The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa on August 12, 1891 · Page 9
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The Algona Republican from Algona, Iowa · Page 9

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Algona, Iowa
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Wednesday, August 12, 1891
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IOWA STATE NEWS. Ovcfr an RmVmrilcmtint. St. Lotus train No. 7 on the Wajftish froad was wrecked, abort t 85 miles cast of' t)es Mothes. A brdken rail caused j the accident and three coaches wore plunged down an embankment. Fifteen people vvefe in the sleeper ami in the first coach, and of this number four Were injured, none fatally. J. L. Piel, of New York, was considerably bruised about the body, and a lady and her lit« tie girl from Ottumwa were also injured. _ itog'Cholcrn. Hogs are dying in great numbers from cholera in the south part of Black Hawk county, where the disease has broken out afresh. The townships of Lincoln, Orange arid Eagle are the affected districts. The same locality suffered severely from the ravages of the disease last spring, H. J. Lachty, an extensive farmer in Orange township, has been the heaviest loser, only seven animals being lefb out of 850. How lie Got Him Beer lluolc. F.lght Ijjpgs of beer consigned to J. J. Maginnis, at Manson, were seized and confiscated by a constable from Rockwell City. Maginnis, when he heard of his loss, disguised himself with a black mask and held, up the constable, who was carting away the beer, at the point of a revolver. Maginnis recovered his beor, but later lost his liberty and was placed in jail. Fatally Kicked and Founded. Frank Murphy, chief operator at the Union depot in Sioux City, was discharged. Re thought that Alex. Gray, the night operator, was responsible, and he got drunk and went to the depot to thrash Gray. He knocked him down and kicked and pounded him until he fractured Gray's skull. Physicians 5aid Gray could not recover. Fight In a Church. Rev. J. E. Stewart and Elder T. D. Wilson, fought to a finish in the United Presbyterian church at Milo. A. dispute had arisen which led to unpleasant words, then to force and later to blows. Stewart, being a younger man and with more, science, soon had the elder beaten. All of the participants were arrested. A Ruin Decision. Atty. Gen. Stone has written a tetter to the Sioux City law and order league saying that fines on the saloon men paid to the city can be recovered and turned over to the county school fund if the legal proofs are available. The city collects about §5,000 monthly from the saloon men. Hopeful of the Sugar licet. Northwestern Iowa farmers who planted sugar beet seed last spring for an experiment are feeling vei-y" hopeful of satisfactory results. In all cases where the seed was planted and the phuits cultivated according to directions the beets are now thriving and are ripening 1 fast. News in liner. Otto Bcymer was killed near Afton by falling from a bee tree while he was sawing off a large limb. ./ Fremont county farmers estimate t,hat this fall wheat will average thirty- five bushels to the acre. A. G. Tracy, ' living one-half mile south of Spencer, was killed by lightning and his daughter was seriously injured. Mary and Bertha, daughters of G. Thompson, a hardware dealer at Cedar Falls, were drowned while bathing. TL/y were aged 17 and 19 years. Ontj df the heirs to a large fortune left by a rich relative in New York is Mrs. John Anderson, the wife of a Keokuk fireman. Rev. Fayetto Dowd, prominent in state temperance work, died in Burlington. Marion F. Rogers was arrested at Shenandoah and returned to Blakesburg, where he stole $100 from a farmer named Kinder. A 10-year-old child of Philip Neallis, of Sheffield, accidentally fell into