Daily Independent Journal from San Rafael, California on November 15, 1966 · Page 24
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Daily Independent Journal from San Rafael, California · Page 24

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San Rafael, California
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Tuesday, November 15, 1966
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Page 24
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I i 21 3nbtptt&tnt'3atxrtud. Tues., Nov. 15, 1966 JM MURRAY U. S. Tennis Just Too Far Behind The Times Well, I see where the Little Orphan Annie of American sports, the Sick Child or Organized Athletics, has been dumped on the doorstep again with its formula pinned to its bib. . . American tennis has reached a new low. Now we're losing the interzone Finals to South American nobodies. Pretty soon, we won't be able to warm up a banana republic's squad. Australia will beat us without taking the racquet - presses off. THE TROUBLE with tennis is, it's as anachronistic as George III. It adheres to a code of behavior as outmoded as Louis XIV's court. It is as undemocratic as the House of Lords. They should play the game in powdered wigs. It is the last survival of a cul ture that holds tnere is something despicable about working for a living, about taking money for playing a game welL It is a holdover from the days when great painters painted only for wealthy, libertinous patrons, when people believed in dragons and the divine right of kings, and thought the earth was flat. It is the only major game which still makes professionals use the tradesmen's entrance. i sr. s v ' - t IT IS STAGNATING because it operates under i code that robs its practitioners of the first thing any great athlete has to have to perform well pride. It, perforce, makes petulant, spoiled brats out of its members or they flee to the professional ranks where they can at least walk the streets as honest workmen, tot quasi - charity cases. Any activity where you have to get paid off in the darkr - and in unmarked cash demeans a man. A great athlete should never be made to feel like a kidnapper getting a ransom through a crack in the fence. Open tournaments are only part of the answer. The professional game should be THE game. In today's society, no man should have to go through life as a ward of the rich. Jack Benny is a multi - millionaire, not a court jester. Only tennis wears the cap and bells and turned - up shoes. Football players no longer play for cups and medals. They play for half of Texas. Prizefighters are no longer trained pets of earls and dukes. They own castles of their own. AMATEUR TENNIS, like amateur anything in a society where man is given his own dignity, should be played at high school, college and Olympic level. Let the Davis Cup be an Olympic event. Let the World Cup be a pro event. You all know what our impolite society's phrase for the "amateur" tennis player is, surely? "Tennis bum." No other sport gets that accolade of derision. It is taken for granted he cannot take his place among legitimate wage earners. He lives at the end of a short chain. He is beholden. Even his wife has to learn to curtsey. THE GAME AT the amateur level belongs In Bel - Air back yards, Shaker Heights Estates, Yale, Harvard, or UCLA. Once a man is grown, he should be able to take his game to the marketplace like a Mickey Mantle, Joe Namath, Gale Sav ers or Jose Torres. Tennis is not a game which should be played if you can afford it. It should be a game to be played if IT can afford YOU. Why should Joe Namath have a penthouse with a fur rug on the floor and be able to boast about it in print, while a tennis player, who is at least as con siderable an athlete, has to hide the way he pays his phone bill, or apologize for not