Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on September 16, 1970 · Page 39
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Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 39

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Wednesday, September 16, 1970
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Bues, Cubs, Mets Continue NL East Juggling Act By Associated Press One, two, three. The Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago Cubs and New York Mets are doing their number. Hie names and places may change . . . but the characters usually remain the same. Willie Stargell stayed in character with a three-run homer that powered Pitlsbiugh over Philadelphia 8-3; Billy Williams did his hitting thing to pace Chicago over St. Louis 5-3 and Montreal tripped New York 5-4 on an uncharacteristic bad pitch by Jerry Koosman in the National League’s dramatic East race Tuesday. The Pirates thus pulled a full game ahead of the Cubs and Mets, who changed places after Tuesday’s developments. Chicago is now second, less than a percentage point over third place New York. “I liked the way we bounced back after Sunday’s game,” said Pirate Manager Danny Murtaugh, referring to Pittsburgh’s 3-2 loss at Chicago when Matty Alou dropped a two-out fly in the ninth, ‘‘we disregarded Sunday and went out and played like nothing happened.” Williams, who capped that rally Sunday with a two-run double, took advantage of another misplayed ball to drive in the tie- breaking run Tuesday with a sixth-inning, single. “To win, you have to take advantage of the breaks,” said Williams And Koosman, who let Tuesday’s game get away by gifting the Expos with a wild-pitch tying run in the l(rth before they scored the clincher, had this refrain: “I’ll probably replay that last wild pitch throughout the winter. It’s the type of thing you can’t forget.” Houston rolled over West Division — pacing Cincinnati 9-2, San Francisco hammered Atlanta 8-0 and the Los Angeles Dodgers edged San Diego 5-4 in other National Leagues games. In the American League, New York swept a twi-night doubleheader from Boston 8-6 and 3-2; Baltimore turned back Washington 6-2; Cleveland beat Detroit 4-3; Minnesota won the opener of a doubleheader frorri California 7-5 and the Angels took the second game 5-3; and Milwaukee and Oakland split a pair — LINCOLN, NEB., WED., SEPT. 16, 1970-P.M. PAGE 43 the Brewers taking the opener 1-0 and the A’s the second game 6-5. Rain washed out Chicago at Kansas City. Bill Mazeroski, who had a solo homer along with Rich Hebner in Pittsburgh’s long-ball offense at Philadelphia, expressed sentiments similar to Murtaugh’s. “We could have had a letdown after Sunday,” the Pirates* magic-glove second baseman said, “it could have worked either way ... but it worked for the best.” Stargell’s 30th homer off Barry Lersh got Pittsburgh off to a 3-0 lead in the first and Hebner and Max jolted successive homers in the fifth. The Cubs and Cards were 2-2 after five innings of their game when Glenn Beckert lifted a fly ball to right. Rookie Luis Melendez came charging in, stopped and retreated only to have the ball fall behind him for a windblown double. Two pitches later, Williams singled home Beckert to snap the tie and the Cubs never looked back. “When I’m going good, it doesn’t make any difference who’s pitching,” said Williams, vvbo also singled home an insurance run in the seventh. “You don’t get too many breaks from teams like the Cardinals, the Pirates or the Dodgers. They play sound, fundamental baseball. So if they make a mistake, you'd better jump on it or you won’t get another opportunity.” John Bateman’s bases-loadcd single capped Montreal’s two-run rally in the 10th that wiped out Tommy Agee’s go-ahead homer in the top of the frame. “Koosman had good control tonight,” said New York Manager Gil Hodges. “He just started out wild in the 10th. We just couldn’t close the game out—that’s all.” Talking about the wild pitch that scored pinch-runner Boots Day, Kossman said: “The ball never got to the plate. It was an 0-2 pitch that 1 didn’t want to throw down the pike. It just bounced in the dirt. There was a chance for a play at the plate if the throw had been better. Duffy Dyer had to hurry his throw ... and I had to reach back for