The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on April 10, 1956 · Page 42
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 42

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, April 10, 1956
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Page 42
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t-Algona (fa.) Upper De« Moines Tuesday, April 10, 1956 Tidbits."From Evelyn A certain man, a relative, was talking to my housekeeper. Esther, recently and have caPcd you early nfrnid I'd disturb -oh said. "I'd but I was . "tidbits." What is her name?" That gave me a good laugh, and I was highly gratified that the column title is remembered. •-. « * I was also gratified and amused ;-.i the aniu-s of Danny Kayo in "The Court Jester." That is the kind <'f show* I like. Something to tickle one's funny bone and you leave the theater light hearted and say. Wish we had more of thai type hi place of the shoot- Vm-up variety. * ' * * Esther just brought in a handful of hickory nuts she brought from Minnesota some time ago. They look like bitter nuts. These came from Kentucky, old home of her late husband, Erby Benson, who she says used to say. "This proves that things can be grown in Kentucky." What ha? become of ha/clnuts? I remember years ago when I was about eight or ten years old mother had a quart jar of nut meats she had shelled. She Kept them on the aa n try shelf and e\-ery now ;md then we'd have a treat from the iar. * * * A little fellow, a five year old, I talked with by pin-no the other day kept me entertained till his mother could take ihe line. He told me about his cat. Mitxie. and the kittens she had. The talk became, a little involved* but. I knew he had heard about tin- birds and bees, young as he is, for he informed me. old enough to be his grandmother, that Millie could have kittens. "Papa cats can't have them, you know It's only mama cats that do.' (Lesson number 1.) <•• * * Kristie Weydert comes to slay with her grandparents. Mr anci Mrs Chris Wallukait, frequontlj and finds so much entertainment he1~e—so many little playmates amon-g them Rickie Post. Everyone gets the wanderlust on a nice spring clay, and tots are no exception. The other day when grandma Wallukait couldn't find the youngsters in the immediate neighborhood, she { you can ; I pay twice [ • , [ the price, I but you'll never '' get a 'finer watch I k 1 ""•'''"*">' ICROTON | Buccaneer , „ w»t*rpt*oot* •As long as crystal is intact, case unopened w Ranks FIRST in Districts in Iowa Cbrn Yi Pioneer hybrids made this outstanding record competing against 293 different hybrids representing 45 different seed corn producers — including all of the major producers. No other producer ranked first in more than 2 districts. One year's results tell only part of \he Pioneer performance record. Pioneet corn also ranks . ,, FIRST in 5 oMO Districts with 2-Year Avcrages FIRST in 5 of 9 Districts with 3-Year Averages PLANT HIGH-YIELDING PIONEER CORN SEE OR CALL: Eugene Kollasch Bode Wm, Mqrtinek _. Wesley Walter Vawdt Whittemore T. O. Johnson Swea City Harold Jones Swea City Aaron $tegssy Algona C. L. Bailey — Algona J?. |. Mawdsley Algaiici tarled down McGregor street. \'o hint of Where they might be ill she came to the high school.. Thete she discovered Kristie's tricycle. .A talk with the janitor and" an inspection •>!' fr:e building sh.nvrd na wcmdorm-: youngsters. and then alonj; came mama Latino Post and sister, Joan Post. Papa Wey.lcvt ,e:-o appeared on scent. 1 i-ivi I he runa\\\iys were dise»vivi-d at HamiUun's, across the street, mud covert-d- ;md bespattered, nonchalant and completely unaware they had caused ;m\i"Us Miomonts. Kristie is :t I'm nd!y little girl and when vhe saw Jol-.n Mahonoy talking threuuh .. device lie uses r-ince m.i.i-'i- thro.,! suruery some time am', she asked hint, "Why don't you i-.,!i me on your telephone suir.e ti:ne? There was quite a mix-up between ih<- le-cal Oliver Bakken> and the Wallei 1'akkeiis at Bodt i\ few Sundays ago. The Olivet Bakken- diove t» B.nle to visit the W.il'.er B.ikkens and the Bode Bakl,on- diove here. They final ly u.-t together hen; when the Bode couple siiw the Algona cai purkc-fl m front of the Wayne Hans-en residence, the Hansen? being .-•nii-i:i-Ia.w :md daughter o Mr iind Mrs Oliver Bakken. How would you like to have ; vacation like Mr and Mrs Dot Orton pi,m'.' They teach at Grant Pass. Idaho. 