Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on August 7, 1973 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Galesburg, Illinois
Issue Date:
Tuesday, August 7, 1973
Page:
Page 6
Start Free Trial
Cancel

6 <3o!§sburg ,Refljgter-Mgjj, .Golesburg, ,1.11. Tuesday, Aug. 7, 1973 What Exercise Is Best? Dr. Lamb By LAWRENCE LAMB, M.t). Dear Dr. Ltmb — You often recommend exercise and proper diet. It is not difficult to find samples of adequate diets and proper foods to eat for good health, but what about quality and quantity of good exercise? Do you advocate exercise routines such as the publicized Royal Canadian Air Force exercise plan of 11 minutes a day, or do you consider this amount to be insufficient? What distances of walking would you recommend for optimum benefits at what ages? Dear Reader — The RCAF exercise plan (Five BX Plan for Men or Ten BX Plan for Women) has many attractive fea tures. Almost anyone can crowd its short duration of exercise into a busy schedule. The grad ual Increase in the level of activity is important. Any exer cise program should begin at i low level and be gradually increased to the desired level to maintain one's physical fitness. Crash programs and overdoing it are the usual causes of trouble during exercise programs. Some doctors have criticized the back arching and bending and twisting exercises in the RCAF plan. Individuals who have any spine problems should have a careful examination before engaging in these types of exercises. I am not enthusiastic about the RCAF plan's gradual increase in the speed of exercising. I prefer to have people exercise at a low or moderate level well below their maximum capacity, and then sustain this level of exercise for longer periods of time as their fitness is developed. It's better to walk three miles, if you can, than run in place at a rapid rate for one to five minutes. Simple Walking For the general public at all ages, I recommend simple walking. Almost everyone in reasonably good health can walk 10 or 15 minutes at a comfortable rate. The walking period can be increased gradually. Most people should try to maintain a level of one-and-a-half miles a day for a minimal level — done daily without fail. Before progressing to other exercises, one should gradually develop the ability to walk three miles in one hour. It may require several weeks to acquire this level of fitness. Individuals who can't achieve this level without difficulty should not engage in anything more strenuous without a medical evaluation. Individuals who tolerate this amount of exercise well can, if they wish, begin a jogging or running program in the middle of such an exercise effort. Count Steps About halfway through a 30- minute walk, they may jog 100 steps counting when the left foot hits the ground. The number of steps can then be increased at a slow rate, say 10 steps a day until gradually the running or jogging program may reach as high as 15 minutes, or in young healthy people may be extended. In this way, the amount of exercise can be increased gradually and safely. Don't try to jog or run too fast. Jog within a rate of 50 to 100 steps a minute, counting as one step each time the left foot hits the ground or surface. Most of the people who get into trouble try to set speed records or compete against themselves or someone else. The increased speed can push the work of the heart beyond the safe level. (Newspaper Enterprise Assn.) Send your questions to Dr. Lamb, in care of this newspaper, P.O. Box 1551, Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019. For a copy of Dr. Lamb's booklet on losing weight, send 50 cents to the same address and ask for "Losing Weight" booklet. Your Horoscope Price Signed SAN ANTONIO (UPI) - The San Antonio Spurs announced Monday that they had signed free agent George Price of Colorado State University to an ABA contract. Price, a 6-foot-3 guard, was drafted by the Utah Stars last season. He led Colorado State in scoring his senior year with a 19.4 average. By FRANCES DRAKE Look in the section in which your birthday comes and find whet your outlook is, according to the stars. FOR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST i, 1*73 March 21 to April 21 (Aries) —Neither be extravagant in an effort to impress others nor fell for any ostenttousness displayed for your benefit. Concentrate on what 's REAL and dependable. April 21 to May 21 (Taurus) —Do not overtax yourself, and do avoid anxiety. If you are doing your very best, both in job and personal matters, it will prove rewarding enough. May 22 to June 21 (Gemini) —Planetary influences point to new interests. Make sure you are ready for them—but without slighting current obligations. Don't let "moods" cause misunderstandings. Jane 22 to July 23 (Cancer) —Lunar influences now