it.” After Day got the tying run in, Koosman intentionally walked Rusty Staub and Ron Fairly to fill the bases. Bateman then came through with the game-winner off reliever Ron Herbel. Doug Rader unloaded a three-run homer in Houston’s four-run fourth and the Astros went on to defeat the Reds, giving Larry Dierkcr his 14th victory. Gaylord Ferry pitched his third straight shutout for the Giants as he stopped slugging Atlanta on four hits. Manny Mota capped a two-run rally with a ninth-inning, run-scoring single to center that gave the Dodgers their comeback victory over the Padres. Steelers Give Up On End By Associated Press For one of the National Football League’s top wide receivers, Willie Richardson is running a pretty crazy pattern before the 1970 season begins. The 30-year-old veteran caught 43 passes and averaged 15 yards a catch with Baltimore last season. That was good enough to get him traded to Pittsburgh for Roy Jefferson, last year’s third best pass catcher with 67 receptions. Then there was a brief walk out of the Steelers’ camp in a 'money squabble. He signed his contract, and he caught only four passes for 62 yards in three pre-season games. So, Willie Richardson was on the move again Tuesday, this time to the Miami Dolphins. But the price for him now is only a high draft pick in 1971. That price might be well worth it for the Dolphins, who already gave up their top 1970 pick—which turned out to be quarterback Mike Phipps to Cleveland for ace receiver Paul Warfield, to go with their blooming young quarterback Bob Griese. Pittsburgh coach Chuck Noll explained the latest Richardson move by saying “I feel Richardson is most effective when he can play regularly and it would have been hard for him to play on this basis in Pittsburgh.” Richardson apparently had been beaten out of the starting job by rookie Ron Shanklin, a second round pick from North Texas State; second year man J. R. Wilburn, and Hubie Bryant, another rookie. Without him, the Steelers still managed their best pre-season showing in many years with a 4-1 record. Richardson wasn’t the only one moving Tuesday as NFL teams made their final cut to 40 players before the season openers this weekend. However, many of the others didn’t know where they would go next. Like George Mira, the veteran quarterback. Mira was cut by the Eagles, who are attempting to trade him. The Eagles decided to keep rookie Rick Arrington, a free agent from Tulsa who looked good against Houston locf wpp I c Another veteran to get pink slips was Tom Nowatzke, Detroit’s No. 1 draft choice in 1965 and a starter in the backfield several years ago. He failed in an attempted switch to linebacker. The Lions also cut rookie linebacker Ken Geddes of Nebraska. Veteran running back Terry Cole was cut by Baltimore, and wide receiver Bake Turner, who grabbed 191 passes for 3,000 yards in seven years with the New York Jets, but lost his starting job in 1966, decided to retire. He will continue his career as a folk singer. PhlUdtlphia Eafllts. - guard Bob Parker and defensive back Bo Burris, waived quarterback George Mira. Cleveland Browns — Waived running back Charley Leigh and Ben Davis, Dean Brown and Tom Schoen. Baltimore Colts waived running backs Roland Moss and Jyry Cole, ti^ht end Ara Person and linebacker Dick ’**Mliinesota Vikings - Cut linebacker Mike McCaffrey, Knief, quarterback Kent Nix and defensive back Tom Brown. . u ■ n u Houston Oilers — Cut quarterback Bob Naponic, defensive end Charles Blossom, running Back Bill Dusenbery and wide receiver Paul Zeaske. New York Jets - wide receiver Bake Turner, retired; cut defensive back Cecil Leonard, guard Tom Bayless and offensive lineman Paul Seiler. * ^ ^ Pittsburgh Steelers - Traded wide receiver Willie Richardson to Miami Dolphins for a 1971 draft choice. San FranclKO 4*ers—Cut wide receiver Leo Johnson, defensive back John Woltt and lineback Carter Campbell. New Orleans Saints — Put on the reserve list linebackers Gary Klahr and Greg Cureton, defensive tackle Mike Rengel and defensive back Glenn Cannon. Removed from injured list linebackers Wayne Colman and Harold Hays and safety Mel Easley. Acquired running back Claxton Welch on waivers from Dallas. Detroit Lions — Cut linebacker Tom Nowatzke, defensive „t»=1e Dave Haverdick, linebacker Ken Geddes and guard Rockey Rasiey. Los Angeles Rams — Cut veterans de'»-s<ve end Gregg Schunacner, deiensive tackle Lane Howell, Clark K’ .'