Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on October 2, 1963 · Page 27
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 27

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Galesburg, Illinois
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Wednesday, October 2, 1963
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Page 27
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Golesburg Register^Mail, Golesburo, III. Wednesday, Oct. 2, 1963 27 A SCROLL IN RECOGNITION of the 50th anniversary af the founding of the Knoxville Woman's Clan, was presented by* Mrs, M. F. Cline (left), 15th District presidents! Ihe Federation «f Women's Clubs to Mrs. Ralph O. Stone, president of the Knon- ville Club. Tuesday, afternoon's meeting was In tbe Gen^ Henry Knox Room inthe old Knoxville C^a'thouse. Knoxville Woman's Club Observes 50th Anniversary Miss Ada Mathes and Mrs. Rhoda Allen Howe. Members from other clubs in the county were present > to observe the anniversary. A musical program • was presented by' Mrs. William Bice of Victoria, accompanied by Mrs. Harold Moore of Oneida. The program was introduced by Mrs. Weldon Shreves. Among the guests from other clubs attending were Mrs. Lela Webber, president of Knox County Woman's Club and Mrs. Glen Foster of Yates City, members of the "Knoxville Junior Woman's Club, and Mrs. Raymond Bennison, Ft. Worth, Tex., a sister of Mrs. Harold Young. Refreshments, were served from a table decorated with yellow and white chrysanthemums. Hostesses were Mrs. A. C. Peterson, Mrs'. Eric Hale, Mrs. George Mehlcie, Mrs. Russell Cronoble and Mrs. Harley Steele. Reopens Saturday Sue T. Chin, who submitted to surgery early iri> September for the removal of his voice box, KNOXVILLE - The Knoxville Senior Woman's Club celebrated its 50th anniversary at an "afternoon meeting Tuesday in the General Henry Knox room* of the courthouse. Eight past presidents were introduced by the chairman, Mrs. Ralph Stone. Each of the women was presented with a corsage of purple asters. Mrs. M. F. Cline, 15th District president, presented the club with a plaque commemorating its 50th year. Mrs. Arthur R. Howe, of Muscatine, was the • guest • speaker. She was a charter member of the Knoxville Woman's Club and recalled the early years of the club history. Mrs.' Howe, a former Knoxville schoolteacher, told of each teacher receiving an invitation to meet in the dining room of the Presbyterian Church to organize the club.. Mrs.. G. W. Thompson of Galesburg was the speaker at that first meeting. Among others interested were Card LHtle Mary J. Gttstafsfi Miry Bowman Jerry Brodine Howard Gibson Chock Johnson BIG NIGHT AHEAD-Ssturdsy Knoxville High School's annual Homecoming party Is to be held in Jensen Gymnasium, starting at 7:30 p. m., with the selection and crowning of queen and king to take place at that* time. Candidates are shown above. Attendants selected for the event are Sherry Lewis, a Junior; Marlena Marqulth, a sopliomore, and Judy Hopping, n freshman. Crownbearers are Candy Palmer and Tony Garoutte. Steve Johnson and Don Owens will be senior marshals with Tom Walters, master of ceremonies. Former Coach Wendell and Mrs. Stamps will preside at the coronation. KNOXVILLE ANNABEL PETERSON CORRESPONDENT Home Address: 210 N. Timber St Phone 289-9172 is to reopen his restaurant Saturday on the south side of the Public Square. Within less than three weeks since the operation performed in the Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital in Chicago, he has learned to speak a few words, although unable to conduct a vocal conversation as yet. Attend .Workshop Three officers of the Knoxville High School Girls Athletic Association and their adviser, Miss Helen Verner, recently attended a district workshop in Mount Sterling. Those attending were Mary Gustafson, president; Dee Woolsey, vice president and Jo Lynn Shoyer, historian. State faculty officers of GAA Birthday Celebrated; EAST GALESBURG—The siith birthday of Jackie Shanks' was celebrated with a party at Her home. Guests were Dale Hopping, Debbie Hall, Timmy Hall, Bertha Forrell, Jimmy Bybee, Kathy Jackson, Ann Eddy, Kathy Corbin, Carol Barnhill, Cindy Lufkin and Sheryl Kerinett. met with'faculty 'members attending and student panel members discussed various interests in local and state GAA chapters. Want Contacts Parents of sophomores, juniors and seniors who : have not been contacted for donation for the Letterman's banquet may contact anyone on the ways and means committee of the PTA. Birth Record CAMBRIDGE - Mr. and Mrs. John Moriarity are the parents of a daughter, born Sunday in St. Mary's Hospital,' Galesburg. The paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Moriarity of Cambridge. Attend Social - ; NORTH HENDERSON A large crowd attended the ice cream social at the North Henderson grade school Sept. 26. Table's were centered with garden flowers. Over" $300' was taken in. Dallas City Class Officers Announced DALLAS CITY - Dallas City High School officers have been elected for the year. They are: Freshmen, President, Maurice Foresman; vice president, Her- foie Smith; secretary, Rita Roe; Student Council, Stephen