stimulate your business acumen and gcod timing. There will be many fringe benefits for those ready to expend a little added effort July 24 to Aug. 23 (Leo) To put your ideas across and gain the acceptance you wash, you may have to lean backwards in some areas. So—out witb rigidity and inflexibility! Aug. 24 to Sept. 23 (Virgo)— Fine stellar influences. With imkiative and enterprise, more than usual can be achieved. Day will definitely respond to ambitious moves. If you've something on your Sept. 24 to Oct. 23 (Libra)mind, career-wise, now 's the time to speak up. Superiors should be receptive to new ideas —logically presented. Oct. 24 to Nov. 22 (Scorpio) —A hectic working day indicated. Determine to remain calm under all circumstances. Don 't "fly off the handle" with associates. Nov. 23 to Dec. 21 (Sagittarius) — Indications of a good financial break. It may come in the form of dividends from a shrewd investment or repay menit of a loan long since forgotten. Dec. 22 to Jan. 20 (Capricorn) —Some pleasing surprises in store. You may find, quite unex peotedly, that a hobby or vacation has money-making potential. Jan. 21 to Feb. 19 (Aquarius) —You have considerable freedom of movement now. Best used, it can help to further either personal or creative objectives. i Gray Reports He Gat But 'No Questions At By WESLEY G, PIPPERT WASHINGTON (UPI) - L. Patrick Gray HI and John N. Mitchell agree on at least one point in their Senate testimony —that President Nixon did not ask questions about the Watergate case in the weeks following the break-in. Gray, former acting director of the FBI, testified Monday that his conversation with Nixon in early July, 1972, was "adequate to put him on notice that members of the White House staff were using the FBI and the CIA" to confuse the Watergate investigation. Gray said that after weeks passed and Nixon asked no questions, he concluded that he and Lt. Gen. Vernon A. Walters, deputy director of the CIA, had been "alarmists." On July 12, Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., D-N.C, chairman of the Senate Watergate committee, asked Mitchell, the former attorney general and Nixon campaign director, if the President at any time "asked what you knew about Water- i gate." He Knew "Very Little" "Not after that first discussion that we had on the telephone, I believe it was on June 20," Mitchell replied. He added that at the time of the call, three days after the break- in, he knew "very little" about the case. Both Gray and Mitchell acknowledged that they did not press information about Watergate upon Nixon. Gray said that one just does not "go bang on the door of the chief executive" and furthermore "I HOT DOGS SPECIAL TUE. & WED. CONEY DOGS BURGER CHAMP 2100 E. MAIN ST. PH. 343-1009 didn't feel I had enough to go on." Mitchell testified that he did not tell Nixon because the President would have "lowered the boom" and thus jeopardized his re-election campaign. Gray said that Nixon had called him on July 6 to congratulate him on the handling of an airline hijacking. He said he then "blurted out" the following: "I told the President that 'Dick Walters and I feel that people on your staff are trying to mortally wound you, by using the FBI and the CIA and confusing the question of whether the CIA was interested in or not interested in the people the FBI wished to interview." Told to Continue He said Nixon told him to continue his vigorous and thorough investigation. The committee is trying to end the first round of its nationally televised hearings by Wednesday. In its 11 weeks of hearings, the committee has heard 36 witnesses in its investigation of the bugging and break-in at the Democratic national offices at the Watergate complex June 17, 1972. If Nixon did not ask questions, as Gray testified, the FBI agents did not ask the right questions or enough questions, the committee's minority counsel, Fred D. Thompson, charged Monday. . As Gray completed his second day on the stand, Thompson sharply challenged the former acting director's claim that the FBI did a "terrific" job on Watergate. Thompson, a former federal prosecutor of moonshiners in Tennessee, told Gray that, "it doesn't really matter" how many interviews have been conducted or agents involved "if the job is not done." He noted that the FBI Investigation implicated only seven low* echelon conspirators. Cannot Understand Thompson said he could not understand why White House chief of staff H. R. Haldeman was not interviewed; why chief, domestic affairs adviser John D. Ehrlichman was interviewed only "very" early in the investigation; why Gordon C. Strachan, Haldeman's' political aide, was interviewed only about campaign dirty tricks, why deputy campaign director Jeb Stuart Magruder was interviewed only about campaign finances. "We did