<tr 4 ncl rooki« running back Jtn J^roan. Cornhuskers To Sport New Look on Defense UPI TELEPHOTO Charlie (Devil) Green tries to avoid two-time heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson after both fighters slipped and hit the canvas in New York Tuesday night. Referee Tony Perez moves in. By DON FORSYTHE With an eye toward c o m- batting Southern California offensive strength Nebraska’s top defensive unit will have a new look Saturday night against the Trojans. Junior tackle Larry Jacobson, sophomore end Willie Harper and sophomore cornerback Joe Blahak have been promoted to the Black Shirt unit in moves which coach Bob Dcvaney says are “probably permanent” for the use game. Jacobson, at fi-6 and 247 pounds, offers more size and experience at the left tackle spot than Rich Glover, a 225- pound sophomore who opened there against Wake B'orest. Jacobson missed spring practice because of knee surgery, but has made steady progress this fall and had some good plays in the opener. Harper’s quickness and pass rushing ability have earned him a shot at the No. 1 right end spot ahead of John I’itts. Speed also plays a part in Blahak’s promotion as he’s one of the quickest men in the defensive backfield corps. Defensive backfield coach Warren Powers has looked at new combinations on both the first and second units. John Decker, who started at the left Larry Jacobson Joins No. 1 Defense corner against Wake Forest, Is being given work at the monster spot behind Dave Morock and will be ready to play either spot this weekend. Shifting to the left corner .spot on the No. 2 unit is Gary Hollstei'n, who had alternated with Tom McClelland a.«? the No. 2 safety. McClelland remains at safety and Paul Rogers handles the right corner in the alternate backfield. One spot which remains unsettled is defensive left end. “I’m not sure who will start there. It could be John Adkins, John Hyland or Doug John­ son.” says Devaney. Adkins worked with the No. 1 defense Tuesday after Hyland had the spot Monday. Glover is being given work at right tackle this week because of the knee injury suffered by Tom Robison in the opener. Veteran Dan Malone was at the left tackle spot and Glover on the right side with the No. 2 unit Tuesday. “We'll make a decision on Robison and Bob Wolfe (tight end) Wednesday,” said Devaney. Neither took part In Tuesday’s drills. Also absent was Van Brownson, bat Dcvaney said that the junior quarterback would work on handoffs Wednesday and try passing again Thursday. “If he can’t play we won’t take him to California,” said Devaney. .Meanwhile Jerry Tagge's ailing leg continue.s to improve and Devaney looks for him to bo at full speed for the USC game. Again Tuesday the *vorn- buskers worked out on the AstroTurf. “We’ll try to go on the grass Wednesday, Thursday night and again Friday,” said Dcvaney. The Thursday night workout will be held under the lights at Seacrcst Field. Thursday POST TIME 3:00 P.M. First race, purse $400. 2-year-old maidens, allowance, 5 furlongs. Larry's Delight (No Boy) .....................]15 Betsy Loris (No Boy) .......................... 115 Marine Vixen (Stallings) ......................1'2 Sound Smoke (King) .............................1]5 Amotan (No Boy) .................................. Whoa Rube (Anderson) ..........................iiS Faithful Throw (Ray) ...........................US Also: Abbys Apogee (No Boy) 112. Second race, purse $SOO, 3-year-olds, claiming $1,500, 5 furlongs. Mandy's Lark (Armstrong) .................112 Mr. Sew N Sew (Barnes) ....................115 Mr. Gender (L. Turner) ........................I S Mae Bust (Ray) ......................................117 Legal Lark (Coleman) .................115 Galalourou (Anderson) ..................112 Sweet Erma (King) ...............................J12 Pumper (Long) .......................................1'5 Also: Annie Bomb (Anderson) 112, Happy Clementine (Anderson) 112. Third race, purse $400, 2-year-old maidens, allowance, 5 furlongs. Dusky Ruler (Stallings) .........................115 Im Twiggie (Anderson) .........................J|2 Precious Doe (Caniglia) ........................