n water tank and was drowned. A union of the three leading gypsum stucco mills of Fort Dodge was announced by the incorporation of the Iowa Plaster association, with a capi tal stock of $300,000, The Fort Madison Stock-Yards company was organized with a capital ol $100,000. It will build » large stockyards and a great packing-house. Farmers in southeastern Iowa are putting up the largest crop of hay they have for many years. The 7-year-old son of John Stevens, of Milton, was thrown from a horse and dragged about the field for some hours by the halter-strap. His injuries were fatal. Swindlers are securing insurance premiums fpom the farmers of Hancock and adjacent counties in Iowa, vmdev the plea of renewing loans at a low rate of interest Samuel Cooper, who was arrested with others charged with conspiracy to rob the American saving bank in Pet Moineb, was adjudged insane and ordered sent to the Clarinda hospital A three foot vein of lead ore was (Us* <sovered op th,e farm of J. llalbiug, near Breda, in Carroll county, at a depth of 800feefe ^vpurt miners at Carroll reported that the ore was of the finest quality. James JS^fp's, block farm near West Grove was burned, including' five st&l- Jious valued at $1,000 eaeh. I nsurauce, $3,000. T. L. Brown W» Wafted at Sio«x City, upon a Fejjuisitilpa from ICan- Mas for fraud ill comiection with the failure of lUe UyainJ^d,^ frank four years ago. Frank VerUesser, who l|v«*dl 3 wiles jVoi-tUeast of Pilot Uroye, ia i*a (County, while attempting to climb on g Joa4 of and feUbstweao the Uojaje? t&u wag-on. The uuhyale " BIG EIRE INL OHIO/EGO* Dry ttnotln dml Other Artlctfca; Valued »t ft Million Dollars Kestrrtyetl '*- Sleffel, Cooper & Co. tho Heaviest Loners. CHICAGO, Aug. 4.—Stegol, Cooper A Co.'s fmmense dry goods and notions establishment at State .and Adams street wan totally destroyed by fjre this morning. Half a million dollars' worth of assorted stock %vas entirely consumed and nothing bitt bare walls arc left where a magnificent trade palace stood. Unfortunately the fire could not be prevented from spreading, arid at 8:80 o'clock a number of other firms had suffered much damage. ''The Leader" dry goods store on the opposite corner caught fire several times, and Mr. Pincus, the manager, thought that the damage by fire, smoke, and water would reach from 9100,000 to ,S150,000. Next door south of Hiegel, Cooper & Co.'s is J. \V. Berry's large confectionery house, and his loss was 81,000 by water. The flames communicated to the rear of J. II. Walker & Co.'s dry goods store at the corner of Wabash avenue and Adams street. Here fire, smoke and water caused a loss of $25,000. Then ;he occupants of F. R. Hilger's build* ,ng at 207 and 209 Wabash avenue suffered as follows: C. Heunecke, pottery, §40,000; J. A. .Bryant, pianos, $7,000; women's exchange, $500; I. W. Baird, pictures, $10,000. Charles Brown, who has a European hotel at 37 and 39 Adams street, lost about 81,000 from water and smoke. Siegel, Cooper & Co. occupied six stores on State street, extending south from the corner. The building, valued at $100,000, was four stories high and was half a block deep on Adams street, extending to the alley which separates it from .). H. Walker & Co. The fire was first discovered by Officer M. Sullivau, who turned in the first alarm. When Officer Sullivan first saw the blaze it shot out into State street from the first floor and seemed to emanate from what is known as the exchange room. No one seemed to be able 1x3 tell what caused the blaze. Once started the flames had full sweep. Inside were great light shafts and a number of elevators through which the blaze swept with the force of a small cyclone. .There was any amount of material for it to feed on. From small wooden toys to costly Persian rugs the stock offered