1 believe. At any rate it's in the west. Early in June; they are leaving, with the- children Michael and Coimie. for London. England to visit Mrs Orion's parents. Eileen has been back a coupK> of time?, but a family vacation is much nicer. The parents, Mr and Mrs Osbourne made the trap here a few years ago. Since the; grandparents are aging. Mr and Mrs Orton considered it advisable to make the'trip themselves and take the grandchildren. Don has not been in England since lie was in service during the war and married Eileen th-ere. This is the time of year when houSowivos are ali at witter. With dean up time and remodeling time it's nu wonder Mrs Brings (Bernard) was at a loss for a news item. She replied, "We are adding to the house and I'm so mixed up and in such a mess I can't even think." 9 • » The Earl Sheppards had a bang up Easter dinner — 37 guests. They have a nice basement rooir to us,e as dining room for these giant dinners, a blessing as every housewife knows. it t.' ' !S The Gardon Club at a recent meeting discussed "A Spot in Algona I'd Like to Sec Beatitifiod." Ho\\i many can you think of? First of all I'd like to see the old Call theatre site eiiruir filled in and u.-:ed for parkins, or better, a nicv business building erected there. What business I don't know -but it would -bo. a wonderful improvement to that portion of the city. .'''• ' ' "• r -•• "• .y ' ,- (, Then there are soms businesses that have a:, colled ion'of clutter- on the parkins and around the building—unsightly too, ;mrl they disturb my .houst-'wil't'ly instincts. 1 love order and cleanliness. And why nut keep the side walks free of gravel. Why put the gravel there in the first place? A ce'm- ent bortk-r around the building which would bv easily kept n"at and clean, wouldn't, have b;:i;n too expensive and cvrUiinly t'ai more ;:tli'active and sanitary. Si:me of the dry hills north (.if town left stark and hideous certainly crude! b:.' covered with grass, "vines, or low growing shrubs. The beauty of tin- place was wrecked years ago \vitli the- first changing of the hill, but from time to time as work lias beet) done there the hills have been made more ugly. i> -.- ; i' Now, this is only a column don*; by a very iiisignit'uMiit parson so far as civic plan.-; are concerned. Nor do I mean any disparagement when 1 mentioned businesses and the possibility.' of a beauty treatment, so 1 hope no one lakes otlense. s .Ju:;l take it like 1 would il ,-inv one ol ihem would say io me "You are wearing a mo-it unbecoming hit." I'd answer, "Well, 1 lil-.t il, so what?" I altcm-Jed tho \V.S.C.(?. lunch- eoj; 'I'lir.sday and hea.'d 1!. II Beck o! Smril Lake talk on .juvenile ildiriiu< iicy. 11.- i.- tin- prob.ihi 1:1 d| ''icer Im Jinl_;e N:o'e\', uf Spirit Lake. Hudson ol Pm-a- I'loilla-.- ill id Si ilhil.il I i.l .-N:;iU'. il. lie s;e; ted !:... di:;ci.'iir.--e- In- .--av- ill'. 1 h.- W.-e; ii:i! ;i ••>•••• ,!-.( r Hi ; • i'< terms u--iu. l :l\ ai'ip'i.-d. Inn 1>- g;i\'e ,-i pl.'.r-,:iiit 'all; >i,i I-i -• (hi! .e- i'.jid witii i'iioU'.:h huiii'U' ir.jivli-il. he w;^ i'.':s\' In li-.hn lu. '.fhanl-: ;;m -diie.-'s t he. e v. ,i '.<'\ ;: !> •! i( i c ' I statii-t ics thriAvn ;it u ;. II.- invii- I ed (jui.-!. 1 "!).' 1 . ani! in i-!os ; i> : .'-u-iici i of the ir.isr'eim'f nor so curn.'iit- I wanton destruction !•!' prupeviy j Sil'H-i- !>•• JjH! i:iiich Hi t he lii- ',}: on 1,,-evnl.- I :•;.-.'i. ".Mavli- I!lad.- e.i • • I: I M :-!i- -'A'il!'.'. P' ip i 'V -\ ce:i i.i ' p Up V. ill. vh;i] t he f 1 !'hi-: - -;j.-l \-e-.r.-- :-:•-) ;,nd b •;isl ab.-ul." lie repiie.l i- ihutc.'Ml I l.-'i-! put .- ', 1 in- e:' (in ih.; I:;M..I We 1 !, :;n't il Jru:> --=- b-»st r.f j :i|. - --> - • .-' ',.. ,-,,.•• V.U,,)'V Til' i ome day and find us hero." Tfo ! eplied, "Oh, I'd just say you pit faint and I brought you. out or air." .•'..•'«!. v « «' 4 - TWs friend and I must have iron most rlnring for *ivc skipped choul »hc «l.tvrnd<ni to go botan- xing. Now there was plenty of iivie after school to do this, bxat t was so much more fun slipping iway. All. spring! True, we did ome botanizing, ate a lunch I lad prepared, sat on a hillside md drank in the good. May air; .nit uppermost was the feeling of l>ravado. A ' * ft "Shoriie" Lowe and I skipped school one afternoon too. Miss Coate rather prided herself that she knew all that was going on. But I took the wind out of her sails many years later when 1 gave her an account of it. I couldn't get away from the- feeling as f told her that I'd reap some punishment at her hands She ruled me completely for four years and habit was strong. None will ever take her place. * « * My mother has told me of some skipping she did too. 