Evening Standard from London, Greater London, England on March 22, 1952 · 4
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Evening Standard from London, Greater London, England · 4

Publication:
Location:
London, Greater London, England
Issue Date:
Saturday, March 22, 1952
Page:
4
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yrirr a i t i in t y - rtl kHiib I irt h — O r "'JV : bMi -Tr iTihn h'ii '-a-L5"5Jr3 9rAApfiip a i rn BATDKDAT HAnpB U Jsgj PAOS 4— EVENING 8TA1VDARD nn 'In K: ri fc"' 1 1 - WHEN dealt with at arms W length civil servants seem t: aloof and unemotional fellows £ but should anyone have the i opportunity to observe them :V their defences down at work' i and play - in their native i habitats he will soon discover - that beneath the black broad cloth beat hearts that have their human fallings - V Two subjects in particular are calculated to cause a quickening pulse rate in Whitehall The first is the subject of emoluments and their increment or as other people put t :lt wages and rises and as this Is a copcem which the ' civil servant shares with the -rest of the world it need entail - mo further discussion i 'The second ' subject for palpitations is much ' more interesting It takes the form of a passionate preoccupation jwith the details of the office 'furnishing The higher the jank the more abandoned is this passion Nothing is more baffling to the uninitiated than to happen to observe an Undersecretary of State steal into a colleague’s room whip off the ’ measurements of the desk with Va steel tape and retire shaken ’Kwith fits of sobbing broken by the moan of "Five feet three and a half!" Nor until the explanation is known does it help to be’ informed that the desk of the afflicted one is only jjflve feet three Carpet and coal To understand this behaviour It Is advisable to think about the Egyptian Pharaohs Their place in the hierarchy it will be remembered was marked by the number and value of the precious stones- the bags of wheat the sacks of coins and the golden amulets that were walled up with them And in precisely the same way the status the dignity and prestige of the British civil servant is demonstrated by whether or not he has a carpet under his feet or a coal fire to himself He values these things not for themselves but as the insignia of rank ' If the explanation has been followed so far the way is dear ' for a mature and responsible r- assessment of the Importance of ('decisions made? by the Ministry of Works-this week The Ministry has promulgated a new scale of living space for civil servants Typists rate 40 to 60 sq ft each principals 80 to 100 sq It and every 1 - 'deputy secretary is entitled to 200 to 250 sq ft k Seeds of anguish -- i None but the vulgar would ' object that the average typist like— If the phrase is permissible — the average- deputy 1 secretary has two lungs and roughly the same Intake if not the same output of air This is to miss the point and spirit of the new standards It would - have done just as well had they provided that every typist must have her own Dome of Dis- covery and all deputy secre-( taries be congregated in a Black Hole of Calcutta - What matters Is that there is -a difference and the real criticism of the regulations is £ that by allowing a margin of 50 sq ft in the highest category they have sown the seeds of anguish feuds and discontents which may have serious 111- ' effects on the efficiency of the nation’s administration rpHE QUEEN' has -now - decided about her "shadow”— the police officer who will accompany her on all engagements She is keeping as her own detective Inspector Thomas J : Clark : who was with her several years when she was Princess Elizabeth - dark - 45 la a - Channel Islander He has been In the Metropolitan Police 23 years was with the Queen In Kenya The Queen Mother - Chief Superintendent Cameron who was King George’s " shadow ” for more -than 20 years has retired Chief Inspector A E Perkins was to succeed him- I now 'understand that Chief Inspector Perkins will remain with the Queen Mother he (has been her detective 10y -years - : - Up - till now ! Prince Philip has had no detective of vhls ‘own4 One will be appointed to himyv-o -Poly chief retiring TITAN known to thousands ’ of London students Mr Curtin McKenna is retiring next August For 23 years he' has been secretary at the Regent Street Polytechnic: He is 65 plans to devote himself to social work He lives at Isleworth is chair-: man of Marylebone Borough Youth Committee 'and treasurer of the Red Cross Socictyt M I’m not going to sit at home and