taking a bus o tournaments? THE GAME CANNOT strug gle out of its bush - league strait jacket because of its semi - monarchal framework. The Davis Gp Challenge Round has resulted in a series of ho - hum inals , featuring spectacular i mis - matches between Australia and Italy, or Australia and Spain, lately, because U.S. kids have to become professionals at something before they reach their tennis maturity. Either professional stock brokers or truck salesmen or professional tennis players. Next time around. America will not even make it as far as Brazil. Open tournaments are a start at correction. Golf has a 50 - year head start, but tennis still has not left the starting blocks in an effort to catch up. I hate to see a great sport descend to the level of tiddledy - winks because it has not yet comprehended a 130 - year - old fact of life the Industrial Revolution. To say nothing of the American Revolution. Mist a kes Penalties Hurt 1 m arm I ars "It just wasn't our night to win." , ... i College of Marin football coach Dick Read was musing over the remains of a 12 - 6 setback at the hands of league - leading Shasta College last week, knocking the Tars out of Golden Valley Conference contention. "We played very well," Read said. "We got inside their 29 five times but we'd either make a mistake or there would be a 15 - yard penalty. In that kind of mud, you just don't make up that yardage." Passing, or the lack of it, also played a part in the loss. "Our passing was off," Read said. "We completed 5 of 19. That's not too good." In other Golden Valley games last week, Napa ended a four - game streak of frustration by downing Santa Rosa, 15 - 7, leaving Santa Rosa winless in eight outings. Sierra stopped Yuba 24 - 12, setting up a big showdown between the loop's two unbeat - ens, Sierra and Shasta, at Redding Saturday. The Tars are 2 - 2 in league play and are assured of at least a tie for third place. The Tars face their annual Little Big Game against Santa ? - ' ' I 'i t i Rosa at Santa Rosa Friday and it may be a tough one. "We may have trouble," Read said. "The boys are pretty down after that last one. They played well enough to win but they didn't." Read figures that Santa Rosa, despite its unbelievable 0 - 8 record, will be itching and then some. "Nobody has walked' over them yet," Read said. "They've lost some close ones and my teams have never beaten them." "We'll just have two work and get back on the right track," he said. . , . 0 The Tars have not beaten Santa Rosa since 1947, with a 12 - year break in the series from 1950 to 1962.; . M '" .; :., t ' "f . - ' Tams Woodward And Biber Drake's Mauer Win Individual Grid Titles It's final. All the little numbers and fig ures have been added up for the final statistics in four individual categories and six team categories over six games in the Marin County Athletic League football season. Drake's Tom Mauer and Tamalpais' Steve Woodward and Mike Biber hauled off the individual titles while Drake fin ished on top in three team categories, Tamalpais in two and San Rafael in one. Mauer climaxed a steady season performance by nabbing the MCAL rushing title with 539 yards on 100 carries, finishing agead of Tam junior Mike Fowler by 87 yards. Terra Linda halfback Paul Lee was third with 423 yards followed by Marin Catholic junior Jim Finnegan with 279 yards and Larry Bres - nan of Novato with 260 yards. Tam quarterback Steve Wood ward, with a big boost from a 32 for 43 day against Novato, took the passing honors, based on percentage of completions. Woodward, who took over for injured quarterback Don Mack in in Tam s tnird game, com pleted 90 of 160 passes to edge San Rafael's Bill Joost, who completed 85 of 157 passes. The yardage duel stood at 1,366 for Pacific Coach, Stanford, San Jose Stars Honored Terra Linda