The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on April 10, 1956 · Page 69
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 69

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Location:
Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, April 10, 1956
Page:
Page 69
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It's always necessary to clean some eggs. They can be either sanded or washed. If they're washed, the water should be warm to open the eggshell pores which release dirt. The water should also contain a disinfectant, such as chlorine, to kill germs. Bringing pasture to the cows is a coming practice. This dairyman is supplementing pasture. Some are pulling self-feeding wagons directly into the feedlot. In addition to more crop growth, weed control, less trampling, and less fencing, a Missouri farmer says he knows exactly when his pasture runs out If a forage chopper is used. •rand n»w New Idea mounted parallel bar rake is exciting the interest of farmers throughout the rnuntry. Here's a really exciting new rake from NEW IDEA New mounted parallel bar rake fit» 21 different model* of tractor*, makes quality windrow* fa»t. rolling action. Makes unbroken windrows on corners, so baler operates without interruption. This is a rake that will really speed your haying the quality way — an all-new addition to the NEW IDEA line of hay tools. Unique in its field. Brand-new — the only mounted parallel bar rake that fits 21 different makes and models of tractors. Because it lifts, it maneuvers easily. Cuts raking time. Rakes at higher speed with less leaf shattering. It can cut raking time almost in half. This is partly because this unusual new tool moves hay from swath to windrow with half the forward motion. A double driving sheave provides a choice of speeds to accommodate variations in ground conditions or tractor PTO speeds. Makes fluffy, quality windrows. This new rake makes uniform, bunch-free windrows; your hay gets even curing. Puts leaves inside windrow, stems on outside. Handles hay gently in smooth, lifting. This new rake really makes quality hay the NEW IDEA way. Watch for the arrival of this unique new rake at your NEW IDEA dealer's. Write today for complete facts in new literature. Best idea yet... get a New Idea VAtM IQUIPMENT CO., emsioii y£fC0 OUIHHUTIMG co«r. Depl. 1801, Coldwaler, Ohio Seitd free literature checked D Mounted parallel bar rake D Booklet "Tried and New Ideas D Pull type rakes & tedders for Making Hay" Address- Town— -State "The more I use a ROTO-BALER, the better I like it." This !• what one owner of a ROTO-BALER had to say! "And," he continues, "I like being able to move fro one field to the next and leave the bales lay until I can catch time to haul them. I don't have to worry about rain. I know the hay is safe in the bale. I also like being able to bale the hay on the tough side and get all the leaves. I had some second crop analyzed by the College of Agriculture. It contained 18.48 percent protein." Cattle prefer the palatability and softer leafiness of round bales, too. Stems are crushed ... no sharp ends to hurt tender mouths. Livestock lick it up clean without waste. What about capacity? Another ROTO-BALER owner says: "We average 1800 bales in 10 hours in alfalfa making 3 1 /$ tons per acre." That's big capacity! The ROTO-BALER costs less to buy . . . less to run. And remember—there's nothing like round bales for protecting the quality of yoiur hay! See your Allis-Chalmers dealer. FARM EQUIPMENT DIVISION • MILWAUKEE 1, WISCONSIN Livestock prefer the soft leafiness of Round-Baled Hay—with quality sealed in ... weather sealed out. ALLIS-CHALMERS KOTO-HAI.ER Is nn Allln-rimlmrni Irmlomnrk PHOTO CREDITS Cover photo by Kabel Art Photos Wide World Photos, Jack B. Kemmerer, Grover Brinkman, John Jeter, Grant Heilman, Illinois Natural History Survey, O. V. Gordon, Jack McManigal, John Staby, J. C. Allen and Son, J. I. Case Co., U.S.D.A. CONTINENTAL FENCE FOR LONGER LIFE! CONTINENTAL STEEL CORPORATION KOKOMO, INDIANA

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