Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on September 19, 1963 · Page 14
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 14

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Galesburg, Illinois
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Thursday, September 19, 1963
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Page 14
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14 Gotesburg Register-Moil, Golesburg, III, Thursday, Sept. 19, 1963 Kennedy Asks La Business To Exoort By SAM DAWSON NEW YORK (AP)-Prcsident Kennedy urges American manufacturers and farmers to sell $2 billion more of their products abroad each year. Or, to put it the other way, he wants foreigners to buy $2 billion more of American goods. He says Americans could increase the total of exports if they looked beyond home markets, put more hard-sell into their efforts abroad, and if they lowered prices to meet competition from oilier industrial countries. Foreigners presumably could find the money to buy more from us by buying less from our competitors, and by using more of the dollar assets they pile up from sales of their goods and raw materials to us and from our foreign aid and other federal spending programs, and from dollars received as private investment overseas by Americans. In spite of all the forebodings about growing foreign competition, U.S. export totals have been growing year by year. They came to $20.5 billion in 1962. American business has been able to expand many of its markets and hold others because of superior product, service, or efficiency of manufacturing and distribution. It has done so in the face of rising production costs at home, sharply contrasted to generally lower production costs (particularly labor) in the fast rising industrial lands of Western Europe and Japan. The rub has come from this: While the total of exports has grown, the share of the world's markets has fallen. U.S. exports were still expanding, but those of other nations were increasing much faster. Rising wages and other production costs in Europe have led many Americans to believe that the price advantage some European products have in world markets was shrinking. But statistics issued by the Commission of the European Economic Community show that while prices paid by the consumers in Europe are rising, the prices on exported goods have gone up very little. President Kennedy has told American producers they might try the same thing—boost exports by producing more and keeping prices low. instead of the other way around. FAT OVERWEIGHT Available to you without a doctor's prescription, our drug called ODRINEX. You must lose ugly fat In 7 days or your money back. No strenuous exercise, laxatives, massage or taking of so-called reducing candies, crackers or cookies, or chewing gum. ODRINEX is a tiny tablet and easily swallowed. When you take ODRINEX, you still enjoy your meals, still eat the foods you like, but you simply don't have the urge for extra portions because ODRINEX depresses your appetite and decreases your desire for food. Your weight must come down, because as your own doctor will tell you, when you eat less, you weigh less. Get rid of excess fat and live longer. ODRINEX costs $3.00 and is sold on this GUARANTEE: If not satisfied for any reason just return the package to your druggist and get your full money back. No questions asked. ODRINEX is sold with this guarantee by: Hawthorne Drug Stort, IS E. Main. Mail Orders Filled THIS IS REAL FREIGHT—Most people have watched heavily laden freight trains go by, but it is doubtful if many have seen one carrying a gigantic load like this. You would have to be an aeronautical engineer or a worker for the Southern Pacific to recognize that the eerie caravan is a dismantled wind tunnel,' spread over six flatcars. Great size of the pieces is indicated by figure of a man (arrow). ~ Most Offices Being Used As Pawnshop By HAL BOYLE NEW YORK (AP)—The average business office today is a pawnshop without the usual gilt throe-ball sign. "Neither a borrower nor a lender be," wrote Shakespeare, a bit of advice from the bard that is honored more in neglect than in observance. The employes of most firms spend at least part of the working day borrowing from each other, and the custom has many social as well as financial advantages. It helps them to pass the time, it improves their arithmetic, it enables them to find out who their real friends are (if any), and it keeps alive some wastrels who might otherwise starve between paydays. While office borrowing isn't universal, it is practically so. A crisp new $5 bill, loaned to one person in the morning, may travel briefly through half a dozen pockets before nightfall — as it is borrowed and reborrowed. Sometimes it even winds up in the same pocket from which its journey started. If you look around your own office, you may find the following types of white collar borrowers farr'iai: "The competitor" — If he sees you lend $3 to someone, he