Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on October 7, 1963 · Page 1
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 1

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[ Homt Paper oft Communiti«f A Bettor Nanpaptr Weather Stripe Slue Cooler Tonight and Tuesday, Low in 80s, Maximum In Low 70t VOLUME LXXII GALESBURG, ILLINOIS — MONDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1963 PRICE SEVEN CENTS A iiway WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Appropriations Committee today voted deep slashes in the nation's civil defense, space and science programs. Among other things, it turned down the entire $195 million asked for a nationwide fallout shelter program. In a bill financing 26 executive agencies and offices, the committee approved only $13,102,818,700 of the $14,658,588,000 requested by President Kennedy for the present fiscal year. But even with the $1,555,769,300 cut, the bill's total as it went to the House floor for consideration later this week was $1,233,067,400 higher than the same agencies received last year. Less for Space The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was allotted $5.1 billion of the $5,712,000,000 the President had originally requested. Congress itself, in a separate authorization act, previously had cut the program more than $400 million. The committee was held to the authorization ceiling. The amount recommended for the space program was $1,425,885,000 more than Congress provided last year. Most of the mon­ ey approved was earmarked for research and development. An effort to cut the space agency funds further will be made on the house floor. Rep. Louis C. Wyman, R-N.H., called for additional reductions of $700 million, mainly in the program to send a manned space vehicle to the moon. The Veterans Administration's share of the funds was $5,372,430,000, almost the entire amount requested and a slight increase over last year. It included $1,075,186,000 to operate 121,486 hospital beds, and $3,921,000,000 for compensation and pension payments. The committee rejected the entire $195 million requested to finance a nationwide fallout shelter program which the House overwhelmingly authorized — but did not finance—last month. The Senate has not acted on the authorization bill. For all civil defense programs, including those now in operation, the President requested $346.9 million. The committee slashed this to $87.8 million. \ Rpes Out Crops In Many Places MIAMI, Pla. (AP) — Hurricane Flora lashed Cuba today for the fourth day in a row, dealing a crushing blow to the already staggering economy of Fidel Castro's Communist regime. Half of the island's sugar, rice, coffee, cotton and cocoa crops were reported wiped out by the wind and the torrential rain, and Flora was far from through with Mine. Nhu Chuong CONFUSING-Do Vang Ly, left, Viet Nam's new ambassador to the U. S., has disassociated himself with Mme. Ngo Nhu, whom he said cannot speak for his government. She arrived in the United States today to begin a speaking tour. Even Mme. Nhu's father, Tran Van Chuong, right, former ambassador, who resigned his post and has remained in Washington, has described his daughter as "an example of power madness. 9 ' He added that the present government is "so backward, inefficient and oppressive that it has I P° rt become the greatest asset to the communists/' UNIFAX Cuba. At 8 a.m. EST, she had started to move once again across the stricken nation. The turbulent eye of the giant storm crossed the south coast near Santa Cruz Del Sur and was thrashing very slowly toward the city of Camaguey. Sugar production, the backbone of Cuba's economy, already had fallen to the lowest level in 30 years, Castro admitted, of poor Communist management, lackadaisical work by peasants, and the breakdown of motor trans- r a Refuses Sign j s mn UNITED NATIONS, Trea ty . (UPI) — Cuba announced today that it will not sign the Moscow nuclear test ban treaty until the United States changes its policy toward Fidel Castro's government. Cuban Ambassador Carlos Lechuga, in a policy speech prepared for delivery in the General Assembly, said also that Castro's government would oppose a de­ nuclearized zone for Latin America unless the United States gave up its Guantanamo Bay base and included the Panama Canal Zone, Puerto Rico and other military bases in the hemisphere in any such agreement. Lechuga denounced U.S. intervention in Viet Nam, demanded Troops loyal to Premier Ahmed freedom for Puerto Rico, called Ben Bella tightened a machine- President Kennedy's Alliance for gun cordon today around the Progress a failure and drew at- mountain stronghold of 8,000 tcnUon to military takeovers oc- tough Berber rebels who threaten the nation with civil war. The first major uprising in Al geria's one-year history as an in- Ben Bella's Army Grcles Rebel Forces ALGIERS, Algeria (UPI) curring in Latin America. ; , SAIGON, ; »Vli6fc. «ljhp^4iilF>^«!