Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois on September 10, 1963 · Page 1
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Galesburg Register-Mail from Galesburg, Illinois · Page 1

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Tuesday, September 10, 1963
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Home Paper of 70 Communitiei (Jalesburg Register-Mail Weather Stripe Browrt Some Chance of Brief Thundershowers Tdnight, High in 80a Wednesday A Better Newspaper VOLUME LXXII —213 GALESBURG, ILLINOIS — TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1963 PRICE SEVEN CENTS Negro Pupils Enter Alabama Schools After Federalization of National Guard WW Chinese Take Another Slap At Russians TOKYO (AP)—Red China asserted today that Soviet leaders have joined the United States, India and Yugoslavia in a "holy alliance" to strangle revolutionary movements and reinstate capitalism. An article in the Red Chinese theoretical journal * Red Flag said Premier Soviets Oust 'Hooligans' From China MOSCOW (UPI) - Sino-Soviet relations, already strained to the breaking point, took a new turn downward today with Russia's expulsion of more Chinese for trying to smuggle anti-Soviet literature into the country. The Kremlin sent a strong protest note Monday to the Red Chinese Embassy regarding the expulsion, according to the offical news agency Tass. The latest incident occurred Saturday at the Naushld crossing point on the border of Mongolia when officials were inspecting the Peking-Moscow train. Tass said several Chinese "hooligans" had to be expelled. The incident was the latest in a series of differences that have sent relations between Moscow and Peking spiraling downward over political and ideological issues. Tass said several Chinese, including members of the train crew, brawled with Soviet officials Saturday and Sunday after the officials confiscated banned literature. Three Chinese Embassy officials and two other Chinese were expelled from the Soviet Union in June for distributing similar documents. Western diplomatic sources said the Naushki incident made it appear the Peking regime still is trying to goad the Kremlin. They pointed out th.it the incident served to focus attention on border problems once again. Oh. Fiifl «rc5 SHEERNESS, England (UPI)— Tom Fudges and his family paid the full rent and left their home in a housing development five weeks ago on a fruit picking tour through southern England. They returned to find that another family had moved in. "My sideboard was being used as a work bench," said Mrs. Fudges. Khrushchev "has for years been agitating and pulling strings for the new holy alliance." Broadcast by Radio Peking, the article predicted that "the new holy alliance" will be destroyed as were its predecessors. The United States represents imperialism in the alliance, said Peking, Prime Minister Nehru's India represents reaction, and President Tito's Communist Yugoslavia revisionism — violation of Marxist-Leninist principles. Check History "What dirty and despicable deals they are going to make calls for close attention by the people of the world," Peking said. In the latest Peking contribution to the running China-Soviet quarrel, Red Flag took a long look at the holy alliances of the 18th and early 19th centuries and said their "halcyon days" did not last long. "They may storm and rage for a while," Red Flag said, "but they are fated to fail. This is the law of history." The journal said that since World War II, China and a number of other countries have embarked on the road of socialism "bringing into existence the socialist camp of 13 countries, including Cuba." New Alliance Now, it said, a new alliance has appeared as a reaction against revolution. Leaders of the alliance declare its purpose to be sacred and noble, Peking said, and to maintain peace and order, rectify social chaos and build freedom. "Translated into plain language," Red Flag said, "these holy statements should read: to strangle the revolutionary movements of the oppressed people and the liberation movements of the oppressed nations; to preserve the order of imperialist and reactionary domination, and then to reinstate capitalism in the socialist countries." Bride Wades OLDHAM, England (UPI)— Margaret Lambert, 19, Monday married lawyer John Bowyer in a white gown and high black boots . __ D — —because steady rains had filled The town council Monday night I the path to the local chapel with promised an investigation. mud. Parents of Quintuplets Are Pondering Expenses MARACIABO, Venezuela (AP)—With gifts beginning to arrive, the proud parents pondered today how