The Laurel Ledger from Laurel, Mississippi on May 20, 1905 · Page 8
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The Laurel Ledger from Laurel, Mississippi · Page 8

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Laurel, Mississippi
Issue Date:
Saturday, May 20, 1905
Page:
Page 8
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j i . v ' Jt-TV i- -"-'_ g-s ·;.-..-:.. ms One f lower for the living is Worth a column of flattery for the dead. Because a woman is as pretty , as a picture it no proof that she's .painted. - A-mans famiiy never begins to ·appreciate him until he gets up in the world. Dame Fashion is altogether too fast for any sensible woman to run with. m^ m A man's idea of a reliable cook, .is one that doesn't t r y ' t o spring any cooking school delicacies on the family. Every once in a great while a man falls'in love and crawls out unassisted. ! · The best way of respecting some people is to keep away from them. us help having a good opinion of ourselves if "wo believe half we hear about,the rest of the' world? / . t - ' ' Love comes a beggar and departs a tyrant. Lots of men are not' crooked until they get in a strait. ' . Of course it hurts to be pinned down by the truth. If a woman couldn't cry her brain would soon be drowned. If more girls forgot to mail the letters they write they would have less to worry over. Lots of woman's heads are not as long as their tongues. She who cant hit a barn door can touch a bull's eye of masculine susceptibility every time she aims at his vanity. Happiness is like a woman; pretend nut to see' her and she will pursue you. The biggest thing about little men is the prejudices. And after a man gets through p;-.Inti:: 0 ' the town red he usually feels pretty hluo himself. He who will be examining the mouths of gift horses must not be surprised to find they have false teeth. generally fcv - -rf all of us got what we earned maybe some of us wouldn't be in such awful straits every time .the day to pay our board bills rolls around. Good Lord, how can some of One wild little bird in the* bush is worth a cage full of tame singing things in the hand. She who appreciates early, in the game just how far she can trust herself doesn't trust any man. Who ever came home from a New and attractive line of Dress tloocfrjust received and placed on sale this week. Latest styles in Organdies, Voiles and Tissues. Our Millinery Department is receiving new and attractive 'styles every day. r Our Ziegler Shoe talk-All the latest styles, Oxfords and Ties, White Canvas Shoes and S^nd- Doting Mothers and Fond Fathers naturally want their boy to be manly, to hold his head high among his mates, to'be independent, truthful and straight-forward always. . Mrs. JANE HOPKINS' BOY- PROOF CLOTHES are designed especially for little Americans of the wholesome type. They're cut of tested fabrics, made up in picked patterns and fashioned to be won- · derfully wear-withstanding. Prices? More moderate than you'd suppose for a brand -of such re, nown. "··· ' ·Have your boy call at our dealers and learn about the Prize Story Contest. Edwin Clapp and Walkover s Shocs. . '.' - - . ' i ;' picnic without a new. and comprehensive iove for'Eye', .who by sinning her family o u t ' of the 'garden .'crowned them with the joy of honest work. Love that has to -knock longest usually lingers longest.--C. M. in N. O. Picayune. - QENERAL CROP SUMMARY for the Week Ending Monday, ' 'MaylSth. A BIG LAND DEAt Generally cloudy .and warm | weather N prevailed during t h e ] week with moderate to. heavy j showers in the western and north- rn counties and light showers over the eastern and southern, ounties. The mean temperature for the week was about five degrees above normal in the western portion of the state and about' nine degrees above normal in the eastern portion. Favorable conditions prevailed over the southern half of the state, where planting is nearing completion and croos show good stands and are making a rapid growth; chopping.cotton is in full progress and much corn has been given its first plowing. ,, Over the northern half of the state upland crops generally show satisfactory stands and are growing well, but many fields are be-, coming grassy as a result of frequent rains and lack of cultivation; the boil is still wet and many lowlands remain unplowed and unplanted wiCli the prospect that a few lowlands cotton fields will have to -be abandoned for season. In the northern one- third of the 'state only about three-fourths of the cotton has been'plantcd a n d in a number of northern counties comparatively a small a m o n n t of corn has been ''planted; Oats arc maturing rapidly and harvest has commenced south. ' Minor crops are generally doing well. Irish potatoes are very promising. Pastures'are in excellent condition. As a rule fruit prospects are only fair and a light crop of peaches is generally indicated'. Appreciates League. Hand Book. Eastman,' Gardiner Co. Dispose of 14,500 Acres. One of the biggest timber 'deals ,in the history of this section has just been cortsuraated, by'which Eastman, Gardiner/ Co., disposed of 