Heads Marin All - Stars Continued from page 25 15 TDs for the season and San Rafael's Sam Crowell who caught 50 passes for 844 yards, took the two offensive end spots. , Terra Linda's opportunistic, rugged defenders dominated the defensive team, landing five on the team. In addition to Kilby and Sherbert, defensive and Greg Oczkus, 234 - pound tackle Tom Heacox, and defensive halfback Paul Taylor also made the first team. Here's the way the all - league backfield shapes up statistically for nine games: Joost completed 117 of 242 passes for 1,413 yards and 11 touchdowns and ran for 173 yards, scored five touchdowns for 30 points. Fowler rushed for 597 yards for a 5.1 average and scored seven touchdowns and two extra points for 44 points. In league play, he was runnerup to Mauer, Lee rushed for 608 yards, best in the league for the season and scored six touchdowns for 36 points. Finnegan rushed for 468 yards, caught 16 passes for 197 yards and scored 30 of Marin Catholic's 47 points. Rounding out the offensive line were San Rafael guard Mike Rosso and Tamalpais guard Art Langhoff and Marin Catholic center Rich Woodall. Barry Brink, Tarn's steady two - way tackle was a first team defensive choice as were teammates Phil Simpson at linebacker and Scott Laurie at defensive halfback. Rusty Poole of Redwood filled the remaining linebacker spot. BERKELEY (AP) - University of the Pacific's new football coach Doug Scovil, Stanford's defensive tackle Monty Mohr - man and San Jose's bullseye passer Danny Holman lead the honors parade of the Northern California Football Writers Assn. Scovil, the 37 - year - old former UOP quarterback, brought the Tigers out of the football depths with a 4 - 5 record to date and was voted the area's coach - of - the - year for his first season. Mohrman, a 210 - pound senior from Boise, Idaho, was voted top lineman while Holman, in his first season at San Jose, was named the outstanding back. The 160 - pound quarterback, a junior, hails from Carmel. ; Awards will be made by the Writers on Nov. 28 at the Palo Alto Club banquet in Palo Alto. Nominees among the linemen, in addition to Mohrman, were John Beasley, California end; Bob Albertazzi, USF guard; g GET READY a B FOR IT! 3 B 1 01 8 "B" St. 9 Q San Rafael H B IS HAVING A B BIRTHDAY H B : Starting Soon H Dave Rickerd, Hayward State linebacker; Greg Kolar, Santa Clara linebacker; Terry Oakes, San Francisco State defensive tackle; Steve Cox, San Jose State end and John Quaccia, UOP linebacker. The backs nominated included four who played on defense and four on offense. California nominated 'Jerry Bradley as a back, a position he plays as the safetyman for returning kicks although on offense he goes at split end. Stanford nominated defensive back John Guillory and Hayward also named a defensive back, Curtis Reed. Linebacker Rudy Lapera was nominated by San Francisco State. . Offensive backs named, in addition to Holman, were Bob Lee, UOP quarterback; Phil Wanlin, USF quarterback and Tom Kennedy, Santa Clara fullback. , ; Women Golfers In Turkey Tourney The Indian Valley Business Women's Golf Club held a Turkey Shoot Tournament at In dian Valley golf course last Saturday. - . The results: j Miss Audrey Millins, 97 - 23 - 74; Mesdames Thomas Gibson, 103 - 29 - 74; Joseph Mestas, 101 - 25 - 76; Carl Forsman, 104 - 26 - 78; Robert Keller, 104 - 25 - 79; Thomas Washington, 109 - 28 - 81; and Miss Chris Griffin, 104 - 23 - 81. Little League Meet The Larkspur - Corte Madera Twin Cities Little League will hold a meeting tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. at the Larkspur firehouse to elect board of directors for 1967. MARIN ROD AND GUN CLUB MEETING NIGHT Friday, November 1 8th 8:00 P.M. This is Election Night for your 1967 Officers - Come out and support your club. A picture "THE RESTLESS RIVER" , will be shown. Refreshments served and a Turkey Drawing will be held. Don't forget the mmbrs Children's Christmas Part Saturday, December 1 Oth atoor clubhouse 700 PM. CARTOONS - SANTA CLAUS - REFRESHMENTS FINAL MARIN LEAGUE FOOTBALL STATISTICS FINAL LEAGUE STATISTICS INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS Rushing (50 yds. or more) TCB YDS. AVG. TD. zMauer (D ..10O 639 5.4 6 Fowler (T) .... 