'Twas county fair lime and how awful i was when the fair was held in September years ago and one hac to be in school when there was such allurement at the fair grounds. So mother and some o her friends decided to do something ab.mt it. Armed with little spending money they had somehow hoaided, they went 1,0 the scene of forbidden delights. Not wanting to waste any precious coins on entrance fees, they went down by the barns. At that time animals were kept under tents. Choosing a place where the canvas of a concealing fence was loose, they roiled under and much to mother's ama/ement, sht was but a few inches from the hoove; of a hor?e. Had the •animal been frightened or of a bad disposition, mother would haVe come out on the losing end. t t * The story I remembered best of my father's misdemeanors is this. Since it involved only the family. I guess it isn't too great a crime. He and his brother Willis. (Pat to everyone wh(> knew him after he came to Algona.) decided' the cat had too long a tail. Dad was about thre:? years younger than uncle Willis and no doubt had ' the small boy's faith that older brother could do anything (and usually does.) Dad was to hold the eat while uncle jWillis bobbed the tail. It was a F very thankful cat that escaped when grandma appeared upon the scene, rescued her butchei knife and told the lads there would be no surgery that day—o; any other. Hi Jinks * * •* Dsvoied 10 "lieftind fh« Scenes" Hems From Algona I High School. Tom Hutchison's vigorous campaign for district .student council treasurer ended successfully. He WHS elected Thursday. Fov- tunatdy, the Thursday ntgiit bandits made off with none of the student;'council is^afe! ; ' M » '• ' j * '* - •;: U< s - * \,i ,- . " ; : ' Lorelie ftupp, ot softball lame, has been using her fast b£ll tb good ^Hyantage as she topped thje' girls'' gym classes bowling! it tfve' Hawkeye Lanes with a,smashing 188. Most of the girls were more consistent, staying in the 70's. * . * * No report is available yet on golf's "fearsome five",.but tennis coach ' Palmer hds siilJijiitted a progress report on his netmen which indicates that prapticesj if hot spectacular, are Lary Wicks and Max ttilrftefS i id ; tHe'ia ; festive shorts, Terry Cook's dap (defcideclly; dittei^tittj ahd Mr ' Palmer's dirty White s\veat shirt, dirty because it shrinks .when it , is wftShe"d, .all 'odd much to the color • awd gaiety, besides providing .tofSies for/ • conversation whin .-terinis talents displayed do not lend themselves well to same. s * * * Terry Cook established his claim to the.fhmed tradittoti; by crashing intci the net. HE Mid 1 rrot, however, break it as."his predecessor, , brother _ Dori did. Practices are just beginning, so there i£ still ample time. •• ; ;: if ';•'.*.* Tfn6 Ham "may-be ahaping up jfaJrfy well, but it is obvious that the coach is itt dire need of a vehicle, since He finds the four o'clock hike fo- the :courts ea.cn afternoon rather strenuous. Bicycle, anyone? —SS. The state lost one of its oldest residents recently, in the death of Mrs Louise Schradef at Ladora. She was ^97 years .of age, Her husband died in 1924. KILLED Ernest Dinsmore, CO, Logan farmer, was killed recently dp a tractor he was operating tipped over backward on him. He was driving the machine up or iiuiiue... <• . It's grand qs salad dressing and 3 spread ! 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TWO-TONE "ROCKET BURST" PATTERN, rich tan with colorful burst design on collar, body and sleeves with contrasting solid brown yoke front. This re- l/'\ verses to smart solid j' .\ brown sheen gabardine. . it*. NEW BRIGHT STAR PATTERN DESIGN Nylon-rayon light blu# with red and whit* stars forming on all over pattern which reverses to solid navy blue shean gabardine* w.v- •'; ' \)'. : .r." '.-•, •:., ,-M.. i! \v.,, !..'•'• LI i,.. .w:: ,\-i,:: ... ;i . : .l 1 «:;J!!k Transmissions We'd !ike yt;y to meet Kenny Wehrspcm, shown here as he looks up from t-,:s v/ork ai Ernie VViliiam's garage. Kenr.y has specialized en autDiiiaiic transmissions for several years. Just recently returned from a 6 day special training on Hydramatic a» the General Motors Omaha Training Center. Complete Auto Service — Washing — Greasing — Polishing ~ FREE - Pick-up and Delivery FREE. WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION

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