splendid opportunities for the tongue of flame. Up the elevator shafs went the blazes, and out through the roof and into the murky atmosphere they shot. A heavy pall of smoke hung in the rain- charged air, and this cloud was seen for miles by the thousands of people hurrying down town to their work. Eight hundred employes, from messenger boys and cash girls to managers of departments, soon stood around the corners and mixed with the hundreds attracted to the scene by the fire. In the building at the time the fire broke out were some twenty-five em- | ployes. All escaped without injury except Manager Wixon, who dropped from the fourth story to a balcony on the third story and was bruised and shaken. One of the bookkeepers who was sorting over some of the record books said that from 815,000 to S30.000 was burned up in the flames, or at least the money was in the store safe and had probably been burned inside the safe. FIENpS WRECK A TRAIN, Accident to the AJiicklnitW EtproM on th* (Irnnd KHptdft £ Indian* Houd-Twenty 1'ersoim ln.Jitrod. KALAMAZOO, Mich., Aug. G.—Thegaofc Mackinaw express on the Grand Rapids & Indiana road was derailed a few miles north of here Wednesday after* noon and the whole train dttched. The train was running at a rate of 35 milca an hour, and after leaving Cooper Engineer Clark Snyder saw :two rails ahead that seemed to lap. He knew something was wrong and applied the air-brake, but to no purpose. The smoking, baggage and express and one day coach rolled down the left side of the track and the sleeper went down a 30-foot embankment at the right, turning completely over twice. The scene was one of great confusion and for a time it was thought a number were killed in the sleeper. About twenty were injured more or less, but some got away without giving their names. The following is the list so far as ascertained: Dr. H. I?. Carrlel, Ohiongo, badly bruised; Mlllard R. Powers, Chicago, arm broken, cuts In heud, face and log; A. O. Davldls, Chicago, badly bruised; George Parsons, Chicago, hand mashed; A. Con way, Fort Wayne, .head cut; N. B. Williamson, Trenton, N. J., arm hurt, heafl badly cut; F. A. Burnham, Medina, N. Y., head cut; C. A. Shellman, Baltimore, Mrt., face cut and head bruised; MIsa Carrie Hawley, Niles, Mloh., badly bruised; W. S. Brntt, Grand Rapids, shoulder dislocated; J. Earl Kay. Grand Rapids, shoulder dislocated; Mrs. J. Earl Kay, badly bruised; Miss Maud Haines, Plalnwell, side bruised; Mrs. Mary Ripton, Kalamazoo, hand cut; Luther Waterman, Lowell, Mich,, bndly bruised and injured internally; Itlenry J. Dykchouse, Grand Rapids, bad scalp •vounds. Mr. and Mrs. J. Earl Kay, of Grand Rapids, who were both seriously injured, were on their wedding tour. The bride was a Miss Lanzon, of Grand Rapids. Railroad officials insist that the track was tampered with. One official says on careful examination it was found that on the end of the ties there lay the nuts which had been unscrewed from the ends of the bolts securing 1 the ends of the rails and the fish plates. BENEATH THE ENGINE. FAILED FOR MILLIONS. AVeHlentf Vin a West Virginia Road—One Killed ixnrt Many Injured. CiuniEiu,ANi>, Md., Aug. 6.—A frightful accident occurred at a point called Switch Back on the West Virginia Central railroad, about 60 miles from here, Wednesday. As usual the men, seventeen in number, boarded the tramroad engine to go to their work in the lumber regions. Two women asked permission to ride out a short distance to a berry patch. Their request was granted, and the engine containing the nineteen passengers started on its journey. It had hardly gotten under good headway when it struck a piece of timber that was lying on the track, turning it completely over. None of the people on the engine had a chance to escape and all were more or less injured. The dead and injured are: John McKenzie, scalded to death; Frano Graver, scalded and bruised; Jennie Durst, scalded and bruised; Lewis Layman, scalded; John Rickey, hurt internally; Robert Robinson, engineer, scalded and bruised: Alice Robinson, burned and scalded, fatally injured. Easy to Itmcfc A Pullman Car now runs from Chicago toManitou Springs without change via the Banta FeRoute.