The Pantagraph from Bloomington, Illinois on March 20, 2003 · Page 1
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The Pantagraph from Bloomington, Illinois · Page 1

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Bloomington, Illinois
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Thursday, March 20, 2003
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www.pantagraph.com THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2003 50 Cents GRAI D CONNECTING CE A'-, w . PANTA JL IL Ryan aide Fawell, campaign committee found guilty A3 Zta Cr predicts that Oscar will find 'Chicago9 is its kind of film I Get Out l)o ,3 O BKsl u KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS WASHINGTON, D.C. Overriding global protests and concerns of longtime allies, President Bush ordered the first preemptive war in modern American history, sending U.S. forces into Iraq and warning the American people Wednesday that his drive to topple Saddam Hussein could be long and difficult. Addressing the nation little more than two hours after the deadline he gave the Iraqi leader to flee, Bush said he had ordered air strikes at "selected targets of military importance to undermine Saddam Hussein's ability to wage war." The president offered no de tails, but he promised a "broad and concerted" drive to "disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger." "I assure you, Georae this will not be a ? campaign of Bush half measures, and we will accept no outcome but victory," he said. The strikes, a combination of cruise missiles and bombs launched by a stealth fighter-bomber, appeared limited. A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, would say only that the targets were "very senior" leaders. As to whether the strikes were successful, the official said, "It's too early to tell." Four hours later, though, Saddam, in a full military uniform with a black beret, appeared on Iraqi television to denounce Bush as the "criminal Junior Bush." "You are victorious with the will of God," Saddam told his fellow Iraqis, "and your enemies will be in humiliation and defeat, God willing." Poised for combat in the gulf were nearly 250,000 U.S. military personnel and another 40,000 British troops, backed by 1,000 warplanes and a fleets of aircraft carriers and other ships. Army and Marine divisions rolled into new formations in northeastern Kuwait, waiting orders to invade. . SEE IRAQ BACK PAGE INSIDE ABBY D7 CLASSIFIED C4 COMICS B8 CROSSWORD D7 GET OUT Dl. HOROSCOPE D7 LOTTERY A2 OBITUARIES A9 OPINION A10 SCOREBOARD B4 STOCKS - C2 Weather TODAY'S FORECAST Cloudy, a few t-storms; warm. High 62 Low 42 For complete weather information, see Today's Weather on the back page. Copyright 2003 The Pantagraph A Pulitzer newspaper III 4 sections, 48 pages '..,.'''..',"' Associated Press Tank crews from the Alpha Company 4th Battalion 64 Armor Regiment performed a "Seminole Indian war dance" Wednesday before convoying to a position near the Iraqi border. The commander of the 3rd Infantry Division, Maj. Gen. Buford Blount III, ordered his troops to reposition to locations near the border as President Bush's deadline for Saddam Hussein to leave Iraq approached. Troops' families pray, carry on By Mary Ann Ford PANTAGRAPH STAFF Rita McCarthy decided to paint the basement of her Morton home this week. "I'm staying busy and trying to stay grounded," she said. "I have a strong faith that things are going to work out." It's a similar story about 60 miles away "The business helps very much," said Amalia Jent-, owner of Soto's Place, a Clinton restaurant. "Everyone comes in and asks about (my son). ... I pray a lot for him and everybody else." McCarthy's husband and Jent's son are among U.S. troops in Kuwait. Both men have been there since mid-February Maj. Michael McCarthy is a combat engineer with Company C 6th Engineer Support Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. David Campos Jr. is a private first class in the U.S. Army "My emotions are higher," said Rita McCarthy of the war looming Wednesday afternoon. "But I don't spend my time worrying." SEE FAMILIES BACK PAGE The PantacjraphSTEPHANIE OBEP. LANDER Claire McCarthy, 5, far left, cheered during a card game as her siblings, clockwise from left, Maggie, 9; Will, 7; and her mother, Rita, played at their Morton home Wednesday night. McCarthy, whose husband Michael is a combat engineer, said she wouldn't be watching the news Wednesday night. Veterans speak Men and women who speak from experience offer views on the war. Page A6 Talking to children Tips on how to help kids understand and cope with what's happening. Page A6 How to help From prayers to parcels how you can help soldiers and their families. PageA6 End of the road Fight against terrorists worldwide leads up to confrontation with Iraq Page A7 Iraq at a glance A look at the history of Iraq and Saddam Hussein's bloody rise to power. Page A8 Soldier leaves wife parting gift By Mary Ann Ford PANTAGRAPH STAFF BLOOMINGTON Army Major Jack Howard was training in Texas when he learned his reserve unit was being activated in two days. His orders would keep him from home for at least a year, and there was little time to prepare for much of anything let alone his 10th wedding anniversary on July 31. His wife Linda packed up 3-year-old son Zachary and drove from Bloomington to St. Louis to meet his airplane. They had five days together before his Belleville-based 458th TC Detachment unit left for Fort Knox, Ky , on Valentine's Day "We joked about our anniversary," said Linda, who was making him a quilt. "I told him I'd put it aside until he got home it would be our 11th anniversary quilt. He told me not to expect much, or anything. I respected that. He had other things going on." Nothing more was said until Tues-, day, when Jack called Linda from Fort Knox and told her to visit their jeweler, Ken Criser, at William Marken Jewelers, 1520 E. College Ave., Normal. "When I walked in, Ken started to grin, put a box on the counter and said, 'Happy anniversary,'" Linda said. The ring inside had a diamond and two sapphires, representing Sapphire Valley, N.C., where Linda and Jack spent their honeymoon. "I was shocked and cried," said Linda. "I'm so blessed to have a wonderful, thoughtful husband. He has so much to worry about ... and he took the time to organize this. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it." Little did she know what it took to pull off the surprise. SEE GIFT BACK PAGE i ? J H-i ' I .T- hIS7 v l 1 ( The PantaqraphSTEPHANIE OBERLANDER Linda Howard of Bloomington held up the anniversary ring her husband, Jack Howard, arranged to have made for her after he was sent to Fort Knox. V v

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