|j5 Rusty Gray (King) ............................... |15 Precious Butch (Long) .......................^^19? Miss Towley (No Boy) ..........................]|5 Good 01 Dix (No Boy) ..........................115 Barmingo (Barnes) .................................H5 Rythmn Peel L. Turner) ..................... Fourth race, pursa $500, 4-year-olds and up, claiming $1,500, 7 furlongs. Happy Deer (Anderson) .....................115 Valley's Girl (Ray) .................................¡15 Mont Clair (King) .................................. » Prince Samurai (L. Turner) ................118 Rain Bird (Long) ...............................xxlll Saint Tim's (Stallings) ..........................118 Annie Ross (Perez) ...............................11$ Fitth race, purse $700, 3-year-oid$, claiming $2,500, 5 furlongs. Seam's Foxy (Coleman) ........................113 Angel Forest (Stallings) ........................114 Zeke The Shiek (Barnes) .......................118 Windsor Miss (J. Rettele) ................... 113 City Dad (Ray) .......................................114 Dance Note (Perez) ................................118 Swantina (No Boy) ................................113 Sixth race, purse $700, 4-year-olds and up, claiming $1,500-1,200, 5 furlongs. Rator Marble (Armstrong) ...................122 Seven Pilots (King) ...............................114 Darkies John (Stallings) .................... 119 Winner's Dream (Coleman) ..................114 Little Jetson (Barnes) ............................114 Little Blue Lac>y (Ray) ...........................113 Launching Pad (Anderson) ...................Ill Seventh race, purse $000, 4-year-oldt and up, claiming $2,500, 7 furlongs. All The Same (Barnes) .........................118 Jr's Kitty (Long) ...............................xxlll Lucky Para Dice (No Boy) ..................121 Traveling Fast (Anderson) ....................118 Swell Pal (Coleman) ..............................118 Bit Of Cheat (Stallings) .......................112 Roving Tigress (L. Turner) ..................]18 Eighth race, purse $700, 4-year-old« and up, claiming $1,500-$1,200, Vt furlongs. Hay Polly (Anderson) ............................. 114 Lucky Skip (Stallings) ............................ 119 Jay's Mark (Farris) ...............................II 3 Cleareye (King) ...................................... 119 Cincinnati Kid (Ray) ..............................II 9 Brackets (Barnes) ...................................122 Rythmn Peel (L. Turner) .....................119 XX—Seven pounds apprentice ailowance. Comeback Bid New York — “The next time I’ll be better. And the next time after that I’ll be even better. And whoever it is I fight it has to be in New York.” Floyd Patterson, his reflexes dulled by a two-year layoff and his skills diminished by his 35 years, still spoke oi the future Tuesday night after his lOth-round knockout over crude Charlie Green. “I was heavyweight champion twice,” said Patterson, the only man ever to regain the title, “and now what am I rated? . . . 20th, 30th or 40th? But now the applause I get is greater than I got then.” A crowd of 10,809 paying $72,985 gave him a roaring ovation. The future for Patterson probably means another bout with Jimmy Ellis later in the fall or possibly a fight with Oscar Bonavena from the Argentine. It will take at least six weeks for the cut over Patterson’s left eye to heal. Dr. Edwin Campbell of the New York State Athletic Commission, said it would take nine stitches to close the deep gash. Timing, Reflexes Were Off “I wasn’t sharp,” Patterson said. “My timing and reflexes were off. I was fast only in spurts. I was never hurt so I thought this was it.” “I didn’t think it was a knockout,” he said, “I thought he got up and it was a TKO. I didn’t expect to knock him out with that punch.” Referee Tony Perez called it a knockout as Green struggled to get to his feet at the count of 10. Perez warned Green for rabbit punching in the first, butting in the seventh and hitting on the break in the ninth. It appeared that a butt caused the cut in the fifth round. When he was asked if he would quit if he lost, Patterson replied in character, “I wouldn’t say quit. 1 would have called it a day.” Drug Charges Cloud Weightlifting Event American East Division Won Lost Pcf. Baltimore .............. 