not know —" Gray started to say. "You did not ask," Thompson cut him off. Gray, who in the month of April saw his nomination withdrawn and then resigned even as acting director, now practices law in New London, Conn. He served 26 years in the Navy, some of them as a submarine commander, and he retired as a captain. ... In the service of my country I withstood hours and hours of depth-charging, shelling bombing—but I never expected to run into a Watergate in the service of the President of the United States," Gray said. "And I ran into a buzz saw, obviously." Sugaring is one of America's oldest industries. Colonists learned the art from the Indians who collected sap in hollowed out logs and steamed away the water by dropping in hot stones. ,1 .1*'"" ! * V '*"'' .lliSlH...!**' 1111 """""""'""" Gathers Up Papers L. Patrick Gray, former acting FBI director, collects his files after the end of his testimony Monday before the Senate Watergate committee. Gray disputed President Nixon's public statments concerning presidential questions and instructions to him about the FBI investigation of the Watergate affair. UNIFAX Officials Agre& < Governor's Help Is Needed To Solve Transit Problems Brandish Pencils Sen. Howard Baker, R-Tenn., left vice chairman of the Senate committee investigating the Watergate affair and Sen. Sam Ervin, D-N. C, right, brandishes pencils during questioning Monday of former acting FBI director L. Patrick Gray. UNIFAX WEDNESDAY IS KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN DAY YOUR CHOICE OF: Colonel Sander's Original Recipe WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPECIAL FAMILY NIGHT RIB-EYE M.89 French Fries or Baked, Tossed Salad Kitchen Open 5 P.M. KNOTTY PINE TAP Plus Tox WATAGA, ILL. 375-9918 or Our New Extra Crispy Chicken Regular Dinner 3 Pieces of Chicken, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Cole Slew A 1 Roll No Substitutes NOW 1.30 Offer Good At Both Locations Ktntudty fried #ki*k«$ COCKTAIL HOUR MONDAYS THROUGH THURSDAYS 3 P.M. — 6:30 P.M. ALL MIXED DRINKS 50c Compllmtniary Hot fc Cold Hort-d'oauvtri SAMMY ROSE at the Piano Nightly 8:30-12:30 JIM'S STEAK HOUSE 951 N. HENDERSON ST. CHICAGO (UPI) - Mayor Richard J. Daley and state legislative leaders discussed northeast Illinois' mass transit problems for two hours Monday and (agreed on one point — no solution will be reached without? Gov. Daniel Walker. "We'ne hoping the next meeting will be more productive," the mayor said. "We're always hopeful tomorrow will be better than today." Daley said a regional transit authority for the state's six northeast counties could be set up "much easier and much more rapidly" if Waflker would attend sessions with other political leaders. Walker declined to attend the Monday session and another held last month. He has called for a series of nine public hearings to be held in Chicago and suburbs later this month, and said meetings among state leaders before that would be "premature." House Speaker W. Robert Blair, R-Park Forest, said the hearings would simply repeat those held earlier this year by the Illinois Transportation Study Commission, and he termed Walker's absence a "cop out." "I think if nothing else he should be here to clarify the inconsistent positions he has taken so far on this problem," Blair said. Those attending Monday's i meeting besides Blair and Daley were Senate President William Harris, R-Pontiac; Senate Minority Leader Cecil Partee, D-Chioago; House Minority Leader Clyde Choate, D-Anna, and Assistant House Minority Leader Genafld Shea, D-Chicago. Formation of a regional transit system in northeast Illinois is considered one of the state's most pressing problems because of the continual financial problems of the Chicago Hi Open 7 - Shows 7:15-9:15 Now thru Wed! Tuesday VEAL PARMESAN $095 DINNER FREE "58 >5* BUY GET No CARRY OUTS 99c WEDNESDAY SPAGHETTI DINNER THURSDAY LASAGNA 99c Wed. & Thurs, SPECIAL TACOS or ENCHILADAS 5 for H.50 FREE DELIVERY With $5 Ord«r or Mor• 5 PM • 1 AM JOHN'S TACO HIDEOUT Phone 343 -MU CLOSED Will Re-Open Sat., Aug- H The EARL Knoxville The private ltfe of a public enemy DILUNGER W S BEN . CLORiS -MICHELLE JOHNSON LEACHMAN ™ American Inlernalionil NOW SHOWING 1 BATTLE FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES Open 8 Shows at Dusk Ends Wed! JOHN ^ H WAYNE ^••^ UNHID turns =—, MMSJUL IPG) PIUS ft Game" 1017 N. Henderson the Corner of Main & Farnham "Th* pl*c* lor « iaxaUy oi iun" 1824 N. Henderson St Phone 343-0213 lit Wednesday Special RIB EYE or FRIED CHICKEN Choice of laked or FF Salad, Roll & Butter Blue Angel Kitchen Open 5 Till 11 NOW THRU WED.! Open 6:45 -• Shows 78:55 4th A P ««iraart Release

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 8,900+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free