smoke' my pipe” says Mr McKenna Two for VISA LADY SUM TO-DAY Her knbiiid will fellow Cj AILING for New York u to-day were Lady Slim wife of Field-marshal Sir - ' William Slim Chief of the A cut I WISH I had never aped 1 my betters and learned to put pen to paper Little did I realise when I complained in this journal some two or three weeks ago that there was no way of feeding our population of fifty millions unless every square inch of soil was cultivated that it would have such unfortunate results A To silence one reformer you need only produce another I vow if ever 1 get rid of this busybody who is now sitting in my yard never to open my mouth again let alone hatch any political or economic blue-prints It serves me right a wise man digs his " - : : i f j Imperial General Staff and Mrs W W: Astor wife of the MP for Wycombe Bucks As tor’s son-"" Lady Slim lain the Media-Mrs Astor travels 5 in the Queen 'Mary y - Field-marshal Slim ’ will : join his wife next month' He was due to sail with her- but War- Office business - keeps : -him back He is to give lectures in the United States vr:' j-A" baby' son ’ The beautiful Mrs Astor 31 is Lord Grantley’s - only daughter She married almost seven years ago had a baby son last December and is visiting America' for health reasons She will stay with some Of the' American ' As tors in New York Mrs Astor will be returning home next month ‘ Taxi without a flag I DROVE to-day in a taxi which had a ' meter but no flag The meter ls the first to be fitted "to a London taxi Is on trial Instead 'of the flag signs light up saying: 1 FOR HIRE 2 "HIRED or 3 STOPPED— that means the-same as when a driver puts a glove on his flag The meter looks smaller than the usual type because it lies on its side instead of being vertical The driver ' tells me he gets a better view to his nearside as there is no flag in the way In Berkeley Square ANOTHER step towards A making Berkeley Square London’s great centre for the motor trade: Standard Motors have taken new premises in Berkeley Square House for their export department The place should be open before the end of the year Medals of the week T ORD ONSLOW— My Lends -Li this is an amendment moved to meet various points concerning the limitation of ’-ancillary workers to the extraction of deciduous teeth Lord Calverley— I went to school at the age of three I -won all four of my prizes before I was six -i Wrestler-Premier T AST time 1-met John Stephen Senanayake Prime Minister of Ceylon was in 'London in January last year He was going to hospital to have his heart examined MNo trouble” he said "Just a check-up” He died to-day aged 67 Senanayake had been all-in wrestler boxer cricketer fJAHiSVJOURNALl own garden fools look over the wall As a matter of fact that is what I- had been doing all the morning: drilling my own cliff fields and so busy keeping the tractor straight I had not even glanced over the hedge to see what Amos was or was not up tor I had been towing a seed mix tore lor silage: oats peas and vetches with a few pounds of rye grass and trefoil added to give it a bottom and some aftermath for the cattle to graze after I bad taken a cut As T filled the drill for the last turn round the headlands I could not help seeing the countryside around me fields and fields of ploughland with beetle-like tractors busily clawing their way over them And oddly enough I was filled with the most unusual of emotions pride Perhaps this was justifiable because I can easily remember when all this patchwork quilt of husbandry was idle with bracken and profh- 4 gate with gorse : derelict save lor the rabbits which spawned over it all At this time of the year England's a garden without a weed of neglect or a bhght of disappointment It is all promise and as I glanced at these surrounding fields — some being rolled others harrowed — I felt proud to be an English farmer even one in Devon For I would have you know that we English farmers produce more food than do any other farmers Though - American industrialists may improve on ours their fanners only support 13 people: whereas the average farmer in England provides food sufficient for 17 peoole 1 believe tfie figure for FTanre Is 13 and for India it is ac low as three I MPY WjFE OFF Mrs W W Astor on the way to Southampton to-day sails in tho Queen Mary Sen : Two for USA ' In an athletic body he had a forthright mind "The Colonial Office system” he said in 1945 "is government by an autocrat with -the assistance of bureaucrats” That was when he was fighting for independence He won the fight became Ceylon’s first