96 51 .563 New York .............. 83 ■ 65 .561 Detroit ............ 75 72 .510 Boston ............... 75 73 .507 Cleveland _____ 72 76 .486 Washington ............ 68 78 .466 West Division Minnesota 86 59 .599 Oakland 81 68 .544 California .78 69 .531 Kansas City 58 88 .397 Milwaukee 56 91 .381 Chicago .. 53 93.363 Tutsday's Results GB Baltimore 6, Washington 2 New York 8-3, Boston 4-2 Cleveland 4, Detroit 3 Minnesota 7-3, California 5-5 Chicago at Kansas City, rain Milwaukee 1-5, Oakland 0-6 Wednesday's Games Oakland (Segui 10-10) at Milwaukee (Krausse 13-16), night • Chicago (Janeski 10-15 and John 11-15) at Kansas City (Drago 8-14 and Butler 411), 2, twi-night California (May 6-13) at Minnesota (Biyleven 9-7), night Detroit (Lolich 12-17) at Cleveland (Paul 2-5), night Baltimore (Palmer 19-9) at Washington (GogolewskI 1-0), night Boston (Siebert 13-8) at New York (Peterson 17-10), night Thursday's Games Kansas City at Milwaukee, night California at Minnesota Detroit at Cleveland, night Baltimore at Washington, night Boston at New York Only games scheduled National East Pittsburgh Chicago New York St. Louis Philadelphia Montreal Division Won Lost 78 68 77 78 70 46 65 69 70 78 82 82 Pet. OB .534 .527 1 .527 1 .473 9 .446 1 3 .442 13',* Expert By VIRGIL PARKER Prep Sports Writer It’s human nature to say “I told you so” when you’re right about something. For some sU-ange rca.son it doesn’t seem quite right to say the .same thing when you’re wrong. But a week ago I pointed out the extreme hazard of trying to predict the outcome of opening weekend high school football games. Unfortunately that proved to be the most accurate prediction of them all. The tendency was to choose a team on its record of the year before. Take Republican City as an example. The Warriors were 7-3 a season ago, including an easy win over opening game foe Ruskin. The choice wai obvious. But it turns out that of the 11 seniors at Republican City last year, nine of them — including all-stater Ryan Hawley — were boys. Things are a little more balanced this year. Needless to say, Ruskin was the winner. Last Year’s Marks Doii'l Coiml ’ Has Trouble Parker’s Picks ^ Page 4.* But tliat wasn’t too bad. The score was just 26-20. How about a couple of the other picks! There was Ixtomis, a supposed winner, which lost to Overton, 54-6. and Mc*Cool Junction, which squeezed through with a 53-6 victory over “favored” Rising City. They didn’t all turn uut that way. Of the 136 games played by 11-man teams, we had 93 correct for a .684 average. Of the eight-man games it was 26 correct of 39 played, or .667. That gave an overall result of 119 picks out of the 175 games, or .680, which at least was better than two out of three. Now the hope is that with the first week results upon which to judge, the average will improve. L i n c o 1 n Northeast-Lincoln .Southeasl, Friday niylit, Seacrcst Field — The first of the fall’s intra-city iîaincs. Southeast, scoring 2.1 {Kiints away fmm home again.sl North Platte, rates the call. The Rockets showed promise against Fremont, however. Hastings at Lincoln East, Satiirdcty night, tk’acrcst Field — Spartan coach l>ce Zcntic said hli team might nut win as many games as a year ago but that they’d .score a lot of points. He was right the first week. Though losing to Grand Island in the final minutes. East tallied 28. That will be enough to win this time. Lini-oln High at ScotLsbluff -> It’s a long way to travel for a win. but two years ago the Links did it and wound up state champions. Creighton Prep-Bellcvue, Saturday night, at Burke -- The two Metrt) League favorites tangle on the second w»*ek. Prep, the defending state champ, was a 3<V- 6 winner over Ilummel last Friday. Bellevue trounced Weslsidc, 4b-6 The winner will b«* in a good lK)sttion to annex this year’s crown. Att events free ualeei foOoiPid - bgr •: aU tUnee aan. im I mb bold- faeod for p.m. Thursday state Horse Racing—Madison, 3.