91 452 5.0 5 zLee (TL) 97 423 4.4 4 Fin'g'n (MC) 61 279 4.6 2 Bresnan N) 73 260 3.6 1 zSparks (T) .... 50 231 4.6 2 Murphy (R) .. 59 221 3.7 0 Brown (D) .... 50 179 3.6 2 zPerachiTI (N) 39 175 4.5 3 Stone D) 48 175 3.6 4 zHickerson (D) 41 172 4.2 1 Nelson (SR) 46 161 3.5 0 zAdams (T) .... 31 142 4.6 2 zBowman (TL) 51 139 .2.7 5 xR. Jones (TL) 44 137 3.1 0 Biaeini (R) ... 31 132 4.3 0 zJoost (SR .... 15 128 2.5 5 Loomis (SR) 25 123 4.9 0 zTobiason (R) 27 104 3.8 1 Rowland (SR) 21 100 4.8 0 K.Johns'n (R) 28 92 3.3 0 zWalker (T) .... 15 90 6.0 2 zTaylor (TL) .. 17 87 5.1 1 zR.Poole (R) 22 68 3.1 0 zMcNeil (TL).. 11 65 5.9 0 zMazzoni (N) 19 57 3.0 0 Passing (listed in order of percentage completed) (15 attempts or more) att. comp. yds. int. td. zWdwrd T) 160 z Joost (SR) 157 zFain (N) ... 122 zBwmn (TL) 51 zlacopi (D) ..19 Dillon (N) ..20 Stone (D .... 84 Edson (TL).. 16 Fouts (MC) 142 zWilson (R) ... 72 zCarney (MC)26 Peters (R) .. 25 90 1366 8 85 932 10 985 10 270 4 216 O 90 1 620 4 103 4 569 9 387 11 65 3 34 5 61 22 8 8 31 6 51 25 7 4 10 8 6 1 4 1 8 0 1 3 0 0 TEAM STATISTICS Offensive Rushing Team Drake Terra Linda Tamalpais Redwood San Rafael . record yds. av (5 - 1) (5 - 1) (4 - 1 - 1) (1 - 5) (3 - 2 - 1) 1097 923 857 684 559 528 355 183 154 143 114 93 88 59 Pass Receiving (10 reed, or more) No. yds. avg. td. xBiber (T .. 43 732 zCrowell (SR) 33 528 zG.Dinkel (N) 29 503 zWidmer (SR) 25 215 zPerach'ti (N) 22 369 Fin'g'n (MC) 15 186 zStein (D ...... 13 308 zSchal'h (MC) 13 117 zReiter (T .... 11 220 zCooper (R) . 11 187 Alvarado (D) 10 148 zAdams (T).... 10 123 Fowler (T).... 10 121 zSparks (T) 10 103 Scoring (12 points or more) 17.0 16.0 20.7 8.6 16.8 124 23.7 9.0 20.0 17.0 14.8 12.3 2. 10.3 9 4 4 2 2 1$ 4 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 . ; td. pat pts. zBiber (T) . 9 0 54 zMauer (D) 7 - 2 44 Fowler (T) : 5 2 ' 32 zBowman (TL) ...... 5 O 30 ZJoost (SR) ... 5' d O 30 zPerachiotti (N) .... 5 O 30 Brown (D) 4 2 26 zStein (D) .... ..... 4 2 26 zCrowell (SR) 4 O 24 zDinkel (N) 4 0 24 zLee (TL) 4 0 24 Stone (D) 4 0 24 zAdams (T) . .... 3 0 18 Finnegan (MC) .... 3 0 18 zHicekrson (D) 2 3 15 zSparks (T) 2 2 14 zwidmer (SR) .... ... 2 1 13 Gaffney (D) 2 0 12 zOtteson (R) 2 0 12 zTaylor (TL) 2 0 12 zWalker (T) 2 0 12 z Denotes Senior Novato (2 - 4) Marin Catholic (0 - 6) Passing yds. avg. Tamalpais 1441 240 Novato 1075 179 San Rafael 940 157 Drake M 887 148 Marin Catholic 649 108 Redwood , 466 78 Terra Linda 419 70 Total Net Yards yds. avg. Tamalpais 2298 383 Drake 1984 331 Novato 1603 267 San Rafael 1499 250 Terra Linda 1342 224 Redwood 1150 192 Marin Catholic 1004 167 Defense Rushing Allowed yds. avg. Drake 264 44 Terra Linda , 490 82 Tamalpais ....j . . 576 96 Redwood 761 127 San Rafael 809 135 Novato 919 153 Marin Catholic 1194 199 Passing Allowed yds. avg. San Rafael 587 98 Terra Linda 731 122 Tamalpais 820 137 Novato 870 145 Drake 876 150 Redwood 900 150 Marin Catholic :. 1102 .' 