immediately asks you for $6 — because he can't stand to see anybody else get ahead of him at anything. "The tragedian" — Before he makes his touch, he breaks your heart with a tale of woe. "All I want is carfare and enough to buy one red rose," he weeps. "My daughter is having her adenoids out, and I want to visit her in the hospital." "The grand evader" — "Don't bother me with trifles," he says loftily when you ask him humbly for the $25 he has owed you since Christmas. "I'm working on a deal now that'll make us both rich." "The compulsive wheedler" — If you don't have any ready cash, he'll borrow anything else you have. It's a matter of pride with this guy never to go away empty handed. "The hypochondriac"—You can SAVE AT REED'S SPECIAL GROUP Ladies 1 Heels Never a greater bargain on preseason fhoe*. REEDS SELF SERVICE Large selection of styles and sizes. SHOES 328 East Main St. (Former Oico Location) OPIN MONDAY and FRIDAY 'til 9 P.M. Othtr Pays 'til 5:30 P.M. keep your money. It's your medicine this fellow wants. "The pyramid artist" — On payday he pays you the $5 he borrowed, and the next day he borrows $10. He keeps building up his debt this way until, when he is fired at the end of the year, he leaves with you holding the sack for $10. Stan Musial is the first major league baseball player to play 1,000 games at each of two positions. He has played more than 1,000 at first base and 1,800 in the outfield. Clergy Tour Hospital CINCINNATI (AP) - Longview State Hospital initiated a "Clergymen's Day" this year to better acquaint local clergy with the services offered at a mental institution. It's to be an annual event. Besides a tour, exhibits, and a talk by the superintendent, the pastors Were conducted by the patients themselves on a visit to the hospital's reecptinn-treatment center. New Windsor Church Group Picks Officers NEW WINDSOR-Mrs. Wayne Hickok, president; Mrs. David Robertson, Vice president; Mrs. Francis Petrie, secretary, and Mrs, Donald Crawford, treasurer, were re-elected officers of the United Presbyterian Women at the meeting of the organization Friday. Mrs. J. W. Robb conducted the opening devotions on the theme "Prayer." It was decided that the three guilds combine for the Oct. 23 meeting set for 7:30 p.m. Mrs. Paul Holmer, a former missionary to India, will review the book "Take My Hands," a book written about that country. Mrs. Robb, Mrs. Crawford and Mrs. Earle Nelson were appointed local church service committee. A prayer retreat was announced to be held Sept. 18 at 9 am. to 1 p.m. at the Presbyterian Moline Retreat Area. In case of rain the event will be held at the Presbyterian Church in Moline. Oct. 15 was announced as the final day for used clothing to be sorted at the C. E. Building. Mrs. Atlee Brown, chairman of church world service, is in charge of the shipment of the clothing overseas. Mrs. Robb reported on the offerings received through the "least coin." New Windsor Briefs Mr. and Mrs. Robert Aldrich and three children have arrived from the Edgewood Arsenal in Maryland. Aldrich who is a specialist 5. in the Marine Corps is a career man PUBLIC SCHOOL SPENDING BY STATES *}*, MA*. $465 ••$447 NN.$S22 NJ. $554 OIL $502 MO. $469 HAWAII ^* EXPENDITURES PER PUPIL, 1962-63t • UNDER $300 $300 to $399 $400 to $499 OVER $500 INVESTMENT IN TOMORROW — State-by state spending on public school education last school year is shown on Newsmap. Expenditures ranged from $645 a pupil in New York to $230 in Mississippi. and leaving Sept. 18 to attend officers candidate school at Ft. Benning, Ga. for six months training. Mrs. Aldrich and children will reside in the Frank Rath apartment house during his absence. Mrs. Wayne Hickok spent Thursday and Friday as a representative of Monmouth Presbytery at the pre-seminar preparing leaders for the all Presbytery Conference at Monmouth Sept. 22. The meeting was held at East Bay Camp at Bloomington. Mr. and Mrs. Larry Streeter and family were weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dale Daves at Watseka. Mrs. H. B. Roberts entered the First Dollars The Continental dollars of 1776 were the. first dollars issued in the new United States. They were not authorized and very little is known of their minting. The coins were struck in silver, brass and pewter, probably in Birmingham, England. Cottage Hospital Wednesday for treatment and observation. JOHNS-MANVILLE INSULATION Call WHITE'S - 342-0185 Your Neighbor Says Sixteen of the 43 players on the North Carolina freshman football squad come from outside the state. Distinctive Flowers "styled to say it best" the new ANDERSON MAIN STREET Florist 312 E. Main Street L. E. Steller — Ted Ferris are assured of the finest... when you get TRADE' MAPK Wins Governor's Trophy, 1963 Illinois State Fair One more proof that you can depend on Sealtest for consistent high quality. Why not have some Sealtest award winning products tonight! always get the best. . . get Sealtest

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