* Columbus, Ohio (^A mini cold war hovered over the World Weightlifting Championships Wednesday after officials Tuesday night disqualified five competitors—-all from Iron Curtain countries—on charges of taking stimulants. Delegation leaders from the Soviet Union, Poland and Hungary, the nations whose weightlifters were disqnalified, threatened to quit the championships and take their squads home. Among those charged with taking the stimulant phenylethylamine were Sandor Holczrciter of Hungary, who won the 1970 flyweight crown on the opening night Saturday. Of the first three finishers in the flyweight and bantamweight divisions, only bantamweight king Mohammad Nassiri was not stripped of his medal. Disqualified after urine specimen tests proved positive, in addition to Holczreiter, were flyweights Walter Szoltysek of Poland and V. Smetanin of the USSR and bantamw<!|hls Imre Foldi of Hungary and Henry Trebicki of Poland. The Associated Press learned Polls’ Mecislav Nowak and Jan Wojnowski, 1-2 in the featherweight lifting Monday night, would be disqualified for the .same reasons. Wejt Division CifKinnafi 93 57 .620 Los Angeles 80 47 .544 11V* San Francisco . 79 69 . 534 13 Houston ................... 71 76 .483 20',* Atlanta 72 /8 . 480 21 San Diego 58 91 .389 34 * Tuesday's Result* Montreal 5, New York 4, 10 inning* Chicago 5, .St. Louts 3 Houston 9, Cincinnati ? San Francisco 8, Atlanta 0 Los Angeles 5. San Diego 4 Pittsburgh 8, Phlladelpnia 3 Wednesday's Games New York (Seaver 18-11) at Montrcel (Rcnko 1110), night Pittsburgh (Cambr a 0-2) at PhiladeN Dhia (Bunning 10-14). night St. Louis (Gibson 21-6) at Chicago (Pic­ oas 12-7) Cincinnati (Nolan 14-7) at Houston (Bla- síngame 3-2), night San Diego (Roberts 4-13) at Los Angeles (Moeller 7-7), night Atlanta (Nash )2I) at San Francisco (Marichal 11-10) Thursday's Gamas Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, night St. Louis at Chicago Houston at Los Angeles, night San Francisco at San Diego, night Only games scheduled Intrepid Declared Winner of Protest Peunaut Race At a Glance By Associated Fress Including Games ef Sept. IS National League test Te Won Lost Fct. Behind Flay 78 48 .5340 '4 77 49 ,5274 1 14 Chicago . New York 78 70 . 5270 1 14 Ptiiburgh igo Y l .. .......................- Pittsburgh At Home 7, Montr«*! 4 . New York 3; Away 9, Philadelphia 2, New York 4, St. Louii 3. Chicago At Heme 2, St Louis; Away 14, Montreal 4, St Lou.I 3, Philédelphiaî, NewYork4 New York At Home 8. Pittsburgh 4. Chicago 4, Away 4, Montreal Ph tadet- phia 2. P'ftsbwrgh. J Ncwj)ort. H I. iJ*“ Intrepid wa.s declared the winner Wednesday of the first yacht race for the America’s Cup after the race committee dismissed a protest of Australia’s Gretel II. The triumph officially gave the American yacht a 1-0 lead in the bcst-of-scven series which resumes Thursday. After deliberating overnight the race committee of the New York Yacht Club found that neither yacht had violated any racing rules in a near-collision seven minutes before the start of Tuesday’s race. Intrepid also had protested. Intrepid went on to win by 5 minutes, 52 seconds in a day of disastrous mishaps for the Aussie challenger. Devereux Barker, chairman of the NYYC Committee, said that Gretel H was on the starboard tack, giving her the right of way as .she approached Intrepid, which was on the port tack. When they were only 10 feet apart Grclcl II tacked away. The conunittee ruled that Gretel came under race rule No. 34 which transfers the right-of-way to a boat that has done all she could to keep clear. The protests were tlie first in Cup racing since 1934 when Britain’s Endeavor claimed foul against t h e American J-boat, Rainbow, also to no avail. Wednesday Ba%rball — Chicago at Kansa.s City. 7; 10 p m. <KLIN>. Feature Races At Rockingham Park Runson Ru>< Jessio's jmt On The Ple»s 410 3 10 3 0Q 4.20 3 00 2.90 Fmitball Ex-.Nebrask'j end Freeman While will be given a five-day trial with the Ottawa Rough Riders in Uie Canadian Football League. Stanford defensive guard Pete Lazetich has been named college Lineman of the Week by the Associated Press for his part in the 34-28 win over Arkansas. Texas Christian’s Bobby Davis was named the AP’s Back of the Week for play in his team’s 31-7 win over Texas- Arlinglon. The Green Bay Fackws have activated veteran offensive tackle Forrest Gregg. Bafrketbali The Denver Rockets have defied an American Basketball Association rule and started full-scale practice with Michigan State rookie Ralpb Simpson, whose contract the ABA had refused to honor.

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