to support five new sons in their one-bedroom home on $10-a-day income. The infants, born almost two months prematurely Saturday, were reported doing well, yawn ing and stretching feebly. They passed their first danger period and are healthy, said Dr. Robinson Suarez Herrera, chief obstetrician at University Hospital. Juan Jose, the third born, had lost weight, less than an ounce. A medical bulletin said all five are in "acceptable condition." Juan Jose weighed 3 pounds, 1.4 ounces at birth. So did the fourth born, Fernando. Use Eye-Droppers Robinson, the first born, weighed 3 pounds 15.5 ounces; Otto, second born, 3 pounds 4.9 ounces; and Mario, fifth born, 4 pounds 3 ounces. A mixture of modified skimmed milk and malt is being fed to the quintuplets with eyedroppers. The mother, Ines Marie Cuervo de Prieto, 34, has left her bed for a short spell on her feet. She and her husband have 15 other children by previous marriages. Three live in their one- bedroom home. "With only one bedroom it's going to be a little crowded," she said, but added, "My husband and I are very proud." The father, Efren, 39, earns 46.70 bolivars—$10.40—a day as a Creole Petroleum Corp. foreman. He helps support 10 children by two previous marriages. Mrs. Cuervo de Prieto, already made a grandmother by a 17-year- old daughter, said she was in labor only two hours with the quintuplets. "It didn't hurt at all," she said. "I didn't have any anesthetic, i trusted in God and in the doctors." Troops Keep Close Watch On Students SAIGON, South Viet Nam (UPI) — Troops and police kept a close watch on student centers today to block any further violent demonstrations by South Vict Nam's youth against the government. Students were under threat of arrest if they failed to attend classes. The regime of President Ngo Dihii Diem indicated it intended to hold for some time the hundreds of students already rounded up in two riots by high school youths protesting the government suppression of Buddhists and other political opponents. Will Be Drafted The government said that those older than 20 arrested during Saturday's demonstration would be drafted into the army. Those under 20 are to be detained in "re-education centers." Most of the 800 arrested Saturday ranged in age from 13 to 18. Scores more high school students were arrested Monday after a wild, fist-swinging, stone- and-furniture throwing riot. Hundreds of youths brawled with more than 1,000 heavily armed troops and police. While observers did not believe the students represented a major threat to the government, they felt the riots were a reflection of the growing popular discontent with the Diem regime. Major Victory While troops in the capital were battling students, other army forces were scoring their biggest single victory in months over the Communist Viet Cong guerrillas. Military sources said government troops killed an estimated 80 Reds and wounded 100 more in a battle Monday near Go Cong, a delta town 30 miles south of Saigon. TOUGH GUY — An Alabama state policeman clenched his fists early this morning as he stood between federal marshals, Don Forrest, left, and Charles Burrows on the capital steps at Montgomery. What the officer had in mind was not explained, hut it occurred at a time when the marshals had been ordered from the grounds by Gov. Wallace. A short time later Wallace was told to stop blocking desegregation by President Kennedy. UN1FAX Nehru Warns Of Pakistan's Flirtations LONDON (UPI) - Pakistan's growing association with Communist China was reported today to be harming British and United States efforts to ease tensions in Asia. Diplomatic sources said Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru has warned British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan that Western efforts to settle the bitter Indo-Pakistani Kashmir dispute are doomed because of Pakistan's attitude toward Red China. The Indian leader was said to have sent Macmillan and President Kennedy similar letters aimed at discouraging attempted mediation between India and Pakistan on Kashmir. Sources said the situation tends to increase tension in the already troubled area and complicate plans to help Nehru against Peking. Britain Keeps Trying But despite disappointment at Nehru's stand, the sources said, Britain will "keep trying" to ease the 16-year-old dispute over the former princely state of Kashmir. Pakistan is a member of two Western defense pacts—the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) and the Central Treaty Organization (CENTO) — and in May, 1954, signed a mutual defense assistance treaty with the United States. But