14,500 acres of pine titn- b=r for $194,000. ;; . The.timber sold lies in the "Sullivari Hollow" district, south of the Gulf and Ship Island railroad. .The purchaser was W. S. F. Tatum, of Hattiesburg, acting as agent for the Lumber and Mineral Co., of Hot Springs, s N. C', which company owns the saw mill at Mt. Olive Jand has considerable other timber interests in that section. It will be interesting to know that Eastman, Gardiner Co., own at present 175,000 acres of the finest pine timber .in this state. A reasonable estimate of the value of this timber is $3,500,000. They are using up in their saw mill here about 5,000 acres per year. Of the 175,000 acres owned 150,000 acres of it, or enough to run the mill for twenty-five years, is sufficiently near Laurel to be manufactured into lumber at this place. They, too, are buying more pine land all the time. In the territory contiguous to Laurel this company owns upwards of 25,000 acres of stump lands. This' land has had the timber taken off and is the finest kind of farming land. It is their intention to put this land on the market soon at a price which will sell it, and will certainly induce a number of the right kind of immigrants to come to this section. Dissolution Notice^ The firm composed heretofore of Annis- Barfield has by mutual consent dissolved partnership. B. F. AtfNis, A. N. BARJIELD'. maker'' of Los "Angelea, California Kas.been paid $1,000 by the mer-;^: chants on a contract: to produce, : 18 inches of, rain by May' lati? He produced 19 inches. His method was generation and explosion of gasses. - v , , ; . F. A. King, -was a./ business v visitor to Wiggins Wednesday^;'.;: ';""· , . . -i - - " -i · ' · . · - ' ·'** - , ' · - " . . ; "··' 7; · . Mrs. James Morris an'ddaugh- ter, Miss Inez, of near Heidelberg,··: were shopping in Laurel ,Thura.- day..;---.. . : · · - . - · · . ' ' '.'".; : U : '- ; :' Henry Andersen and Dr. H. (;'; McCormick went to New Orleans:; Thursday for a few days .yisitV Dr. McGorinickwill attend some,; masonic ceremonies arid Mr. Ah-; dersen will look in on the Worlds , champion chess game in progress there.-. V - · ' · · " · . Miss Maud Pope, one of the' : Laurel teachers who ^has. been quite sick for severaU-w'eieks with/ fever, left this week for/her. old;. home at Pontotoc.Miss^-'.·":..' ;v Mrs. 'W. W. Heidelberg, of Heidelberg, was shopping in Laurel Thursday. ' . ! B. S. Shinn left Mbnday^for New Mexico, where .he ^bes'ih' the interest of his health.* Raleigh" Love spent Tuesday at Saratoga on a fishing trip. ;,' 1 [WJACKSONVIU* We are in receipt of'The Southern Truck Growers League Hand Book" and wish to say that the compiler deserves, at least, the best wishes of both shipper and receiver. We have as yet failed.to see anything in its line that covers all points pertaining to the marketing · of Fruits and Vegetables as thoroughly, and if shippers will be guided by the advice given, they will find their business more pro-; n'table than in the past. We thank you as well as compliment you on your work Yours respectfully Harshfie[d, Hile Go., When it is understood that the above doncern had an advertisement in the book, it will be known that their appreciation .was genuine. . Sam Abney, of Heidelberg, was in Laurel on business Monday. After this date the firm known as Patton Patrick will be known as W. P. Patrick. All accounts due them will be paid to W. P. Patrick and he assumes all debts due to other firms. W. P. PATRICK, JNO. W. PATTON. .May 13, 1905. J. T. Childers, a well-known citizen of the Sharon community, was a Laurel business visitor on Monday. ·· Born to · Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Consley Tuesday, May 17 a girl. Cecil Heidelberg, of Heidelberg was a Laurel business visitor Thursday. . ' Dr. S. A. Dantzler, F. W. Abney, J. R. Hassell ..and -.M. G. Travis were in 'Laurel enroute from Mobile to their home in Heidelberg last night. They had. been on a fishing excursion on Dog river. -They'report a good catch and a large iime. If you want to discuss the bond issue,, court house question, or anything of the kind, come in, order a meal that will suit you and talk to your-hearts content. T h e Star. - ' ' . ' . - · ' New Fast Trains ST. LOUIS ST. LOUIS LIMITED Leaves New Orleans 7:30 p. ST. LOUIS FLYER *" Leaves New Orleans 9:10 a. m. White Do vc Flour is the best. 'A car load'at Warrens. Through Sleepers to St. Louis. Superb Dining Car Service. (Meals a la carte.) Library Observation Cars. 229 TICKET OFFICE St. Charles, corner Gravier, opposite Telegraph offices. Phone Main- 3GS9-L. New Orleans, Louisiana. E. GUEDRY, U. P?A. WE CLEAN AND PRESS Ladies and gentlemen's gar- nioiii.i I e\ory description at reasonable prices. . . .jf. . / - v . . FOR $1.25 N PE|T MONTH nice order all the time by-bi coming a member of our pressO ing .club. . . . , . ' . ."·."-.. Crescent Cleaning Pressing 1 Club 604- OAK. STREET. , HARPER EAZELL, V Proprietors/ PURIFIES AND REGULATES A MARVELOUS MEDICINE FOR DISEASED KIDNEYS iMiStOftlMttaftlM PRICKLY |SM BITTERS wttfc the iNEWSPAPERl iWSFAPERl

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