Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on September 19, 1955 · Page 14
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Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 14

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Lincoln, Nebraska
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Monday, September 19, 1955
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Page 14
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I^SS—E»ywlng ^rhmokii jttwt» Iwwrtiiit 1 May Be Wron^ By Dick Bicker Jtariil SpOTls Eilttr How far is it from the sidelines to the middle of a football field? 80 feet? 17 steps? Bill Glassford knows. It’s a long, long way when you have just lost a football game and must go out and shake hands with the winning coach. The Biffer has made the trip a lot lately. Down at Norman, Okla., last fall. After the Orange Bowl game and now after the "warmup” with Hawaii. WTiy these trips? What brings about this disintegration of the Husker football machine? At Oklahoma it was a complete blowup folloming a missed fair catch. Rocky, Archie Worrying—About lone By M1;RRAY rose Now they had nothing to do but* . While training drills seldom are his regular fights. The only dif-llng,” said Archie, “I know what ái Glassford At Miami it .seemed to be complete in d i f f e r- ence to the task at hand by some of the players. Ha« a i i? Never have .•tuch overwhelm i n g favor i t e s seemed so shaky and uncertain as did the Cornhuskcrs. Far from being in the position to regulate the game, Nebraska had to play Hawaii's game all afternoon. Simply stated, the young Huskers seemed to lack confidence. They w’ere jittery. There was no leadership. They were, if it is possible at the same time, o\ erconfident. This ambiguous statement needs some clarification. The Huskers were extremely confident going into the game but the minute they got into trouble they were found lacking. They seemed to have no plan. They wouldn’t try a running game. They didn’t react as if they felt they could move the ball, even against this player- shy squad from the Islands. Nor was the confidence sent to them from the bench. Those who sat dejectedly in the stands were quick to spot the anger, the frantic actions of the coaches, includuig Glassford, Di!4org;anizefl Far from using an organized plan which it seems could easily have worn down the 28-man Hawaii squad, Nebraska used a varied attack which was so easy on the Rainbows that three of them were able to play the full 60 minutes in the 93-degree heat. Were there no weaknesses in this Hawaii eleven which now goes Into a schedule again.st small colleges and service teams? Couldn’t those on the bench nr up In the press box on the phones find someplace to strike where there was a chance fw reward? Apparently not. Was there no one to take command of this sinking ship? These are our kids. Whether they were from Nebraska or some outside state, they were Comhuskers on that field. They may has'e been the first Nebraska team In history to hear a partisan home crowd cheer when the foe punched over the winning touchdown, Rcrriiitin^ If these kids can’t do it, then our system of recruiting is bad. A good nucleus of the varsity is hand picked. They are the kid.s Glassford and his staff picked. There has been no handcuffing of the Hu.sker recruiters. They have been given free reign within the regulations of the Big Seven and the NCAA. But we still find ourselves disorganized, losing games which certainly must go down as easy season openers. We can’t continue to stumble. The figures do ncg indicate that things are going to get any better. Last year’s hand - picked freshman .squad of 62 shows just 21 still on the varsity squad after just one year. \^y this waste of manpower and money? If this expensive program can’t return any dividends, then it should be changed. There are no demands for national championships or for a Big Seven crown this year, but losing to Hawaii —that’s too much! Revenge ? This week Nebraska plays Ohio State at Columbus. Outside of Oklahoma, this figures to be the toughest game on the 1955 schedule. If the Huskers think that being named a prohibitive underdog was what put Hawaii over the top, then they will have a perfect chance this week themselves. There most likely won’t be any points given on the game. The odds-makers usually stop at 40 and that won’t be enough for anyone to choose Nebraska. If spirit and desire to win beat Nebraska, then let’s see a little spirit on our side this week. A win over Ohio State, while almost past the wishful thinking stage, would certainly salve a lot of the hurt of the inglorious beginning of the 1955 season. NEW YORK Uh~Hurricane lone, P««*’ «t the *bles and wonder if a reliable criterion, this obaerver, a gal with a real big punch, had ione was going to throw a wet after watching them practice over heavyweight champion Rocky Mar- blanket over their plan*. the past week, picks Marciano to ciano and Archie Moore more If it should blow up Tuesday and win on a knockout within five worried about her than each other force a pestponement, the fight wUl rounds. today as they idled away the be held on Wednesday. Thursday Rocky s body punching has been hours. is the postponement date after devastating and he has been un-1 went Trained to a razor-sharp edge, that, the fighters ended their long pre- Aaxieo* Fighters I paration* for Tuesday’s title bout Naturally, neither wants the de- in Yankee Stadium at 8:.10 p.m. lay. The 38-year-old Ughtheavy- *“* CST short boxing sessions Sunday,! weight fhampion has been wait- typical ing a long time for his shot. He campaigned more than a year for the chance and taunted Rocky almost daily for “ducking him.’* The ancient gladiator considers himself a cinch to become the oldest heavyweight king in history and doesn’t want to wait an hour more than necessary for the crowning. The undefeated Brockton Blaster is ju.st as anxious to get at his cocky challenger. Rocky admits that Archie’s barbs have sunk deep and while he won’t make any prediction, his followers .say that he is burning to destroy Moore in the early round.s. Rocky Spectacular Judging by his last three workouts, the 31-year-old heavyweight ruler may do just that. Never a “gym fighter,’’ Rocky has been spectacular with both the power, speed and precision of his punching. dlferences are that the 16-ouncc' x can do and it’s ju.st a matter gloves and heavy haadguarda nul-l^^ keeping my sharpness.’’ Moore has been in almost con- Ufy his power. Arcble Sharp Moore, asserting that he only i *f*nt training this year. He want* to keep his “edge honed,’*! whipped Nino Valdes In 15 ro^s through easy-paced, two- May 2 and stopped Carl (Bobo) training f«r Moore. It it tha leaal he has sparred for any of his m*. jor fight*. Moore only boxed I0| rounds. Marciano worked on his blockbusting “Suzy Q*’ right in his final two rounds with Sgt. J. B. I^ed Sunday at Groesinger, N.Y. Moor* loading his blow* In combinations| round drills in the past’ week. | Olson in three on June 22. R«ky s bree^d two of three and more within aplit Rocky boxed four rounds in each last fight was his ninth-round rounds, g^^^ ^ ^ ' tory over England’s Don Cockell nlla) Brown and the other with I aession untU the final two days. Marciano’i workouts have been “I’ve been fighting too long to <m_May 16. wars’* he puts on in waste any of my strength in train- Johnny Jenkins, at North Adams, Rocky boxed only 116 rounds In Mass. * The odds still favor Marciano by 3 1 to stretch his all- winning streak to 49 Moore has won his last 21 over the past three year* and nine months. Until Hurricane lone was spawned, the promoting Intern*. PHILADELPHIA iUP> - Ted t,(,nal Boxing Oub had been hop- Kroll, veteran golf pro from Be- ing to do 17.50,000 and better at the thesda, Md,, w’ho finished on the k^te. IBC officials had been count- .hort ,„d Of >our p,a,o,^in ^ St I?.*: n,at.,r of ,w,.tlng out th, *e.th* Kroll Gets His Revenge MARCIANO — all ready Archie takes aim at titleholder Marciano. (UP) