Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on October 16, 1963 · Page 21
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 21

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Galesburg, Illinois
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Wednesday, October 16, 1963
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Page 21
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1 , J •'' I It Y' > f V / • Hi 'if* VP*. f: i .'-..;.r" ' ' v -Kg 4 l| I 4 • • it'/. r '}• - - - '** k ~ ^^^^^^^^ ^ K* 1 [t: it f I* - ' r • 4 f x •Alas..*:*':? • "J. --• ^Hg^KSmBKr - SJ TULIPS Tulips, which must he planted in the Fall, blossom from late March through June. Almost every shape, size and color can be found in the 23 classes of the Tulip family. Some will bloom in pure most black. Many blossom in soft hues of pink, deep purple and yellow and in nearly every shade of red. Tulips blossom in single and multi-colors, and fully marked leaves. There are tulips that do not resemble tulips some look like peonies, others are shaped like lilies, and a few have fringed petals. There are proportioned flowers on long, stately stems and varieties which have large flowers on stems that measure almost Jhree feet. It is easy to understand tulip any have beauti- tulips with beautifully Spring flowers. DAFFODILS A byight daffodil gar- in a petal-carpet of color plantings in fields ap4 den will blossom early this Spring if you pUwt the bulbs this Fall. Daffo- in many hues of yellow, white and pink. These rock gardens as well ^ in 1 w many varieties will increase in numbers. Inter- naturalized settings. Once plant daffodils with other hardy bulb flowers are planted, daffodils will Dutch flowering bulbs for ideally suited f«* mm btaow for years mi axdeu. to yield next delicately curved and pointed petal? of th« J$p> Spring 's flowers. For the experienced gardener or the flowered tulips will add a graceful note they Ittttt 'begfrmcf, Fall stirs the imagination with visions of next to gentle Spring breezes. Springs garden sparkling with the magnificent colors and shapes of tulips, hyacinths; daffodils, crocus a many little bulbs. Practically anyone, young o* old, With or without gardening "know how can grow a bumper crop of Spring flowers with Dutch bulbs. Each Fall, ships unload millions of bulbs from Holland which must be planted in September, October, or November before the ground freezes solid. In warm Southern climates, bulbs can be stored easily in the refrigerator and planted as late As December or January. Bulbs, because of their; wide variety in shape, texture, color and height, lend themselves to all types of landscaping, They can be "naturalized" along paths, in woodland settings, around rocks, trees and shrubs. They are ideal massed in solid colors for spectacular effects, planted in rows thiree or four deep for a more formal appearance or arranged in planter boxes for decks, patios, terraces and 1 windows. At least ten weeks of Spring flowers can be assured through proper selection df bulbs — starting with the shy crocus, which may blossom before the last snowfall, and ending the season with the stately Darwin tulips in late May or early June. The early Spring garden can be ablaze of color with daffodils, hyacinths and the ear 1>/flowering tulips. Mid-season can be high- Bulb gardening is easy—nature does most of thd wotk. Here are a few simple rules that the Dutch follow, which may come in handy now that bulb planting time is here again; 1. Select bulbs eatly while retailers have ample supplies and a good choice of varieties. Quality bulbs cost only a few pennies more and guarantee beautiful blossoms. Pick some for early, mid- season and late floweting for the following Spring. 2. "Bargain buys" often prove disappointing^ So stick to quality Holland bulbs that will give you sura bloom the fitfst year you plant them. r 3. Bulbs should be planted before the ground freezes hard for the winter. This timing gives them the best root development Plant the bulbs in sandy, well-drained soil. If soil is "heavy," mix in some sand when planting the bulbs. Tulips, daffodils, and hyacinths are planted Six inches deep and six inches apart. Crocus and other little bulbs are planted three inches deep and three inches apart. Set the bulb firmly into the ground with the pointed end up. Cover the bulb with soil/Then water the area well and that's itl 4 5. Avoid planting bulb flowers in thin lines they lighted with the immense Darwin Hybrids largest flowering bulb in the tulip family. In May and June, the fringed petals of the exotic Parrot tulips will lend a touch of fantasy as they sway in the sun, while the are best set at least three rows deep in clumps. Most gardeners prefer informal arrangements with groups of 8 to 16 bulbs of one type and color planted in mass. Crocus and other "little* bulbs can be planted at random. FALL IS BULB PLANTING TIME Gardening with bulbs of the bulb should rest so that the roots will have Fall gardening efforts will a good chance to develop, be rewarded with magni* Nature will do the rest of ficent displays of bulb the work for you. Bulbs flowers. At the end of the is almost as easy as letting wild flowers come up where they will. Planting , daffodils firmly on the soil. Crocus, grape hyacinth, scilla and the other little bulbs are is easy, xuups, cianoans planted two to three „ . . , ,, and hyacinths are planted inches deep and two to &™ ™f cin J" st blossoming season, many six inches deep and six three inches apart. Bulbs » n y «nd of soil, and all bulbs can be left undis- inches apart with pointed must be planted before they need is good drain- turbed in their bed? to ends up. The flat bottom the ground freezes solid age. Next Spring, your flower for several years. ^^^^^^^^ HOLLAND BULB PLANTING GUIDE Now is the time to plant the tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, and other Dutch bulbs just arrived from Holland. Bulb flowers blossom in, many shapes and sizes and in almost every color. This simple dia«* gram explains how deep to plant the bulbs that can give you beau* tiful flowers for at least ten week* »ext Spring, h -

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