Lemont Weekly Observer from Lemont, Illinois on March 23, 1894 · 4
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Lemont Weekly Observer from Lemont, Illinois · 4

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Lemont, Illinois
Issue Date:
Friday, March 23, 1894
Page:
4
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LEMONT OBSERVER SOUVENIR EDITION. Joseph GerhAra. -r.-OBLENZ. GERMANY, one of Lvf the strong fortified cities of that -country, is situated at the junction of the river Mosel with the Rhine, Twenty miles up the Mosel river, in one of the Rhine provinces, is situated the little city of Cochem, and here on the banks of tlu beautiful Mosel under the shadow of au old baronial castle, in one of the most picturesque spots of earth, Mr. Joseph Gerharz was born on June 11th, 1833. The Mosel is a beautiful little stream to whose natural charm is added a wealth of romance dating back to the feudal aes. The legendary lore of the beautiful Hhine provinces would fill many times the space contained in this special edition. It is a country pregnant with the beauties of nature, the refinements of art ana the charms of music. The mountainsides are clothed with vineyards, and In the harvest time the gatherers of the luscious clusters that are converted into the sparkling wines of the Rhine, go, from the time the first streaks of the morning dawn come up out of the east-em horizon to the gentle eventide, sing-ing merrily all the day. The harvest is at hand and the air is laden with grateful song. One of the greatest railroad tunnels in the world enters the mountain at fucheni and makes its exit on the other side, a distance of over three miles away. One at the notable objects of interest at Cochem is the old Cochem Schlosse or castle of Cochem, a beautiful view of which is herewith presented. j Mr. Gerharz. whose father was by profession a contractor and builder and by occupation an attache of the mail de-partment of the German government, lived at Cochem until 19 years of age, when, in 1882, he emigrated to America, and after one year's sojourn at Chicago, located at Lockport, I1L, where he engaged in the business of a contractor for rive years, -after which he came to Lemont an Rial mi hk undertaking Independent Order Mutual Aid. fundamental principle of civil ilL ized government, is co-operation co-operation militates alike to the up-building of municipalities, states and nations, and is the foundation stone on which is built every organization looking toward the welfare, safety and happiness of mankind. Among the many beneficiary organ-, izatlons how being operated for the mutual benefit of their members, not one is a better exemplar of the advantages of intelligent co-operation than the Independent Order of Mutual Aid, of which a strong branch has grown up in Lemont The Independent Order of Mutual Aid is strictly a state beneficiary organization confining its membership to the state of Illinois, though originally it was part of an organization embracing in its operations the territory of the entire United States. In 1878 the mortality among members in the southern states became so great that the order became Involved in debt to the extent of a large sum of money and the affairs of the national organization became almost hopelessly mixed. At this juncture the members of the state of Illinois seceded from the parent order and ef fected a complete re-organization by which a state institution was formed entirely sepaiate from the original organization. Thus was formed the L O. M. A. as it now exists, but owing to the previous condition by which the order had been plunged so deeply into debt, the new order was compelled to assume an indebtedness of something age cost of the first nine years. The order now has over $15,000 in reserve and is in a strong, growing and prosperous condition. The Lemont branch was organized by Deputy Grand Preai-dent, C. W. M. Arnold on April 23, 1884 with twenty charter members as follows: L. Kleinel, John S. Lee, Allison S. Kettering, Nicholas New, Jeremiah C. Murphy, Lemuel L. Brown, John W. McCarthy, Matthew Warner, Ono Earnshaw, Archibald Ingram, Martin Keiley, Nela Christopherson, Thomas Huston, Patrick M. Brackin, Barney V. Drake, A. L. Moody, Matthias Counter, John Rourg, Frederick Sehleinsen and Jacob Helbig. Its first officers were: Pres, T.J. Huston; P. F, Allison 8. Entering; V. 1, Jacob Helbig; H, D, J. C Murphy; F. &, Nicholas New; Tress, P. Brackin; Med. Ex., Dr. A. L. Moody. The membership has grown since that time to sixty-oney and more interest is constantly being exhibited bv people who are able to pass the required radical examination. The fact that the order has stood through all the years of its existence to such a record as it has made, is ever potent in its favor. The present officers of the Lemont lodge are: Pres., Allison Ketter Ing; P. P., P. Brackin; V. P, George B, Parks; B. S., Albert Helbig; F. D. E. Murphy; Treas., Jacob Helbig; Med. Ex, J. J. Leahy. . A man in his prime may know the value of planting an acorn that in old age he may rest secure in the protection of an oak; he never can know what storms may break to sweep away the weaker bulwarks of protection and ' CHUK0HK8. Metbodbt EpUoopal. (The First Methodist Episcopal church of Lemont was established in 1864, the families of Messrs. Norton, Wells, Martin, Clifford and Luther being its founders under the pastoral charge of Reverend B. T. Vincent Since it was organized the church has grown considerably in membership and hi strength and has built on Lemont 'street a very creditable and solid stone church edifice for purposes of worship. Comparatively speaking the membership in Lemont