it has registered heavy criticism of British and U.S. military aid to India to help Nehru battle Communist Chinese border attacks. WANTS EDUCATION—One little fellow, Brian Hayes, 5, is the only pupil in the classroom of Mrs. Joanne Burns at Jersey City, N. J. The school normally 99 per cent Negro, is being boycotted on a segregation charge. About 90# students arc staying out of school, but Brian was one of two score attending classes. UNIFAX JFK Says Cut Is Insurance Against Slump WASHINGTON (AP) — President Kennedy described his $11 billion tax reduction proposal today as recession insurance, and said "the prudent man does not tempt fate by unnecessarily delaying his acquisition of insurance." Speaking to the national conference of the Business Committee for Tax Reduction in 1963, a group formed to support the tax cut, Kennedy noted that excluding war years, "this nation has had a recession on the average of every 42 months since the second World War — or every 44 months since the first World War. "By January, it will have been 44 months since the last recession began," he said in his prepared text. Kennedy said he would not predict that a recession will come if there is no tax cut, or even say that it would be impossible to have a recession if a tax cut were enacted. He added: "But I do know that the prompt enactment of this bill, making certain both immediate and prospective tax reductions, will improve business conditions, increase consumer and investment incentives, and make the most of the antirecession thrust that this tax cut can provide." Delay, he said, would "court uncertainty, inadequacy and perhaps total failure." Replying to critics who insist fore taxes are cut, Kennedy noted that estimates of revenues are necessarily only estimates and often wrong. But he added that, assuming the tax bill is enacted, "I expect to be able to submit next January a budget for fiscal 1965 envisioning an estimated deficit below that most recently forecast for fiscal 1964. "And any increase in the federal debt resulting from these transitional budget deficits will be kept proportionately lower than the increase in our gross national product—so that the real burden of the federal debt will be steadily reduced." Urges Third Party JACKSON, Miss. (UPI) - Lt. Gov. Paul Johnson called on the South and the Midwest Monday to join forces and form a conservative party he said could carry the next presidential election. "It is time to unite the Corn- Where to Find It 2 SECTIONS 20 PAGES Abingdon 15 Amusement 5 Bushncll . 5 Classified Ads 18-19 Comics-TV-Radio 16 Editorial 4 Galva 5 Hospital Notes 5 Knoxville 15 Markets 14 Monmouth 12 Obituary 17 Sports 10-11 Weather 2 Women in the News ... 6-7 JFK to Meet Press WASHINGTON (UPI) - President Kennedy will hold a news conference Thursday at 4 p.m., EDT, his first since Aug. 20. The conference will be open to live television and radio coverage. Kennedy Acts to Foil Gov. Wallace BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UP!) — President Kennedy today blocked Gov. George C. Wallace from using Alabama National Guardsmen to enforce racial segregation and Negroes entered white schools for the first time in : three cities. An angry demonstration by white students erupted at one school. | School integration—after more than a week of frantic maneuvers hy Wallace —came to Birmingham, Mobile and Tiiskogec. The outburst of protests from white students came at West End High in Birmingham, one of three schools there which admitted Negroes. Minutes after two Negro girls had entered the building hundreds of white students, mostly mains, streamed outside yelling, "Go i home nigger." Mill About Campus They milled about the campus while city police struggled to control them. The white students swarmed about the campus, jeering and shouting. City police seemed to have the demonstration under control. New groups of students poured out of the building to join the protest on the lawn. President Kennedy jerked the nig from under Wallace about 7:15 a.m. EDT by signing two orders. One directed the governor to "cease and desist" from interfering with the court-ordered integration. The second order federalized the 225 battle-garbed National Guardsmen Wallace had sent into all threo cities to turn away 20 Negroes from five schools. By 10:15 a.m. nine Negroes had appeared at three schools in Birmingham, one in Tuskegee and one in Mobile. Birmingham police kept a firm grip of the situation at West Endfr>.