- It passes through Kansas City, Pueblo and Colorado. Springs. It leaves Dem-born Station, Chicago, on the Denver Limited at six o'clock p. m. and reaches Manitou at half past eight the second morning. No other line can offer this accommodation. You must change cars on any other line. Pullmnn Palace Cars are run by the Santa Fo Route without change from Chi-, cago 1o Las Vegas, Hot Springs, Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo. Manitou and many other Rooky Mountain Summer Resorts t.o which Excursion tickets are being Bold at 213 Clark Street, Chicago. The Only one Ever Printed. Can You Find the Word/ Each week, a different 3 Inch display Is published in this paper. There are no two words alike in either ad., except One word, This word will bo found in the ad. for Dr. Haftoi; s Iron Tonic, Littlo Liver Pills amj Wild Cherry Bitters. Look for " Crescent" trade mark. Read tho ad. carefully and wnen y.m find the word, send it to them and they will return you a book, beautiful lltho- graphs and sample free. Send Honey and Bny Direct From factory. Avoid middlemen's profits. ».0 top buggy only $33; $100 four-passenger top carriage only $17.r,0; «10 buggy harness only $4. io. Send for No. 3 FREB catalogue as ndvertiscditithispuperbytheTJ. S. Buggy & Cdrt Co., Cincinnati, O., leaders of W prices, and who belong to no pool or combination which charges double prices. "THEHE are some unpleasant features in this business," muttered the photographer as he surveyed a row of his patrons.—Baltimore American^ A. Model Railway. The Burlington Route, C., B. & Q. R, R. operates 7,000 miles of road, with termini in Chicago. St. Louis, St. Paul, Ornaliaj Kansas City and Denver. For speed, safety, comfort, equipment, track, and efficient service it has no equal. Tho Burlington gains new patrons, but loses none. » THOUGH not catchy, the song of the back fence warbler is undoubtedly sat-chin.—In- dianapoas Journal. Commendable. All claims not consistent with the high character of Syrup of Figs are purposely avoided by tho Cal Fig Syrup Company. It act j gently on the kidneys, liver and bowels, cleansing the system effectually, but it 's not !i cure-all und makes no pretensions that every bottlo will not substantiate. "DERE'S millions in it," said theold darky, as ho gazed over the fence at the watermelon patch.—Binghamton Republican. ALWAYS avoid harsh purgative pills. They first miiko you siclc and then leave you constipated. Carter's Little Liver Pills regulate the bowels and make you well. Dose, one pill. Itf casting about for a national flower, the wall-flower, as usual, is quite forgotten.— Boston Transcript. HEW, angry eruptions yield to the action •of Glenn's Sulphur Soap. Hill's Hair and Whisker Dye, 50 cents. THE scholar who takes the iirst priae in arithmetic is only a figure-head.—Boston Courier. m ABE unlike all other pills. No purging or pain. Act specially on the liver and bile. Carter's Little Liver Fills. One pili a dose. WHERE the iron enters into the sole—at the shoemaker's.