Prime Minister in 1948 Mr Senanayake has died a wealthy man ' He had large land holdings But he cared little for riches gave his 33 years of political life to 1m- proving: the status of his -countrymen Sir EmestY estate TCRIENDS of Sir Ernest A Graham-Little who died " aged 83 in October 1950 are surprised to see that in- his will just published his estate is shown as only £8073 but- with net personalty nil For ' Sir Ernest a doctor by 'profession was one of the leading skin ' specialists ' in the country his fees and Income were high For 26 years he was MP for London University There Is no question that - am told our runners-up are the Japs but as their diet is so dull they don’t count Having indulged in this meditation of self-esteem I drove back to the farm only to find a fearful-looking woman standing beside her car waiting for me She wore a pork-pie hat and heavy tweeds From her stance I reckoned her natural habitat was on the bridge of a dreadnought Her arms wee ' filled with literature pamphlets bulged - out of her pockets There was purpose in her voice " My man” she said with more optimism than hope "are you aware that you have grossly misinformed the public? You state that 50 million people can’t be supported on the -produce of this island Tush ! She then thrust a pamphlet into my horny band “What you mean” she continued “is that we can’t support 50 million meat-eaters for it takes two acres to produce one bullock but if this nation were to turn vegetarian we could double our population" “ God forbid ! “ I interrupted "Do you realise” she went on that a man needs only 2cwt of potatoes per year: yet if seven tons of potatoes are ted to pigs they only produce 5jcwt of bacon Waste I ” “ Waste ! ” I repeated in order to curtail the lecture But to no avail "What’s more” she asked "how many acres do you throw away growing barley?” Twelve” I replied proudly "And what happens to that barley? ” ie demanded " It makes beer” I said dreamily Exactly” she snapped And those 13 acres if growing lettuce could feed 200 people” “Or rabbits I replied We are yill glarjig at each other To science one reformer you need only produce another WORLD COPYRIGHT KEbKIiVKC TO: NEW YORK Sly Ernest died a poor man : He left considerable settled funds Some of these will be liable to death duties - Long before L the - war - Sir -Ernest had made settlements on his children Both died ' before hlnr His daughter was drowned in 1932 his son' a barrister was killed with the RAF In 1942 The settlement on his son then reverted -to Lady Graham-Little Sir Ernest also made a settlement many years ago on : his wife She was left with: ample means and she owns a house In - town but spends most of her time at her home -In Epsom Ballyhoo book TT is a long time since a book x was launched with such ballyhoo as Chester Wllmbt’s The Struggle - for - Europe Next week this' controversial ‘ history of the war will be published In America - ‘ - Wilmot appears in a BBC television programme about the book on Monday On Tuesday he files the Atlantic On Wednesday he will appear on television In New York ‘For five weeks he will eat lecture speak- on the radio and be seen on -TV-!— all to ' Hie wisdom FILTER drive up sales in the United States and Canada - Wilmot’s London pub llshers Collins have spent thousands on publicising the book here - They tell me that so far the 1 English edition has sold around 100000 copies since it was published two months ago It costs 25s ' On a normal royalty hm that ' would mean rat' least £20000 for the author -There still appear to be ‘plenty of copies in the bookshops - Saints or Sinners ? rpwo Ministers and a Judge will speak next month at the dinner of the Saints and Sinners Club Members-successful business and professional men raise money for boys’ dubs ' Lord - Justice Blrkett will propose the toast of the cluh Sir David Maxwell Fyfe Home Secretary will reply Mr Oliver Lyttelton (Com-monwealth Relations) will also speak - - v Australian heireks F London to-day Is Miss Caroline Fairfax 21 -year-old co-heir with- her brother to one of Australia’s biggest newspaper fortunes Her - father Mr Warwick Fairfax is governing director of the Sydney Morning Herald ' Miss Fairfax lives in Paris with her mother drove her car over the ferry route to visit friends in London MISS FAIRFAX TO-DAY Drove csr from Pari Incidental intelligence A FANATIC Is one who cant change his mind and wont change the subject— Winston Churchill Quoted in the United Nations World New York a i ‘ behind the

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