollar, I had discovered that you were not John Chapman, of Ramapo, just see how deadly my mortification would have been. Mercy! It makes me cold to think of it!" The fat man assured him, with a smile, that there would have been no occasion whatever for mortification on that score. "Thanks! thanks!" exclaimed the thin man. "You are very kind. But I don't know as 1 ought to accept it even until tomorrow. It' you. were only John Chapman, of Ramapo, now! You are exceedingly like him in looks and manner!" The fat man bowed, but the smile was missing. The boat was now nearing her slip. "If, as you say, my fears of Toeing mortified beyond measure if I had gone at you as John Chapman, of Ramapo, are groundless," said the thin man blandly, "1 will put the thought aside and accept the loan—but only till tomorrow! Only till tomorrow!" The fat man grabbed his valise and hurried ou deck, looking back once or twice to sea if the thin man was in pursuit. He wasn't. He sat still and watched tho fat man as ke disappeared across the gangplank. Then ho aror>e and mopped his foietenstfl -with a red As A preventative and elite fofcrdup, Chamberlain's Cough Remedy has no rival. It ia, in fact,, the only remedy thttt can always be depended upon and that is pleasant and safe to take. There ie not •- -i •—-•« Ul*« u \j\_f l'(»l» V t AUVJAV^ ftp M W « the.leant danger in giving it to children, as it Contains no injurious substance". For sale at 50 cents per bottle by Dr. L. A. Shectz. ' $6,000 Worth of Clothing Cheap, Get your visiting cards the REPUBLICAN office. at "Ohl how dreadfully yellow and greasy my face is getting." Say do you know this is all caused by a disordered liver, and that your skin can be changed from a dark greasy yellow to a transpareht white by the use of Brags' Blood Purifier and Blood Maker? Every bottle guaranteed by F. W. Dingley. the can 8- CD Q d •i-< A 43 O Colic, Diarrhoea, Dysentery and all kindred complaints fire dangerous if nl- lowed to run any length of time. So it is tbe duty of nil parents to keep a medicine on hand at till times that will dl'ect a positive nnd permanent cure. Begirs' Diarrhoea Bnlsam is giwniuteed to do this. Sold and warranted by F. W, Dingley. D, B. AVEY, And dealer in HORSE SUPPLIES. O «<H O ,d •J& ?H O CLOTHING SALE. Must be sold AT ONCE. AND i":* t <.<! -y i't , i, * R O CD We will match any closing out prices or any other prices in the northwest. All we ask is for you to call in and see our #oods and see for yourselves. Yours truly, Neatly done on sliort notice. AtLacy'sokl stsuirt, opposite nant House, Algona, Iowa. Ten $6,000 Worth of Clothing Cheap. No Need of Having "Lopped Ears." It seems odd that BO many mothers see the fault of broadened ear lobes and bending tops, yet do not raise a finger to rectify this defect. Their own ears "lop," BO, they suppose, must those of their poor children. If their own eara are put on "bias," why grumble if those of their offspring are not straight? A woman may hide her ears—may brush the long strands of her silken hair down from her temples and over the tops of these useful organs; not so a man. His barber shaves him until his head is blue, and each knob of vanity, or whatsoever weakness he may possess, shows plainly forlih—a lesson that the phrenological who run may read, and his ears stand anchored in uncouth, bristling boldness at each side of his denuded cranium. Now even he, a grown man, can remedy this defect. Let him each night tie a soft, close bandage about his head and eleep in this. If it be difficult to keep it in place let him wear above the bandage a close cap, pinning the cap and bandage together on the outside with small safety pins. Continued use of the bandage will show good effects in a comparatively early date, and the deformity will gradually disappear.—Detroit Free Press. What Was lu Ills Mind. A young barrister, who was a long headed lawyer in n too unpleasantly literal sense of the term, had to deal with a country witness who had a habit of cautiously pausing before replying to a question. "Come, Mr. Baconface, what are you thinking about?" at length asked the impatient barrister. "I've just been thinking," returned the countfyinan, "what a foine dish uiy bacon face and your calf's head would make together." The wigged gentleman dropped such a dangerous customer like a hot potato, and ho was allowed to resume his seat amid the titter of the court.