^ President Ngo Dinh Diem said today the Communists are losing the guerrilla war in South Viet Nam. In an address opening the National Assembly, Diem said the Communist Viet Cong faces the "eventuality of an inescapable defeat." He also told his hand-picked assembly, in which there are no opposition parties, that South Viet Nam's Buddhist "problem" had been settled. His regime's recent crackdown on the Buddhists is to be debated in the U.N. General r Assembly, beginning this afternoon. Critical of Others Speaking while police enforced maximum security regulations in downtown Saigon, Diem said: As the 100-mile-an-hour storm —which already has taken more than 400 lives—moved into Cuba for the second time, the Bahama Islands came once more into range and Florida was threatened Storm Stalls In her first thrust into Cuba Friday, Flora gave signs that she would thrash on northward into the Bahamas. But the storm strength, although a large part of her circulation has remained over land for four days. The big storm churned up angry seas in the northwest Caribbean, southeast Gulf of Mexico Ceremonies Mark Signing Of Test Ban WASHINGTON (AP) - President Kennedy formally ratified the limited nuclear test ban treaty today, calling it "a clear and honorable national commitment" to the cause of man's survival. Kennedy, in a ten-minute ceremony in the historic Treaty Room of the White House, said the agreement to ban all but underground nuclear tests was "great with ph>mise" and marks a beginning that could lead to further and in Florida-Bahama waters. Gale warnings flapped as far East-West agreements. north as Stuart, almost a third J? 8 tr . eaty {aib '" Kennedy of the way up Florida's Atlantic sax ?' #<it * iU " ot doing, and even * * fails, we shall not A u A * u ^ i MI THAT WE MADE *"» COM A broadcast monitored in Mi- mitment, ami Sunday night said 30,000 persons had been taken from flooded Must Be Vigilant The President said the United ...... , - w States "can and must keep our villages around Victoria de las obvious Tunas and 4,700 from suburbs of to his earlier promise that the na- Santiago de Cuba—where Havana tion would be in a position to radio said drinking water ran out quickly resume atmospheric test- and many homes collapsed. More * uclear weapons should 9 some other power violate than one-fourth of Camaguey, capital of Camaguey Province, was reported flooded. treaty. With IS government officials and members of Congress look- Carlos Rodriguez, head of the ing on, Kennedy used 17 fountain Cuban Agrarian Reform Institute, pens to sign four copies of the was quoted as saying Flora may formal instrument of ratification. The Senate consented to ratifi- tttta. very - .moment, - it is with regret that we see some stalled over Oriente province, have wiped out half of Cuba's then turned westward back into coffee, cotton and cocoa pro- cation of the treaty by a 8049 the Caribbean Sea. MnHfan. vote on Sept. 24. More than 100 other nations duction. Only two deaths thus far have I Missing were crews of two Cu- - + been confirmed in the guarded I ban coastal fishing boats and two I have added their signature to reports from the radio. Th* cr^lffce^^ festwent to 1 w countries, intoxicated by false in- "an ultimate maneuver formation on the situation in Viet inevitable defeat. Nam and on the Buddhist question in particular, request and obtain inclusion was Communist inspired as " i« • Vn »Jrf tove been coated in Haiti. w aveix i Qjigjk jg ^ principal sugar waters between Caimanera and whose trucks were caught by flood He said the declaration of martial law after the wave of Budin the United Nations | dhist demonstrations and suicides U m iota* greemetat, saidSit tfie fiftt two decades of the age of nuclear energy "were full of feat." He said that, because of this agenda of a problem already settled." Communists and their accomplic- In New York, 16 Asian, African I es, and now a tempered, free and Latin producing province of Cuba and Guantanamo City, about 20 miles Flora in four days probably has from the U.S. naval base at Guan-1 treaty, "today the fear is a little done more damage to the crop tanamo Bay. Other farm workers (less and hope a little greater." While emphasizing the limited nature of the treaty, Kennedy expressed hope that it would be the forerunner of other, broader r~~~;**~i *u i. .i than the anti-castro rebels have were reported marooned on roofs. E?^. „JT?^ o£ * e done in four years with sabotage. I Before Flora assailed Cuba, she Tobago the Buddhists. spiracy agreements which, he said, may be more difficult to achieve. Kennedy first used 16 pens to The hurricane lay nearly sta-]sign the instruments of ratittca- The 8 a.m. advisory placed the killed 17 people on American nations Viet Nam emerges from this an- *J CwTl.?^! " E-ta!!LTSTft. calling on U.N. Secretary-General ing victoriously surmounted this 2m! duced to rubble U Thant to intercede in behalf of new assault of Communist con- ^ ^ whirIed outward 400 *»* ^ „ . . . miles to the north, well up the tionary in the Caribbean Sea all cation. He also praised his armed fore- caast of Ftorida> an d 200 miles to Sunday, centered about 380 miles Having distributed these, he for several "major victories" ^ over Jamaica. One south-southeast of Miami. She reached for a 17th and added a c A . „. . 