is not large, though the organization Is in a strong, healthy condition and is presided over by Bev. Sensey of Evanston, 111., a recent graduate In theology, an able exponent of the church doctrines, and a man well liked and highly esteemed by the members of his flock. Sunday services are held at 10 JO a. m. and 7 flOp. m, andSunpay-school at 2:00 p. m. The Epworth Ijeague meets at 7:00 p. m. Tuesdays and prayer meeting is held Friday evenings at 7:00 p. m. Polish Roman Catholic. St Cyrillus Methodius church Is located at the corner of Sobieski and Czacki streets. It was founded Aug. 12, 1888, by the Bev. Leopold B. M. Moczygemba. Father Moczygemba also laid out an addition of twenty acres of land which he called Jasnagoria, and which he sold to members of his flock at prices enabling them to acquire homes of their ovn. A large church edifice was built and a school estab- ui tain ' tor and in "nvnb Mair He was marritu - ..J' 1M39 to Miss Ellen Kanni of Lockport Mr. tertian" business isloeated on Main . street and is one of the oldest established business concerns of Lemont From 1852 to "58 he served five years as a member of the volunteer fire department of Chicago, and has served for the past eight ywrs as, and still is, chief ofjthe Lemont volunteer lire, company. He is a man imwt favorably known in a business and social way to almost every resident of Lemont, and a man of whom it is characteristic to be always at the front in movements of. public interest. f 1 r& as B Q 4 : COCHEM SCHLOSSE, RIVER M03EL, GERMANY. Ella Camp M. I). VR. ELLA CAMP located in Le-T; I mont and established an office at the office of Dr. Roberts In December,- 1893. Dr. Camp is a graduate of the Northwestern .University Woman's Medical College. She came to Lemont after a valuable experience as interne to the Chicago Hospital for Women and Children and intends to make this her permanent home. Women are taking more and more to the professions and that they are fully competent to successfully enter the various branches of professional life is fully attested by the fact that Dr. Camp is already building up a successful prac tice in herchoaen profession. The class with which she graduated in 18(10 was com potted of twenty-five women who have since entered on the active duties of professional life in various parts of the country. Dr. Camp's residence is with Mrs. John New Public Library. ("IT'S institution of educational iin lLL portance to the people of Lc A mont and to tlioiic who limy con template coming here is the' Lemont Public Library, it is located at tnc corner of Stephen nnd Illinois streets mid contains many liundre-J volumns of choice standard literature. Rooks nn- free to aUrrs'.'nnoible Applicant. The reading room is free to all rumcin. like 81a,000. And so it came about that the Independent Order of Mutual Aid of Illinois, was instituted under extraordinary difficulties, but if the begin ning was thus difficult, the achievements, growth and Buccess of the order have been none the less extraordinary. It is the only beneficiary order or life assurance organization of any kind operating in Illinois that pays to beneficiaries on the death of the assured the entire amount of all assessments paid in by the assured, in addition to the full face of the policy. Thus, in the case of S. B. Hartz, of Peoria, the records show that Mr. Hartz had paid, during his life as a member of the I. O. M. An assessments amounting in total to 9284:00. At his death his widow received the face of the two thousand dollar policy held by him together with tlie money previously paid as assess- ments,the total amount received by her from the order being 2,284. Among the incredulous who have never taken the trouble to thoroughly investigate the plans by which the liberal policies of the I. O. M. A. are is sued to its members, may sometimes lie heard expressions refuting the possibil ity of perpetuating such a system with out the mortuary assessments being increased beyond any reasonable amount but the fact remains tliat for the pait ten years it lias cost members less than 911.00 per annum, per 91,000 insurance, Apropos of this it may be said that, in leave the oak the only solace of his declining years. It is just so with refer-eneeTft protection for the family. Life is ever an untried sea, fortunes are swept away in an hour, and a thoroughly trustworthy life policy is the only positive protection to the family against the :nawuig won or hunger, snouia tne read winner be suddenly stricken and carried away. A very interesting booklet setting forth the advantages of the L O. M. A. may be had of any member of the order by simple request Get it . Prelichowski's General Store. : . fT is located on Main street and is a monument to the thrift, industry and general ability of Joseph FrelichowskL It is characteristic of Mr. Frelichowski tq be on the hustle ancLto meet with great promptness any reasonable demand of his customers and to this and the exercise of a good mother wit, is due a large "hare of his success. His first experience in the business world was acquired as a clerk in the store of II. 8. Norton, where he remained for a number of years. Later he opened his present store on Main street to which he has been adding stock in the various departments until now he lias a full and completely stocked store of general mercliandise, including groceries, meats, produce, boots, shoes, hats, caiis and dry goods. Coal, wood agreed are also among tnecommod- nanuiea by Mr. f reiicnowski. lias built up a large trade and I'H-iuniiNiraiea ueyoiiu preaavemnre f l... - i : ........ mn .... t it ..A. At...! ..V..... A.l A. surani o ,.w wu... u.r. rr- tl .i ,)e ta a business man calculated to age cost of insurance in mutual organ- weljr a crown woven from the laurels of izations ought never to exceed the avem Hiufess, lished by the Felician Sisters with a pu pilage of 260. The present rector of the parish Is Father Candidus Kozlowski. The membership has grown to 400 families, embracing over 1,000 communi cants, which often, and particularly at Eastertide, when the rites of confirma tion are performed, requires the assistance of one or more of the Jesuit Fathers from Chicago. Since Father Kozlowski came here he has raised an indebtedness of over 96,000, which leaves the church property all clear. It is a good record. The church is in excellent condition. . German Roman Catholic. The church of St Alphonsus was or ganized in I860 and before the end of one year the organization had erected and completed a commodious church edifice at a cost of 94,000. The building has since been improved to the extent of about 93,000. The Rev. Father Rosenbower, of Chi cago, was the first pastor in charge and remained the spiritual adviser or the flock until 1874. The first regular pas tor of the church was Rev. Francis Antly, who succeeded Father Rosen-imwer. and under whose flruidance the church grew and prospered until, when he left the parish, it was one of the largest congregations in the city. Father Moczygemba men presiueu oyer tne church temporarily and it continued to grow under his pastoral charge. Rev. Sixt is the present priest in charge. Keegan A McCarthy. . rjr sure indication ox a city s growth is the location of enterprises in the midst of its people which have not hitherto been introduced In that local- ' ity. It is said that "it Is a poor rule that will not work both ways," and while on the one hand the location of a new business is always an encouraging sign of growth to a city, it is, on the other hand, just as sure an indication of thrifty, well determined, enterprise on the part of the promoters of the business its self. On October 18, 1898 a new business, perfectly in keeping with the import ance of Lemont as a growing city and a business established here because conditions bad grown to be such as to demand it, was opened in the building at the corner of Talcott avenue and Stephen street, by two of Lemont's most Industrious and promising business men. It was none other than the plumbing and steam fitting establishment of Keegan & McCarthy. Of these gentlemen Mr. Michael W. Keegan was born In Lemont October 2. 1868. Ilia education was secured in the Lemont schools. At the age of eighteen years Mr Keegan went to Chicago to learn the plumbers trade. . He remained there seven years and in that time not only mastered the trade but was employed as a finished workman by some of the leading and oldest established plumbing firms of Chicago. His father died while Mr. Keegan was yet a boy of but three years of age. His mother resided in Lemont until three years ago, when she moved to Chicago, where, she now resides. Mr. Keegan is one of the best known of Lemont's boys, honest, Industrious and thrifty, and commands the respect of all who know him. Mr. Maurice C. McCarthy was born in Joliet, April 80, 1868.' He Is a steam fitter by trade, that being his particular specialty, and lias worked in the principal cities of the middle and eastern states. . Mr. McCarthy learned his tradc in Chicago and has been at the business ten years. lie is a young man of good business qualifications 'and thoroughly competent in his line of work. Messrs.. Keegan and McCarthy formed a co-partnership in 1893 for the purpose of establishing a business here,, which they did, as stated, October 16th of that year. Since opening here this firm has secured contracts for some very considerable work which lias either been satisfactorily finished or is in course of completion. The plumbing of the new Lemont village hall was done by Keegan St McCarthy and they now have in process of completion a large plumbing contract which requires the fitting up or tne new Administration Building at Joliet Mr. McCarthy is giving this work .his personal supervision. A number of Lemont residences have also been plumbed by this firm since it began business here. Keegan ft McCarthy handle a full line of sinks, pumps, bath tubs, chandeliers, fixtures and everything usually handled by first class establishments. . They are prepared at all times to fur nish estimates on steam and hot water heating, sewering, steamfltting, plumb ing ana an other work in connection with their business. - Keegan ft McCarthy are young business men, but enterprising and good workers, and are well deserving of the encouragement and patronage of Le mont s business men and citizens generally. Lemont lies in the greatest lime stone quarrying district in the United States. It is in the midst of the richest geological section in the world. tTtHERE are many places of busi-dls neM in Lemont that are not rep. resented in this edition. Some of these places are not of large Importance while others are more pretentious and should have lent their modicum of encouragement and weight to the spirit of enterprise by which the edition was prompted. That these concerns are not represented may, in a few cases, be due to lack of persistence on the part of the Observer but the fact that such an edition was to be issued was generally known and in most cases where there is no representation, it is on account of tlie Inability of those not represented to grasp the real idea of benefit to be derived by just such methods as have been remignized and adopted by wideawake business men in towns and cities all over the country. I,- J

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