—London Tit-Bits. Scotch Logic. A Scotch minister was startled by the original views of n not very skillful plowman whom he had just hired He noticed that tho furrows ' were far from straight, and eaifl: "John, yer drills are no near straucht avaj that ia no like Tammie's work"— "Tftuunie" being the person who had previously plowed the glebe. "TawHjie didna ken his wark," observed tbe man coolly, as he turned his team about; "ye see, when the drills is crookit tho sun gets in on a' sides, an so ye get early tatties."—Youth's Companion. "It's singular, nowadays, how tight the mone3' market is." said he.—New York Sun. Electricity in Agriculture. On« of the first to recognize the great importance of utilizing electricity for fanning purposes in England was the Marquis of Salisbury, who not only uses the water power on his estate for lighting by electricity, but also grinds his corn, cuts his horse fodder, pumps his water and does a variety of other work by means of electric motors. On many manors which are adjacent to streams of water th« farmers are beginning to realize the great possibilities which are close at hand for the more economical working of their farms and are installing electrical plants which can be worked at a cost nnapproached by any other meana. There are teu.sof thousands of portable aud other steam engines owned by agriculturists in tin* country which could be utilized in a variety of ways in connection with electricity. The mere saving in insurance alone would in numberless cases justify a farmer in driving his thrashing, chaff cutting and grinding machinery by an electric motor instead of being obliged to bring his engine, as now, right into his farm buildings.— New York Telegram. You don't want a torpid liver. You don't want a had complexion. You don't want a bad hreutti. You don't wiiut a headache. Then use De Witt's Little Early Risers, the famous little pills. Dr. L. A, Sheet/. (CYCLES. UDIES- GENTLEMEN PKCIAl, ATTF.NTION will bp -riven to all kinds of ropi'ii'iim. iiK-lmliiii: Tinware.. Gasoline Stoves, <itm.-i. I'umq.s ;iinl Clothes Wringers. Am al^o i»P|>;uv<l ID |n!l iii Fiinuices ;ilid do plumhliw mil! ('.us I'lpti iittina. Iron nnd Tin roollnu. " I'l-ompi ntU'iiviou will be given to all kinds ol ,vork in house. Ninth of court F. L. PARISH. RS, Jr. Oan be made in o months selling Tuuisoii's -Atlases, Charts and Wall Maps. Particulars free. H. C TOfflSOI, Chicago, Ills, Matson, McOall & Co, Have Fall lately received a full stock of RILEY & YOUNG'S Combination SLAT and WIRE FENCE. H IH a fc.nco for open countries, 1'ov it cannot be, blown tlmvn. It is the fence for low lands, fur it, cannot, he wasUi'il away. It destroys no ground whatever, and if lipaiity tie considered an iuivantii.u'K. it is vim neatest and handsomest farm icnfrt in the world. In short, it combines the pood qualities of 'all fences In an eminent degree, and as soon as introduced will liecome t;l)e, popular Fence i>i' ll) f ' country. It is beautiful and durable. It is strong and will increase the. |iri;:e of your farm far more tluni uny other fence. It, will last much longer than any other fence. Jt is a great addition, occupies less ground, excludes less .sunshine, has no superior as a fence. It is stronger than any other fence and will turn any slock no matter how bre.icliy. U is plainly visible and is nor. dangerous 'to stock like barb wire. The best horse fence in the world. It will protect all crops from a half grown chicken to a wild ox. It is the most uniform, and by comparison of cost iinich tbe cheapest. Kept,for sale in all parts of Kossuth county. Made by Itlley & Voting, Algona, lowa. A ^ i?N Tliis space is reserved for Dr L. K. Gavliekl. who will sell U any bicycle not represented by A^ts. in Algona ' -^A ^ 0 THEfS A New Book from Cover to Cover. FULLY ABREAST OF THE TIMES. ID. L. Down's HEALTH EXERCISER. • l ' .I'M Braln-Wotiero 4 Sedentary People: Gentlemen, Ladles, Youths; tbe Athlete or Invalid. A complete gymnasium. Takes up but 6 la. Bquarefloor-roomjuew.scientific, durable, comprehensive, chenp. Indorsed by'SO.ooOpnysielans. lawyers, clergymen, editors & others now using it. Send for tll'd circular,40 enK's; ao charge. Prof. D. . J... Dowcl.Tsqlentlflo PUraleal and. foual Culture, 0 East lltli at., .New Vork, Goods To which they call the attention of their customers. Sen Water fur Weak Weak eyes should be (Strengthened by bathing them five or ten minutes at ft time in full basins of eea water, which «jLioW4 the hands to lave ifce closed eyes, tbe water welling over them, patly withr outphock. No