Coffman, Sophomores, President, Lynn Frice; vice president, Linda Nicholson; secretary - treasurer, Pam Pence; reporter, Jim Molter and Student Council, Ronnie Bennett. Juniors, President, Jim Nixon; vice president, Bob Ault; secretary-treasurer, John Molter; Student Council; Beth Steffey. Seniors, President, Emmanuel DeFrates; vice president, Kay Carothers; secretary - treasurer, Jeri Stice; Student Council, Pat St. Ores and reporter, Sheila Smith. TUB DOCTOR SAYS Rh Factor Can Condition Baby 9 8 Arrival in World By WAYNE G. BRANDSTADT, M.D. Newspaper Enterprise Assn. Tryout -in Toronto READ THE CLASSIFIEDS! NEW YORK (AP) — A first play written by a young New Yorker is to get first audience test next fall at the Crest Theater in Toronto. • "The Four Faces of Two People," by Albert Meglin is being produced by Bill Freedman, with New York exhibit intended to follow the Canadian tryout. One of the greatest hazards to the newborn is a result of Rh incompatibility. If your blood is Rh-positive you are one of the 85 per cent with this type of blood. The rest have Rh-negative blood. This grouping has nothing to do with the A-B-0 groups which must be determined before a transfusion is given. Rh-negative mothers who are married to men who are, Rh-positive may give birth to babies who have erythroblasto­ sis, a blood-destroying disease that caused many deaths before the cause was discovered. A woman with Rh-negative blood may become sensitized to Rh-positive blood through having had a transfusion with Rh-positive blood or through carrying a baby whose blood is Rh-positive like the father's. A woman who becomes sensitized during pregnancy but who has not had a baby with erythroblas­ tosis has a good chance of having a baby that is normal. Or it may have a blood disease, which is mild and can be easily controlled with a few srfiall transfusions of Rh-negative- blood. But once the mother is sensitized, the danger to the infant becomes greater with each succeeding pregnancy. The erythroblastotic baby may appear to be normal at birth, but becomes jaundiced within a few hours. The jaundice increases rapidly and may obscure the pallor that would go with the infant's anemia. This anemia is due to the fact that the sensitized mother has developed antibodies that destroy the baby's Rh-positive blood cells. These antibodies are transferred to the baby through the placenta and umbilical cord. In severe cases the baby can be saved if the possibility of the disease is recognized in advance and arrangements are made to give the baby an exchange transfusion. This is a massive transfusion that replaces all of the baby's Rh-positive blood with blood from an Rh-negative donor of the same A-B-0 group. Since the mother's antibodies are. destructive only '-to Rh-positive cells,- the I; transfused' Rh-negative blood is not affected, and the baby survives. When an Rh incompatibility is suspected, another procedure is also. used to improve the baby's chances. Oddly enough, this is the induction of labor 14 to 28 days ahead of the expected data of delivery. This is, because the transfer of destructive antibodies to the infant's blood occurs at an ever-accelerating rate in the last weeks of pregnancy. , Although, as pointed oat In a previous column, the development of the baby In the uterus to full term has many advantages, this Is one to* stance in which early.Indue- tion of labor is the lesser of two evils. Main Family Moves EAST GALESRURG—Mr. and Mrs. Garvin Main moved into the Elzie Rutledge property at 113 California Ave., here. < Banks Family Moves EAST GALESBURG - Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Banks and family have moved in,the Dick Poulson property. ,. ; Mute utKi -fatcC M . « ~«« y , KING SUE mmum] RED & WHITE 738 NORTH SEMINARY LUCKY BALLOON SOLE Each time you enter Hit store, we will give you a colorful balloon; and you win whatever is on the ticket inside the balloon. Free prizes and' merchandise for everyone. Special contests for the youngsters. Lot of fun—try your luck. LIBBY tOMATO JUICE 46-oi. i Cans HILLS BROS. COFFEE WHIP QT. IMIT. JEAN Lbs. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities SALE ENDS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 YOU'LL ALWAYS FIND — A CLEAN, BRIGHT STORE, TOP QUALITY MEATS & PRODUCE EXTRA SERVICE and COURTEOUS, FRIENDLY CLERKS! of PETE'S RED & WHITE PETE PRINA Owner-Mgr. OPEN 100 to 800 Monday thru Satvrday CLOSED SUNDAY WATCH RED t WHITE ADS EACH WEDNESDAY FOR WEEKLY SPECIALS SEALTEST COTTAGE CHEESE LIMY *% Lb. Z <=rt. PUMPKIN HYGRADE CHEESE FOOD 2 Lb. Crr. MUSCATINE SWEET ••> 10c POTATOES ••> 10c SOLID, CRISP CARROTS Each IOC HOME GROWN • ACORN SQUASH 10c GARY-Produce Mgr. -10c Dissatisfied with the meat you are serving? Swift Premium Round Steak » 69c Swift Premium Chuck Roast <•> 45c Swift Premium Rib Steak --»>• 75c Swift Premium Boneless Rump lb The Swift Premium label guarantees satisfaction!!! Swift Premium Sirloin Swift Premium T-Bones Swift Premium Bacon lb. lb. lb. 89c 99c 49c or Sirloin Tip Swift Premium 4th to 7th Rib Standing Rib Roast ib. 65c Swift Premium LINK SAUSAGES GROUND BEEF lb. 49c 09 3»* $ 1

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