$r and two other schools—Ramsay '' Nigh and Graymont Elementary School where two young Negro brothers started classes in the othW" and 6th grades. Wallace was awakened at his executive mansion in Montgomery ., and told that the President had federalized the National Guardsmen in the three cities. They returned to their armor-'f ies to await instructions after the President's order became known. None of the guardsmen — who were to have replaced Wallace's ¥ highway patrolmen—appeared at the three Birmingham schools. McNamara in Charge <^-<" The federalization order empowers Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara to call into federal service "any and all units of thef<* r Alabama National Guard and Air National Guard" for an indefinite period. This would take from Wallace's control the guard units he had assigned to replace state troopers in preventing Negroes from enter-^. , ing five schools in Birmingham, Tuskegee and Mobile, Ala. Kennedy's executive order also authorized McNamara to "use^ ? such of the armed forces of the ' United States as ho may deem necessary" to carry out the court ordered desegregation. ^pf Kennedy's cease-and-desist proclamation had accused Wallace and other state officials of "wilfully opposing and obstructing" 1 ^^' execution of federal laws and de- % fying federal court orders. British Ambassador Defends Plan to Aid South Rhodesia UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (UPI) transfer possibly would com -British Ambassador Sir Patrick within weeks. Dean went before the Security Council today to defend his government's plan to turn over to Southern Rhodesia's "white minority" government the most powerful air force in Africa. Ambassador Alex Quaison-Saek- ey of Ghana suggested Monday that there was a secret agreement by Portugal and South Africa to maintain the modern, four-squadron air force for potential use against Rhodesia's black African neighbors. Britain, despite U.N. resolutions to the contrary, contends that Southern Rhodesia is a self- governing territory with London retaining responsibility only for its foreign affairs. Parliament has authorized the government to transfer full .sovereignty and control of all its affairs, including the air force and a sizable army, to Southern Rhodesia. Quaison-Sackey said the final Ghana and Morocco, the two African members of the ll-nation council, were preparing a resolution their delegates described as "mild." Its main provision was understood to be a request to Britain to hold up the transfer until a government more representative of Southern Rhodesia's population, which the Africans estimate to be !H per cent Negro, can be formed. Dog Mixed Up KANSAS CITY. Mo. (UPI)—» Robert E. Nigro's small scotty dog apparently was no deterrent to thieves who carted away every* thing from his master's apartment. Nigro returned home Monday, discovered the looting and called police. The scotty bit Patrolman James Keiter when he came to investigate. Survey Indicates 73 Senators to Back Ratification of Nuclear Test Ban Treaty WASHINGTON (AP)— Seventy- three of the Senate's 100 members either are committed to or are inclined now to vote for ratification of the limited nuclear test- ban treaty, an Associated Press survey showed today. But 27 senators either are opposed to approval or have grave reservations about a treaty that would ban all but underground testing. Of this group 12 have either announced their opposition or have voted in committee against belt with the cornpooe," said j the treaty. Fifteen are listed as Johnson, the Democratic nominee; doubtful. that the budget be balanced be- Harnett. for governor to succeed Ross Eight Demos Opposed Those who have announced op­ position include Democratic Sens. Harry F. Byrd of Virginia, Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia. James O. Eastland of Mississippi, Russell B. Long of Louisiana, A. Willis Robertson of Virginia, Richard B. Russell of Georgia, John Stennis of Mississippi and Strom Thurmond of South Carolina. Republicans who oppose ratification include Sens. Wallace F. Bennett of Utah, Carl T. Curtis of Nebraska, Barry Goldwater of Arizona and John G. Tower of Texas. Listed as doubtful are eight Democrats and seven Republicans. They are: Democrats — Sens. Alan Bible and Howard W. Cannon of Nevada, Paul H. Douglas of Illinois, Sam J. Ervin Jr. of North Carolina, Ernest Gruening of Alaska, Henry M. Jackson of Washington, Olin D. Johnston of South Carolina and John MeClellan of Arkansas. Republicans — Sens. Peter H. Dominick of Colorado, Roman L. Hruska of Nebraska, Len B. Jordan of Idaho, Jack Miller of Iowa, James B. Pearson oi' Kansas, Milward L. Simpson of Wyoming and Margaret Chase Smith of Maine. v i

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