—Mail and Express. BitoxcniTis is cured by frequent small doses of Piso's Cure lor Consumption. Sssssssss S Swlft't Specific A Tested Remedy For All | Blood and Skin s s s s s s s EIGHT LIVES SACRIFICED. THE MARKETS. Abraham Backer, a Xow York Commercial 1'apor Dealer, Forced to the Wall- Had Speculations the Cause. NEW YORK, Aug. 4. — Abraham Backer, of the dry-goods commission house of A. Backer & Co., No. 285 Broadway, a heavy dealer in commercial paper, assigned Monday. His liabilities are estimated at about $4,000,000, of which $3,500,000 are direct and 81,500,000 contingent. The principal creditors are banks in this and other cities. There are also some individual creditors. It is understood that over a third of the liabilities consists of notes indorsed by Mr. Backer,-\vhich'- will-be taken care of by their makers, and Mr. Backer believes that if his assets are properly handled they will mOi'e than cover the remaining two thirds. His friends believe that the creditors will all be paid in full. Mr. Backer was very popular in financial and mercantile circles, had the confidence of banks and bankers in this city and elsewhere, was a director in city banks and in several southern banks. He hud a number of bank accounts where he got* his paper discounted'. Mr. Backer's assignment, it is said, is principally due to the condition of the money market, which made It very difficult for him to float the quantity of commercial paper which' he generally handled and also to the decline in certain southern railroad bonds in which he was a large holder, Eia trouble, it is stated, in relation to southern railroad bonds .was the result of his connection with the. Macon Construction Company, of Macon, Ga. The assets, according to one who is familiar with Mr. Backer's j'.lt'airs, include about $1,500,000 'of tho bonds of the Georgia Southern £ Florida, .railroad and the Macon & Birmingham railroad, about $700,000 Alabama stata bonds and a large amount of other securities, a valuable mill plant at Glastonbury, Conn., and $150,000 to $iQO,OOQ worth of real estate in York city. The trouble, lie said, entirely due to tight money and losses ia connection with tho Macpq Construction Company and the decline In the securities of the southern railroads which he had invested in. AU, BOUND FOR AMERIQA. Fatal Collision on the Ogrdensburg; (N. Y.) Kiillroad. KOCTBE'S POINT, N. Y., Aug. 6.—The east bound train on the Ogdensburg & Lake Champlain railroad, due here at 0:50 p. m., collided with a Sunday- school excursion train just east of Champlain station at that hour Wednesday night. Eight passengers were killed, from ten to fifteen were badly injured, and a number of others were badly hurt. The two engines and ears were telescoped. All the injured and killed were in the first car of the excursion train, the second car being forced half Us length into the first The engineer of the excursion train says that the LIVE STOCK—Cuttlo Sheep 4 23 .Hops 4 80 FLOUU—Fair to Fancy......... 4 10 Minnesota Patents 4 Si) WHEAT-No. a Reel Ungraded Red CORN—No. 2 Ungraded Mixed OATS—Mixed Western RYE—September Western i POIIK—Mess, New. YoilK, Aug. 8. *8 10 (?» 4 30 (ft 5 75 © .') 80 frft r> 10 46 5 50 as 95 :« 8!J lip SIS'/; ((A 1 08 73 43 85 13 75 air brakes refused to work and, it ing a heavy train on a down grade, versing the engine had no effect. FARMERS IN CONTROL. LAUD—Western Steam (i T2!//£8 « BUTTER—Western Creamery. 14 <» 18-/4 CHICAGO. BEEVES-Sbipping Steers.... W 50 fi/j 0 :!:-, Cows 150 ® 4 00 Stockers 2(50 iVO 3 50 Feeders H 40 ©430 Butchers' Steers !i 75 (yl 4 40 Bulls 1 50 OS 3 50 HOGS-Live 405 & 5 80 SHEEP a r>o fa r> ao BUTTER—Creamery Kt <a 18 Good to Choice Dairy 11 <& 15 EGGS—Fresh.... 11 «.C 15 BROOM CORN— Hurl '--y© 5V4 Self-working :i'/»<W 4»i Damaged 'tV-(<% "?g POTATOES (per bu.) new 3s <$ 46 i PORK—Mess 10-,T> ix 10 37'/J LARD-Stcam (i « re- They Elect a Majority of the Members In the Kentucky Legislature. LOUISVITJ.K, Ky., Aug. 6.