The Indian Journal from Eufaula, Oklahoma on July 30, 2009 · 1
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The Indian Journal from Eufaula, Oklahoma · 1

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Eufaula, Oklahoma
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 30, 2009
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1
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The Eufaula B U2TDDD 3 DIGIT 731 THE OKLAHOMA (120409) HISTORICAL SOCIETY 2401 N LAIRD AVE OKLAHOMA CITY. OK 73105-7914 VOLUME 131, ISSUE 31 (USPS 261-620 ) TWO SECTION, 22 PAGES Remembering Baby Jane By Doan Pearce and from staff reports I burled her myself," said Ernie Whlsenhunt, cemetery sexton for eighteen and a half years at Greenlawn in Checotah. "1 was here when they had the funeral for that baby. Over 200 people showed up to pay their respects. Finally, after almost 18 years. Baby Jane Doe has found peace In her eternal sleep. The arrest and charge of 1st degree murder against Baby Jane's mother. Penny Anita Lowry, triggered all kinds of memories for people Involved with the case and for area residents who remember that awful day, November 12, 1991. People have expressed their relief, shock, confusion, and anger for the woman who appeared emotionless In court to hear her charge. McIntosh County Sheriff Joe Hogan was an OSBI Agent working on the case at the time. "She said It wasn't on her mind every day, said McIntosh County Sheriff Joe Hogan, who questioned Lowry after her arrest. At last word, Lowry also had not given up the name of the man with her on that day In 1991 when she gave birth to Baby Jane Doe. An eyewitness, a hunter. said the unidentified man put the baby In a bag and bashed It against some rocks on the shores of Jake Lake near Warner. In the week before charg es were filed, Lowry had been arrested In Tulsa on a material witness search warrant, said Hogan. "We took swabs to match the DNA which first came from the OSBI database so we could confirm she was the baby's mother. Lowry's DNA was In the database because she had been arrested for wire fraud. Hogan remembered Interviewing Lowry, whose last name was Vamell at that time, along with several other young women at a Connors' dorm. He said one girl said she (Lowry) looked pregnant, but had gone away and came back telling everyone she had surgery to lose weight. We had lots of highs and lows. When we got a new due, we'd be excited; but when It didn't turn up anything, we'd be down. "But Bobby never let It go. He kept me fired up. Bobby Is former McIntosh County Sheriff Bobby Gray who served four terms as sheriff before retiring in 2001. "I was really glad to hear they had charged her. I was proud they (OSBI) kept on the case, said Gray. In Indian Journal archives, Gray was quoted numerous times In the months and years that followed Baby Jane Doe's death as fearing people would forget this Innocent child. People called for a couple of years, then only a few would call up until the last ten years when I didn't hear from anyone, Gray said. The case drew national attention and became part of a segment on the television show, "Unsolved Mysteries. - After Its' airing, more leads came In; but. In the 1 " end, they led nowhere. 1 tried everything . I could to solve this case. I even had a psychic come In. She was reluctant She didn't advertise and I dont remember how I even found out about her. She did say the case would eventually be solved. Gray, whose voice broke over the phone, said It was hard to leave the sheriff's office with this unsolved case on the books. "It's the cases you don't solve that bother you the most. It was the worst case I ever had to work on. "Everybody has a right to live. "There was no call for it. An old sorry dog takes care of Its babies. "There are thousands out there who would take any baby any color, even If they had three arms and no legs. Gray repeated how happy he was that Baby Jane was finally going to be able to rest In peace. "We had a lot of help back then. I'm glad Joe Hogan Is here to see It through." The Checotah community rallied to help authorities those many years ago, and they gathered together to bury a little baby girl who See BABY, page 3 I tried everything I could to solve this case, said Bobby Gray, former McIntosh County Sheriff. FMi by SbflMRfl Seventeen-year-old Kara Padgett places flowers on the grave of Baby Jane Doe. Baby Jane would have been 17-years-old now If she hadn't been killed on the shores of Jake Lake in 1991. Una Coppick prepares to cut up the hog cooked for his wife Emily's competition entry for Cop-pick Fanners Insurance In the Whole Hawg Days cook-off last Saturday. EmUy placed third In the conteat. The hog cook-off event started the festival 25 years ago. C-Gawf wins again By Donna Pearce Managing Editor Chris Gawf of C-Gawf Contraction In Eufaula has found the right angle In cooking a hog. For the second year in a row, C-Gawf won the Whole Hawg Days hog cook-off. Cooker for the team was Tim Thierry. Second place honors this year went to Connoisseurs of Fine Swine under the leadership of Danny Artcrberry. Picking up third place in the event was Emily Ccppick dt'Udppicffft"raniia lumutUM u CuLuh. Presenting the awards were Bill Chaney, cooker chairman from the Chamber, and Dian Dawson. The top winners received plaques, trophies, aprons and cash for slaving over a hot cooker. They also got the most Important award of all bragging rights for a year until the next Whole Hawg Days See COOKERS, page 3 Eufaula readies new softball field Improvements are also made to the gym and other facilities. By Tony Downing . Sports Editor It has been anticipated for some time and now It's about to happen. For the first time in school history Eufaula softball teams will be playing on their own field, not on the city fields near the lake. The new $140,000 facility Is located behind the Middle School west of town off Highway 9. "We were able to make this facility nicer than many with less money spent," Eufaula Superintendent Dan Edwards said. The field will be equipped with a wireless scoreboard that win measure 14x5 ft. and was placed Just over the left field fence. "It actually saved us a lot of electrical work of having to ran electricity out to the scoreboard. This way we Just have to have a power source to the scoreboard, Edwards said. On Monday, lights were scheduled to be installed, along with the infield and covering for the covered bleacher area. Ground Lava Rock will be used In the infield Instead of some of the conventional materials. It cost us $1,500 lor the Lava Rock, where we would have to haul the other out of Texas. With this material the kids won't tear them- Fhib by Dswibif Eufaula Schools Superintendent Dan Edwards points out special features of the new softball Helds under construction near the Eufaula Middle BchooL selves up when they slide on it; and it gives so It will lower the chance at getting hurt, said Edwards. Six light poles with 4,500 watts of electricity will light the field. "It will be like daylight out there. Canadian. Valley Electric gave Eufaula a good deal on electric poles, charging $500 each, a savings of about $400 a pole. The dugouts are 15x49 with bath rooms and storage areas In both. "The girls will not have to leave the dugouts to use the bathroom. Eventually, we will add fans and we may add misters at a later date, Edwards said. One of the reasons Edwards was able to build such a nice facility for the cost was because about $60,000 to $80,000 of work was donated by See FIELD, page 3 Local wins poker run Elizabeth Shores of the Lake Eufaula area took home 1st place and $15,000 In the "Boats, Bikers ft Babes Whole Hawg Days Poker Run Iasi Saturday. In feet. die took the font that - tographers didn't get a cnance io gel Lu ftste. Winners, their placing and money earned were as follows: 1st $1 5.000 Elizabeth Shores 2nd--$7,500 Jason Vincent 3rd-$4.000 Ranee Howard 4th--$3,200 Ricky John- jm 5th$ 1 ,250 Tammy Bond Low Hand-$1,000 . James Blalock Mystery ' Card- $f.000 Carrie " Pennington Merchant wln-ner$ 1 ,000 Roseau-ns Sechrlst 5050 ticket ' win-ner-$ 1,255 Debra Rathbun ilMMt Cfcweh v.:., 16-17 Court Report , . ' , Lftffdn Classifieds 15-17 OMtunrian : 16 t. A

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