cue ban any idea of the tgie? to overtasked eyes til tfcey have fated this method. Youmigfct f«p agood ™*_ _r_j _ Is a constitutional and not ji local disease, and therefore It cannot l)o cured by local applications. It requires a constitutional remedy liUo Hood's Sarsaparilla, which, working through the blood, eradicates the Impurity which causes and promotes tho disease, and Catarrh effects a permanent cure. Thousands of people testify to tho success of Hood's Sarso- purtllu as a remedy for catarrh when other preparations had failed. Hood's garsapartlln also builds up tho whole system, and makes you feel renewed lu health and strength. Catarrh "I used Hood's Sarsaparilla for catarrh, aud received great relief and benefit from It, The catarrh was very disagreeable, especially hi the winter, causing constant discharge from my nose, ringing noises in my cars, and pains lu the back of my head. The effect to clear Catarrh my head lu tbe morning by hawking and spitting was painful. Hood's Sarsaparllla gave me relief immediately, whilo lu iluie I was entirely cured. I aw never without Hood's Barsaparllla in my house as 1 think it is worth Its weight in gold." Hits. a. B. GWB, 1028 Eighth Btre^ N. W., WwWflgtojR, P, 0. Heed's «'A DESIRABLE CHRISTMAS PRESENT." . The Capital City Commercial College and The Capital City School of Shorthand, Des Moinee, Iowa. The leading schools of commerce in the west. If you wish to succeed in business life, you should prepare for it. These schools have furnished hundreds of positions for their graduates. For catalogue and further information aldrees J. M. MJCIIAN, Fres. "1000 Publications for , SewJ 10 cwu fcrsamplecopir. «TFyou«)t»eribe<]<br 1000 different publication end but A ou« hundred hours a ilny instead of twemy-four to leua them In. you mlvht injusllily lift tlw wheat ftom tbe cbail ana cctutllulkMttliitiFi. '1'liu tvuulU out you tlU.UOO a year; Out vim cm pot the luforumliim fur *a n year, aim it l> culled The Uevtew of Uevleni, ' tlw buiy inuu'n uiagtzlno.' " — I'BO- VlT41U.lt APVEBTISUiO. ________ Ittlds Frances Wlllard.-" Tbe brightest outlook window in Christendom for busy t>w|>le wlio want to we what it Rolug ou la the world." Hon. K. J. FbelpN, Ex-Minister to England. — "Is doing an excellent work, and last busy land. — "Is doing an excellent wor making (or itself a prominent place. Cardinal Oll»l>oM».-"To the world it will be especially welcome." The ConsreawtionalUt.-This monthly has no peer in originality of design, scope and accuracy of vision, thoroughness in executiott „,«! abUUjr to truntlurm Ha readers TuloclUzCMOfthe world." X»rovl domio Teleerain.-"A great .boon to the busy, ths Jazy and the economical." Are YOU taking THIS NEW MAGAZINE ? which everybody U talking about fll •ad most people are reading i If not ywi 8HOVLP 8U9SORIM befor« January 1, .when tbe yearly pr to WEBSTER'S INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY A GRAND INVESTMENT For tho Family, the School or the Library. The Authentic Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, comprising the issues of 1864, '79 and '84 (still copyrighted) haa 'been thoroughly revised and enlarged, and as a distinguishing title, boars the name of Webster's International Dictionary. The work of revision occupied over ten years, more than a, hundred editorial laborers having been employed, and over $300,000 expended before tho first copy wan printed. SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. A Pamphlet of specimen jmjies, illustrations, testimonials,etc., gent free by the i-ulilishcrs. Caution is needed in jmrclm.-hr .lirtiunavy, as photographic reprints of nu oU- • mul comparatively worthless edition of \V<..>.-ti i 4 iiro being marketed under various mimea raid al'teu by misrepresentation. GET THE BEST, Tho International, v/hieh bears tho imprint of G. & C. WIERRIAM & CO., PUBLISHERS, SPRINGFIELD, Mass., U.S.A. FARM LOANS. We can now make loans on Improved Lands from one to ten year's time and give the borrower the privilege of v^yinK the wli loan or any part thereof in even $100 at any time when interest due. This is Iowa Money, and no second mortgage or wupties ate taken. This plan of making a loan will enable the borrower to je* duce his mortgage at any time and save the interest on the paid. Money furnished at ouee ou perfect title. VJ"OH Al'I'UCATIOH. _ VIEW OP REVIEWS, H. HOXIK, Algona, To\va, LEGAL BLANKS o "^pfl^ ^f ^p^^ H|9

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