The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on October 20, 1955 · Page 51
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 51

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Thursday, October 20, 1955
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Page 51
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RIGHT irim Poland China barrow was named grand champion ( of Ihe National Barrow show. He was shown by Oscar Anderson and Sons, Leland, 111. This animal was pur. chased by Western Buyers. BELOW i» the champion Hampshire boar of the show. He sold for $4,300. Owner was John B. Broek, Sioux Cenler, Iowa. Buyer was Chinquapin Farms, Tryon. N. C. Sam Broek is at right; manager Peter Mather of Chinquapin Farm at left. > HOG NEATNESS IS EASY TO IMPROVE (BUT PORK RAISERS MUST MAKE PLANS TO GET RESULTS) (Cuts Courtesy Wallace's Farmer) BOTH ABOVE WINNERS ARE MEAT-TYPE HOGS , . . AND MEAT-TYPE HOGS BRING PREMIUM PRICES .SAYS:-.-..,-- ...... , ...- . , ..,.. : ;-..-. . . Gene Ferguson of Mahaska county, Iowa, has been working on meat type hogs for about four years. ^ He says, "I'm so choosy I had a hard time picking 60 gilts out of my 295 pigs." Then he adds, "A boar is still half the herd. So be prepared to pay a premium for meat type. You can spread the extra tost over a lot of pigs. Buying an ordinary boar at a community, sale is iust fooling yourself." ' ' "Pick a boar to fit the sows you have. Maybe you need to start with Landrace, Yorkshire or Tamworth. Or a cross of inbred hne$ that contains a high percentage of one of these. One of these can really lengthen your pigs." Improving the mealiness of hogs may be one of the easiest things Iowa hog producers have to do — if they do it right, according to Ralph Durham, extension animal husbandman at Iowa State College. He says one of the first things to remember is, although the old saying went, "The boar is half the herd," he is still only half. Good sows are important too. Keep On-lhe-Farm Records One of the first places to start making improvements is on the farm, Durham says. It means keeping on-the-farm records so that you can select and keep as breeding stock tho pigs (hat have the ability to survive and produce under practicial farm conditions. ( It's important. Durham says, to identify individual pigs and it's not hard. He says a request to the Agricultural Extension Service will bring you directions for an ear-marking system that is simple and easy to use He says earmarking is a must for the producer who means to improve the quality of his market Pigs. A simple litter record cord can also be obtained from the Extension Service, he says. It will enable you to recognize the fast- growing meaty lines of breeding in your swine herd. Hi.- says three steps are necessary for on-the-farm swine breeding improvement: (1) litter record cards. (2) ear notching and (3)full feeding of the breeding stock. Base Cullirig on Records Durham says the breeding stock should be fed just like you are going to fe£d the descendants. By full feeding the breeding stock you find it easy to recognize the ones-thai get "over-fat. Your culling program can then be based on records of rate of gain and leaness of the pork the animal is producing. These'two provide u good breed-selection balance. Durham suggests, culling first from your herd the slow growers. Then by backfat measurements, select from the faster-growers the ones that are well muscled without too much fat. He says the college Extension is contemplating setting up an on-lhi'-farm testing program with tin- help of local swine producers' organizations. A central testing station is only part of the answer to the problem of producing good market hogs, Durham says. You can do a lot of this work on the farm. WHATEVER THE HOG MARKET MAY BE MEAT-TYPE HOGS BRING PORK RAISERS A PREMIUM PRICE Western Buyers Will Come To Your Farm And Tell You Your Amount of Premium. Just Call Us at 107 And We'll Be Out. You'Can Deliver To Us Any Day Of Week. GET PREMIUM PRICES - RAISE MEAT-TYPE. | OCTOBER IS "EAT MORE PORK" MONTH | Your Best Buy In Meat Today Is Pork - Nutritious, Economical YOUR BEST MARKET IS WESTERN BUYERS SfUIN© TO ©VIR 200 PROCI5SORS OF PH0NI 1Q7 IOWA Cfje Slgorra Upper Be* jttome* ALGONA, IOWA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1955 Algona In Homecoming Tilt Open Date For ~ Bulldog is With la. Falls Next By Don Smilh Jr. Clarion's long - range scoring asts wrecked Algona's Home- oming celebration, 26-7, at the fairgrounds Friday night before a large crowd of hopeful fans. The loss left the Bulldogs in the Worth Central Conference cellar still searching for their first win. Coach Loving's banged-up crew has an open dale tomorrow night, then travels lo Iowa Falls for another conference game Friday night, Oct. 28. The Cadets have proven to be one of the surprise outfits in the league and will be fighting to remain in the race for the title. Clarion went in front to stav the first time it got the ball. Alp^na received the opening kickoff, gained eight yards in three plays, so Doug Meyer punted to the Cowboys and they got underway from their own 38 vard line Six running plays, with "Don Wit- 7.el and Jack McClelland carrying the mail, moved the ball to the Algona 35, where it was third and eleven to go. McClelland fired J a pass to Maynard Mosher who went all the way to make it 6-0. The conversion attempt failed ,-but Clarion was in front with jless than six minutes of play gone in the quarter. I Clarion's Second Tally Clarion's second touchdown march against the poor-tackling Bulldogs began shortly before the end of the first period. The drive got underway from the Clarion 29 yard b'ne and followed a Meyer punt. Two passes ate up 28 yards as the Cowboys moved to Algona's 31 at the buzzer. Seven plays into the second stanza, Neal Thompson dived over from the Algona one yard line to make it 12-0. McClelland passed to Thompson for the extra point to make it 13-0. Algona couldn't move after the ensuing kickoff, so once again punted. Clarion got TD number three in three plays that covered a total of 53 yards. Witzcl counted on an end run from the AJ- gona 44 to make it 19-0. Almost six minutes remained in the half, and the Bulldogs almost made the most of it. The locals took the kick-off, and with Meyer carrying the mail six times and passing to Rod Kickbush for 2K yards, moved to Clarion's 14 yard line. The drive was thwarted \ when Thompson intercepted a oass on the eight and returned to ihe 11. The half ended two plays later with Clarion in front, 19-0. Clarion's superiority at this point was shown by the fact the visitors had 192 yards rushing ind passing to 70 for Algona. Last Half Different The last half went to Algona. but the Bulldogs managed only one TD. Algona threatened three .imes during the third quarter, but couldn't dent Clarion's armor o score. The first drive went to Clarion's six where the Cowboys held. Clarion couldn't advance past its own 33 yard line during the entire 12 minutes. A short Cowboy march which in 26. went to the Algona 35 early ... the fourth period died when Jim Cowan intercepted a pass on the Algona 20 and ran it out to the The Bulldogs were off to the races. Meyer flipped to Kickbush for seven yards to get things going. Meyer's next throw fell harmlessly, but he carried for four and a first down on the 37. Another incomplete pass, follow * ~ i*"-"- 1 ! *«--**u»v- A ua. ^JctSMJlg Oi; ed by Cowan's five yard run and Yds. rushing _Yll3 Meyer's five yard blast put the ball on the Algona 47. The Cowboys were penalized five and Cowan romped through for 13 to put the ball on the Clarion 35. Co\van got five, Meyer seven and Dave Richardson two. putting the ball on the 21 where it was second and eight to go. Meyer faded, saw Bob Jensen neai the five and fired. A Clarion defender came in to intercept, tipped the ball in the air and Jensen grabbed it for a first down Cowan bulled the final five yards for the TD and Meyer place- kicked the extra point to make it 19-7, with 8's minutes left to play'. Clarion's Final Score That was just enough time for Clarion to add its final