184 Total Yards Allowed yds. avg. Drake 1140 190 Terra Linda 1221 204 Tamalpais 1396 233 San Rafael 1396 233 Redwood 1661 277 Novato 1789 298 Marin Catholic 2296 383 Ski Show Opens In San Francisco This Weekend Ski fans attending the fourth annual California Ski and Winter Sports Show Nov. 17 - 20 at Masonic Auditorium, San Francisco, will get a preview of the new Warren Miller film, "The Wild Wonderful World of Skiing." The film features outstanding acrobatics of Art Furrer, a lieutenant in the Swiss Mountain Troops. . . . The film will be shown continuously during the show; it also covers such things as ski etiquette, observance of basic rules of courtesy and safety, all of which enhance enjoyment and reduce accidents. OPEN! FRIDAY, NOV. 11th STAN'S at NOVATO Diablo at S. Novato Blvd. Hours: 9:30 AM. till 6 P.M. Thursdays till 9 P.M. TANS For SPORTS : ftnCharg ChrgK lankAmoricanl For leisurely shopping, courteous, knowledgeable service, and ell our trusted and fam6us brands, shop STAN'S for SPORTS! Equipment and Apparel for All Sports Ski Specialists Sales Repairs Rentals Skin Diving Classes Tent Rentals LOTS OF FREE PARKING AIR CONDITIONED Woodward and 932 for Joost. naroia tam ot IN ova to was the only other MCAL quarter back to complete half his passes with an even 50 per cent on 61 completions in 122 attempts for 985 yards. Chris B o w m a n of Terra Linda was fourth on 22 of 51 and Tony Iacopi who hadn't even played quarterback all year, had a big day against Marin Catholic, completing 8 of 19 passes earning him fifth place. Biber, Tarn's super end, took two individual titles, netting the pass receiving honors with 43 catches for 732 yards and the scoring title with 9 touchdowns for 54 points. In receiving, Biber topped San Rafael's Sam Crowell who had 33 catches for 528 yards. Crowell was followed by Novato's Gary Dinkel with 29 catches for 503 yards, San Rafael's Roger Wid - mer with 25 c a t c h e s for 215 yards and Prank Perachiotti of Novato with 22 catches for 369 yards. Mauer finished second in soring with seven touchdowns and two extra points for 44 points, followed by Fowler with 32 points and Bowman. Joost and Perachiotti with 30 points. Despite the late season push by Drake, Tam hung on to its total offense lead by finishing tops in passing and third in rushing. Drake took the rushing title with 1,097 yards for a 183 - yard average followed by Terra Linda and Tam. Tarn's 1,441 passing yards topped Novato's 1,075. San Rafael was third in passing. Drake finished! second in total offense, followed by Novato. Although Terra Linda is considered by many to be the best defensive team in the 1 1 a g u e , the Trojans don't rate the honor statistically. Drake, which had the best defense against rushing, allowing just 44 yards a game, took the over - all defensive title by 81 yards over Terra Linda. San Rafael had the best pass defense, allowing just 98 yards a game passing in what has been a big passing year. Terra Linda was second In pass and rush defense, both times followed by Tam, and in overall defense. Tam and San Rafael tied for third in overall defense. ANOTHER ROMP FOR WARRIORS SAN FRANCISCO , (AP) - Rick Barry's sophomore jinx seems only to have hexed the other clubs in the National Bas ketball Assn. The slender blond forward was the NBA Rookie - of - the - Year last season for the San Francisco Warriors. This season, the Miami graduate is the leading scorer in the league. His 44 points last night helped both his average and the Warriors, who defeated the Detroit Pistons 115 - 104 for their fifth straight victory in the only NBA game of the night. Barry hit 17 of 30 from the floor and all 10 of his free throw attempts. He also took 11 rebounds and led both teams with six assists. On Sunday, he hit 19 of 26 from the field and seven of eight from the line against Detroit. What Barry hasn't done this campaign to get the Warriors Novato Man Nominated For Award Carl Jensen, 21 - year - old dis tance runner from Novato, was one of the nominees in the Pacific Assn. of the Amateur Athletic Union balloting for representing this area in the Sullivan Award competition. He was one of 16 athletes who had a chance for the Pacific Assn. nomination, which was won by Don