—Late Kentucky election returns are favorable in every instance to the farmers, and there is no longer any doubt that they will control the next legislature. They are not all alliance or people's party men, however, although the people's party has surprised the democrats by electing no less than thirteen of their candidates. The political complexion ol the house is democrats, Qg; republicans, 17; people's pavty, 18;" independent democrat, t, and one district doubtful. The farmers of all parties number fifty-six, besides several country merchants and teachers, whose sympathies are in the same direction. Brown's (dem.) plurality for governor is between 25,000 and 30,000. be- FLOUR—Si.ririg- Patents Winter Patents f> 10 Bakers' 4 III GRAIN—Wheat. No. 2 August. HI Corn, No. 8 August Oats, No. 8 a?3 Rye, No. 2 74 Uuvlev, No. 2 September... flS LUMBER— Siding I90:.i Flooring 33 O'J Common Boards 13 00 Fencing 13 (XI Lath, Dry •'-' »> Shingles S 00 ST. LOUIS. CATTLE-Steers *4 SO Texuns and Indians 9 10 HOC5S—Fair to Choice Heavy., 5 4J Mixed Grades 4 Sio SHEEP -J » OMAHA. CATTLE—Good to Fancy 4 X> Butchers' Steers :> 75 HOUS.... I 75 SHEEP..; ;.' 50 © (ft -1 ! (5 45 :> 75 5 25 iuj a 00 IX) 50 00 80 00 <fc ft 75 (fit 3 BO @ 5 50 f(« :i 40 © 4 7ft © 5 r>5 <& 4 5'J @ 5 15 00 Ku«*b|n Je\v» Look on the u« tlie f.Hiul uf LOJJPOV, Aug. i.—T who left Hamburg last week took passage for |Lo»dou, I^verpaal, Glasgow and other British ports, whence most of thenj will start by 4M* e »»nt lines for the United State!?. T^e programme is not to land them aU at QBB place, but io divide them up bet\veeii the leading American seaports, $p, that they way act. attract too inuch tion and opposition FLOODS IN MEXICO. Kxtensive Fanning Tr*»«ts Uu4er Wate* and Crop* Oestroyed. CITY ov MBXICO, Aug. 6.— Heavy rains have fallen incessantly since the 15th of last month in the grain producing districts of tike st*te of Ver» Ct uz The rivers Pasaloapau and Sap Juan nave been forced over their banks and extensive farming tracts are under water. All crops in consequence are reported to be a failure and ^fce situation in this part of the republic is desperate. Hundreds of cattle feave been drowned. Thtf fruit crop is a partial loss, and if the flood continues every tree will be killed. YOBK, A'flgv «,^-The census ol the Presbyterian church, as compiled by J)r. NVilliain. Henry Roberts, shows a {growth in uuinbxirs during the last year. The whole number of member* 18,800,796, an increase of 1*9,000 for the last six years; churches, 7,070,' increase, TSU; ministers, 0,33d, increase, «77; candidates for the ministry, 1,817, increase, 411; Sunday -school scholars, 888,080; pabtors os4s4)D.«d, 8*5; pastpw 34,476; churchei A reliable cure for Contagious Blood Poison, Inherited Scrofula and Skin Cancer. As a tonic for delicate Women and Children it has no equal. Being purely vegetable, ia harmless in its effects. A treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed FREE on application. Druggists Sell It. SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., Drawer 3, Atlanta, Ga. ssssssss§ 8 S S s s s s s s s s The Soap that Cleans Most is Leno x. I have Tried the new five cent package of Pyle's Pearline and like it — decidedly — economical for use — economical to band to servants — no waste by upsetting, peddled— gives no prizes — is a prize in itself ; and further I know, when a grocer tells me "this is just as good as" or "same as" Pearline^ he does not know the truth, or else is not telling it. Manufactured only by 308 JAMES PYLE, New York. Flower" Mrs. Sarah M. Black of Seneca, Mo., during the past two j^ears has been affected, with Neuralgia of the Head, Stomach and Womb, and writes; -'My food did not seem to strengthen me at all and my i tite was very variable. My face was yellow, my head dull, and I had such pains in my left side. In the morning when I got up I would have a flow of mucus in the mouth, and a fed, bitter taste. Sometimes my breath became short, /ind J had such flueejr, tumbling, palpitatinr sensations around the heart. Jach© all day under the shoulder blades^ in the left side, and down the back of my limbs, It seemed to be worse in the ire$, cold weather of Winter and Spring; and whenever the, speUs came cm, my &et and hands would turn eejtj* and I could get vsr sleep at all, i tried everywhere, and got no relie/before using August Flower "" " (Change came. Jth^sdone me a wonderful deal of good during the tiwe I nave taken it ^nd is work- score/" ea.n lessen URDEH by using j%& APO U 0.