4 j 4 10 . Mekon S Delta » where °° m - death has been reported in Ja- churned up rough seas in the few flourishes to his signature on South Viet Nam is expected to murast resistance has been strong- flooded mountains. Rain northwest Caribbean, southeast one gilt-bound copy, saying: .extended into the Bahamas. Gulf of Mexico and Florida-Ba- itv u - A ' Diem's speech was broadcast I M *™ hmriranM in the nast hamas waters. Gale Diem has sent a special six- man mission to the U.N. to de-1 es for several fend his government. South Viet Nam is counter the criticism in the as-1 est. sembly with an invitation to an see the situation first hand. Search Resumes for Party Lost in Mexican Jungles , . . . A . Many hurricanes in the past hamas waters. Gale warnings mtern^ona! mpedwn^ team to throughout Saigon over street have made sharp changes in di- flapped as far north as Stuart, uuckpeabera. rection, even looped the loop, but almost a third of the way up Absent at the tir&t session of forecasters said it is very unusual Florida's east coast, the National Assembly was for a storm to sit so long in one Diem's fiery sister-in-law and of- place, as Flora has. I have to get one for myself* Forecasters at Miami said Flora ficial hostess, Mrs. Ngo Dinh who begins a three-week Nhu, was expected to take a northward Retains Power I tack today. That would turn her Even more unique is the fact | rain-laden fury loose once again CHIHUAHUA, Mexico (UPI) dependent nation has so far been . . . , , . , almost exclusively a war of ^ aenal_ search resumed^ today words. for 14 U.S. adventurers and three Court Admits 70 Attorneys To Practice Ben Belk's troops, dressed in three n*J Supreme Court opened its 1963-64 battle garb, set up roadblocks the Rxo ^ Urnqu^ that the exped, Shots were fired for the first Mexican rescuers feared lost and time last Friday, when a rebel starving along a treacherous, soldier was wounded and six ley- swAollen ^"'f Cadres River WASHINGTON (UPD The alists captured. A search plane Sunday spotted rafts along BULLETIN CHIHUAHUA, Mexico (UPI) Fourteen Americana and three Mexicans who were feared lost in the wild canyon country of northwestern Mexico are all safe, a pilot re- tour of the United States today to that Flora has maintained her I on eastern Cuba, defend the Diem regime. head of the secret police, were I Liberal Cardinals Defend elected to the assembly in the recent election. Both posed. were unop- Although Mrs. Nhu's American Plan to Enhance Bishops . VATICAN CITY (UPI) - Lib- tour was officially billed as a per- eral cardinals from North Amer- sonal visit, the government hoped i ca , Western Europe and Africa she might sway U. S. public opin- assured the Ecumenical Council around Blida and on the highways to Medea, Michelet, Ber- roughia and Boufarik in an at- to begin conferring on a record-1 tempt to seal off the insurgents. term today With a 22-minute ceremonial session, then adjourned tion had used, but no survivors were sighted. An airplane and helicopter were sent out today. "I am confident they will be found," said James C. Dean, 31, breaking number of cases on the Patrols fanned out overland. , rtnlrnf There were indications Ben ? f **** ff£ a m * m » 1 r ww«Hva Bella was planning to try end the wta *imWrf out of Jhe des ; Race relations and legislative k-oW r 6 ' ,A i — ™-- J ~ -~ 1 A - 1J t A soon by moving jkte count ^ ^day «nd told of reapportionment cases shaped up with force against t h e rebels. ^s companions plight "war" as the two most significant is- The rebels accuse Ben Bella of sues. At today's brief opener, seventy attorneys were admitted to practice, including Deputy Atty. Gen. Nicholas B. Katzenbach and Rep. Kenneth A. Roberts, D-Ala. Chief Justice Earl Warren smilingly welcomed each. Retired Justice Harold H. Burton watched proceedings from the special section reserved for guests. Mrs. Warren and the wives of all the other justices ex- 0. Douglas cept Justice WUliai the audience. were married also were ix The Douglases during the summer recess. Mrs. Douglas had planned to be present but was unavoidably detained elsewhere, a court aide veDortecL The semi-scientific group ran short of food when their rubber setting up a dictatorship and ig- _ „ noring the 2 million Berbers #* m * I* 0 " who make up one-sixth of Al- boulders and had to por- geria's population. ^ floats over ob ' stacles. Dean said some days they floated only 100 yards. Hopes For Escape Dean expressed hope the explorers may have scaled the brush-littered walls of Barranca Thomas F. Jobnsoa was given a de Cobre (Copper Canyon) and six-mooth prison term and former started walking through the Alabama congressman Frank mountainous country toward civ- Boykia was fined $40,000 today on ilization. BULLETIN BALTIMORE, Md. (UPD-For er Maryland ceagressmac charges of coaflict of interest m eewffamcy. Two vice -consuls for the United States from Juarez, Robert O. Federal District Judge Rowel Homme and Ralph