six-pointer. Starting from their own 40, seven plays did the job. Witzel got the touchdown with a twisting run for 39 yards as the buzzer sounded. His pass to Thompson for the extra point was good. Except for the final drive, Clarion was buffaloed by Algona in the last half, as the Bulldogs pulled an about-face on defense Offensively, the team picked up in the final 24 minutes also, but didn't have the necessary punch to produce the long plays which would have paid off with touchdowns. Potential Algona pass receivers were troubled with butter-fingers at times, but the biggest problem seemed to be blocking in >he line. Meyer, as usual was the offensive king-pin. He accounted for 134 of Algona's total of 172 yards rushing and passing. Witzel averaged 9.4 yards a crack as he rolled for 160 yards on 17 tries during the night for the Cowboys. 236 4-41. 2-34.3 70 1 25 Tot. yds gained 172 Kickoff ave. 2-42 Punt ave. 4-34. Yds. kicks ret. 68 Fumbles lost 0 Yds. penalized 25 Standings W L T Webster City 5 o 0 Humboldt 3 ] o Hampton 2 1 1 Iowa Falls 220 Eagle Grove 2 2 0 Clarion 2 3 0 Clear Lake l 4 o Algona 0 4 1 Results last week _ Humboldt 27, Clear Lake 0; Webster City 27, Eagle Grove 18; Hampton 12, Iowa Falls 7. Statistics A First downs n Passes attempted 20 Passes completed -- 4 Passes int. by l Yds. int. ret. 6 Yds. passing C 9 9 4 1 3 64 222 17 At Irvington Homemaker Club The Irvington Homemakers club held their October meeting at the new home of Mrs Bernard Capes! us with Mrs Gilbert Hargreaves and Mrs Glen Gabrielson as ro- lostesses. Seventeen members answered roll call. Mrs Glen Peglow was a guest. Mrs Howard Raney conducted a Dnef business meeing. Mrs Clarence Siemer had charge of the music and group singing. A report on World Trade and its importance was given by Mrs J C Mawdsley. A report o"n Germany by Mrs Vern Daley and Japan b'v Mrs Roland Haas helped conclude the lesson on World Trade. After a lunch and surprise number, Mrs Capesius conducted a tour through her newly completed home. The next meeting will be with Mrs Henry Eisenbarth and her committee instead of the previously announced meeting place. More Sports On Page 2 — This Section NEW POWER! Short Stroke power in every model... and at no extra cost! New '56 engines pve you power increases up to 26?v. You get colling faster, have more reserve powerl NEW SAFETY and COMFORT! New un ve* ized Cab comfort, plus ths protection of Ford'* exclusive safety features . . . new Lifeguard Btet-ring wheel, and door latches! NEW CARRYING CAPACITY throughout th, line. New Ford F-600 "lV<-tonner." for ex* 15>000 * lb More Horsepower per Dollar in new FORD TRUCKS for'5$ Ford Trucks for '56 give you a choice of eight modern Short Stroke engines—seven Y-8'a and a Six—from 133 to 200 h.p.I Only Ford has Superior Short Stroke power in every truck! The result: less power waste, greater gag savings, less wear on moving part*, longer, lower-cost engine life. Choose from over 280 models— from Pickups to BIG JOBS I Shown: new Ford P-100 8-ft. Eipre*.' Gives you more unable power, Y-a or Su, than any other truck In itf clad*. It iooJn Ui« leader, tog| •ok« el tract* tat* M *•* M Ikon M Trtqf yourself to America's easiest-driving Pickup-with Fordomatic! tOptfwal «t (xtra CM!. Only Ford gives you all these new end exclusive feature! Ford Trucks are first with safety first in new Driveri&d Cabs! Only Ford gives you so many safety features . . . tubeless tires now standard on all models. Jn no other truck engine will you find the complete combination of sodium-cooled exhaust valves, self-sealing intake valves, and other long-life features that you get in today's heavy-duty Ford Truck engines. NEWI 8-ft. F-100 Express for bulky loads, tvafUUt •« GVW HEWI 12- volt electrical system for better Cold-VMthaa NEW! Master-Guide Power Steering now *v«Babla OB Forward HfWI Full- wrap rear window for Miter backjnff «•»«•.. maneuvering. lo v »$tr a cost. New fuil-w?mpv&2iUi2( 1,000 tqu«j-« inches £ML if ^^^" •^ ^^ TAUl KENT MOTOR CO. PHQNI 4J4 MOJi

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