Schollander, star swimmer for the Santa Clara Club. Schollander won the Sullivan award as the nation's top amateur athlete after he won four gold medals in the Olympics in 1964. Winner of the Sullivan Award is decided from among the nominees from the various associations within the AAU and no athlete has won it twice. Jensen, who will leave for active duty in the Army next month, is temporarily working with the Novato Parks and Recreation Department. A past president and still a number of the Marin Athletic Club, he is a graduate of Novato High School and attended College of Marin and SontfKa State College. 'into first place in the Western Division, center Nate Thurmond has. :, , , vf Thurmond scored 20 points and pulled down 30 rebounds. More importantly, he kept thet Pistons outside by blocking 15 ? of their close - in shots; 'V.' The Warriors moved ahead to!;: stay after the first five minutes of the game and were seriously i challenged only once more. The Pistons moved to 85 - 81 three minutes into the fourth quarter: But Barry scored six and Thurmond smashed through a dunk shot for eight points without an answer as the Warriors rolled to their sixth without a loss this season at home. DETROIT o s $ 4 - 4 0 - 0 t - 7 2 - 4 0 - 0 1 - 2 0 - 0 T 17 Barry 14 Httzel 4 Th'rm'nd 18 Attles 10 Ntum'n 16 Mesch'y 4 C.Let 15 Kins .. 2 DeB'c'o Scott Strt'd'r Miles B'A'lt Bing Vaughn Rted Harding Tot.l 40 24 - 32 104 Totals 43 20 - 31113 Detroit 19 22 34 29104 San Pranclica 21 20 37 31115 Fouled out San Francisco, Attles. Total fouls Detroit 27, San Francisco 26. Attendance 2.633. FRANCISCO OFT 17 10 - 1014 4 4 - 5 12 0 2 - 4 20 0 1 - 1 1 5 6 - 1016 4 $ - 7 3 1 0 - 0 2 1 - 1 7 Mill Valley Team Wins Cage Debut Mill Valley Boys Club, Golden Gate Baptist Seminary and Marin Kelly were opening night winners in the San Rafael Recreation Department's Adult Bas - . ketball League last night. Mill Valley, paced by Brad Bush's 21 points downed Stop N Go Market, 68 - 52, in A Division play. In C - l division play, Golden Gate got a 21 - point performance from Gene Kishen to down Redmon Raiders, 59 - 39. Marin Kelly, helped by James" Clark's 18 points, stopped Dan Coleman Associates, 56 - 38 in C - 2 play. PRO BASKETBALL ; By Associated Press . Eastern Division Wen Lest Fct. Behind Philadelphia 11 l .917 Boston 10 2 .133 it New York 8 . 6 .571 4 , Cincinnati ..... 5 7 .417 4 Baltimore 2 13 .133 lO'i Western Division San Francisco 10 6 .423 St. Louis 6 5 .545 W Chicago . 7 10 .412 3V4 Detroit : 6 ' 9 .400 3' Los Angeles 4 10 .206 5 Monday's Result ' ; i San Francisco 115, Detroit 104 Today's Games Philadelphia at New York Chicago at St. Louis o 5 lUtmii - T Mt WtUNtMJAY NlliHI 0 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 - 7 7 KTIM MYSTERY SHOPPER AND WIN A PRIZE! ! ! WEDNESDAY NIGHT MYSTERY SHOPPER RULES: 1. Every adult is eligible to win except San Rafael merchants and ..." employees Or members of their families. Identifier must be at least 20 years of age. 2. Clues to Wednesday Mystery Shopper's identity will be broadcast on KTIM all day Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 3. To win the merchandise trdr$, $15 - $10 - 10, the Mystery Shop - per must be asked this question: "Are you the KTIM Mystery Shop: . - .per?";' - - 'i' - - ';"" - . - . . - : , - : - ; - ,,f; . - v - I .s 4. The first three people to correctly identify tho KTIM Mystery $hop - v per will each recerv a Gift Certificate. , ; (The first 4 Wednesdays, a Surprise Bonus Prize also) 5. The Mystery Shopper will appear in downtown Fourth Street stores starting at 7 P.M. each Wednesday night. " ; "Only Sunshine Covers Marin Better Than KTIM 1 51 0 KTIM FM 100.9" 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 e ; 7 7 7 r 3

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