G. Thorsland, C. Thomsen handed down the sea- were with the flying searchers, teaces and fines for Boykia, John- They carried walkie talkies and son Md two other men, J. Ken- planned to drop one to the party, neth Edlia and Miami attorney if it were found. WUltaa tokimm* The canyon, a sleoder gap in ported from the scene today, ion following the recent unfavora- today that no threat to the pri- »u» ™«rr<>A MIW ble Pwb^ty over the crackdown macy of the Pope is involved in the rugged terrain falling from on the Buddhu. a p ' oposal to e ^ ance the paw- the Continental Divide eastward, U, S. Ambassador Henry Cabot ers of bishops, is heavily overgrown and so nar- Lodge delivered a sharp protest A parade of prominent prelates row that helicopters would face to Diei « government against strongly defended in council de- danger in descending. Updraft the bcattag of , American bate the idea that bishops of the new* correspondents by secret po- church constitute a "college 18 or lice Saturday. The nemmen were sacred winds also are hazards. Mexicans Aid inn iy which shares with at the scene of the sixth protest the Pope responsibility for the A Mexican government plane suicide by a Buddhist. The melee government and welfare of the was used today along with a heli- began when plainclothesmen tried whole church. Some conservative to seize a movie camera. copter furnished by Gonzales Herrera, secretary of the state of Chihuahua. The plane had been in the search since Dean brought back word of the dilemma. Dean and tarry Davis of Price, Utah, were ordered by the expedition leader, John L. Cross of Orem, Utah, to leave the main party Sept. 28 and forge ahead to a copper mine where a cache of supplies was available. They planned a oneway trip to the food, but it took four days of swimming, plunging over waterfalls, walking and scaling until two Indians found them. The two had not eaten in two days aj Deao was ill* 1*1 Where to Find 2 SECTIONS 22 PAGES Abingdon JO Amusement - 6 Building 17 Bushnell 6 Classified Ads 20-21 Comics-TV-Radio 16 Editorial 4 Galva 6 Hospital Notes € KnoxviUe IS Markets 22 Monmouth 15 Obituary IS Sports 1213-14 Weather * Women in the Neve .... I*» council fathers have voiced fear that the concept endangers papal supremacy. Disputes Spellman Another highlight of today's debate was a vigorous rebuttal by Julius Cardinal Deopfner, liberal archbishop of Munich, Germany, of a speech delivered last week by Francis Cardinal Spellman of New York. Spellman had attacked a provision in the document on the church now before the council which would permit the ordination of married deacons in missionary territories which have a shortage of priests. Doepfner disputed Spellman 's contention that the of priestly celibacy. He said the deacons would be carefully chosen to meet special circumstances and would not be merely *'second class priests without the obligation of celibacy." Strong statements in favor of the "collegiality" concept were made by Albert Gregory Cardinal Meyer of Chicago, Paul Emile Cardinal of Leger Franziskus Cardinal Montreal, of Rugambwa would threaten tha proposal tradition Koenig Vienna, Joseph Cardinal Lefevre of Bourges, France, Bernard Jan Cardinal Alfrink of Urtrech, Netherlands, Laurean Cardinal of Tanganyika and Patriarch Maximov IV Saigh of Antioch, of the Melchites. Gives Warning Guiseppe Cardinal Siri of Genoa was the only conservative cardinal to take part in today's debate, and he acknowledged the desirability of some council recognition of the importance of the College of Bishops. But he warned that the bishops have no existence as a joint body and no power "except in union with the Roman pontiff." Cardinal Leger said that no one should be afraid that the enhanced role of the bishops would in any way weaken the doctrine of papal primacy* Red Chinese Interpreter Seeks Asylum TOKYO (UPI) — An interpreter for a Communist Chinese scien* tific delegation climbed over the wall of the Soviet Embassy be. fore dawn today and asked for political asylum, diplomatic sources reported. The Japanese Foreign Office identified the defector as Chou Hong-ching, 44, who came here with the delegation last month for an international conference on oil pressure machinery. The sources said Chou made his way to the Soviet Embassy about 4 a.m. today, climbed over the seven-foot concrete wall, and asked Soviet officials for asylum. Airline sources said five members of the delegation left for home today but three others, including the leader, remained in Tokyo, One report identified Chou as a member of the faculty at Peking Industrial University. Soviet and Chinese spokesmen declined comment on the defection, the second of a Peking official in recent days. In Moscow, Communist sources said Sunday that Chou Hising-pu, second secretary of the Peking Embassy in London, had elected to stay in the Soviet capital with his wife and two children. Chou arrived in Moscow several weeks ago, ostensibly on hi* way home, but he did not continue his (trip to China.

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