*Ibis &solid caike of-scourin^so&j* used for cle&ninf* purposes -• What would you give for a Friend who would take half your hard work off your shoulder* and do it ^vitJlo^i2 a murmur ? What would you give ta find an assistant in your Jiouscvvork that would keep your floors and walls clean, and your kitchen bvif/ht f and yet never yroiv vgly over the matter of hard work? Sapolfo is just such a friend and can be bought at all grocers. Best Cough. Medicine. Recommended by Physicians. Cures where all else fails. Pleasant and agreeable to the taste. Children take it without objection. By druggists. O ON SUM P 6 SPLENDID TRAINS6 V TO THE VIA THE "NUMBER 3:10 PJ SIX.' THE :30P,M. wtMITBO. ir-OK. ^ , Tourist Folder. V Showing Routes and Bates to «^ the Principal Eastern Bosorts, and ^ Complete Schedule of Trftinu. * A.J.SMITH.G.P.&T.A. G.K.WILBER.W.P.A. CLEVELAND. CHICAGO. THE 5^ ONLY TRUE IRON Wilt pnrlf* B^OOD, KIDNEYS, remove : disorder, build strcn/f tli. renew appetite, restore health and vigororyoutb. Pyppensla. Indigestion. tliattlroih<;5i Imrnlisolutely eradicated. |^_ Bind brightened, brain .. .'"i""' .^. -*^, power Increased, I I II IP A J * h ; bou«», nerves, nuu* I •I1ILV „ cles, receive uc\y force. I HBIir m Buffering from complaints pe- |,I|||lLll cullsrtotliclrsox, using It, find jTi. iTinl a sato. Bpeuily cure. Returns rose bloom ou cheeks, beautifies. Complexion. .Sold everywhere. AM genuine goods bew Hcsceut,* Send nsa cent etainp for 33.pa$« oa. HABTER UKDicrac co., «. toui., M* DONALD KENNEDY Of Roxbury, Mass,, says Kennedy's Medical Discovery cures Horrid Old Sores, Deep Seated Ulcers of £.Q ye.ars standing, Inward Tumors, and every disease of the skin, except Ttiunder Humor, Cancer that has Price, $1,50, £oW by m tfoe U* EDUCATIONAL. .^-w^^--«*^v-<^>^^v_^-^^>^-«wx-*, IIAUIP STUDY. Book-keeping,Penmanship,Arttb- IlljInC motic, Shorthand,etc., thoroughly taogh* jy mall. Trial leuons frro. Bryant ft Btrattw, DuBWo, S. 1^. 'MAKE THIS PABEBowlJ tta»»co«i««. 1AJFRITE to FREDERICK F. JODD. PR1 WEST ilDEBUSIBESS COLLEGE, 2'«. a W. Hnainon St.. CHICAGO, nor BOUi Annual AWMMMMM.. «rNAMB lUlfl PAMllercrj tim* jnrv J-CHIOAGO ATHENAEUM, People's Occupies Its own elegant new building. I national advantages. Fall term opens Sept. 1st. ough Business ana Shorthand School. Drawing, Mattoo- maUcs, Sciences, Elocution. Lfineuages. Splendid nasiam and Library. Add.E.I.GALVIS, BupU.fcr CH(«I University of Illinois. Courses in Agriculture; Engineering: Civil, Mining and Electrical i Arohitoot" re; Ch«mibtrj> Natural History; English and Science-, Latin an* Science; Ancient Languages; 1 hijoaophy and Pedagogy; Military Science; Art and Design; Rhetoric HIM* Oratory . Preparatory course of one year. Women a*- mitted. AddressltUUKNTOV USlVER8lfY,« ~ ~ 1 4 i tfSOU XH18 PAPEB.wij tliMjonimtft NO CHANGE OF CLTMATB KKEDHD." ASTH WE WXLXt SEND YOU TESTIMONY,, PBOM PEOPLE WHO LIVE NEAR YOU. CURED STAY CURED. P, HAROLD HAYES, M, BTTPPA1.O, K. T. L EWIS 9 98 % HE Tbe«t«»»«8tftnd tmnrtat made. Will make the fotei pcm turned Hard Soap to 80 minutes without toMn /. itiatbebe«* for cleansing waate pipes, **»- Infeoting SIUHS, efeaets, waste- ing botws, pawtej feeea, eta. PENSA. SALT MTG 00., Gen. Agts., PWtta,, Pa. - v - 1

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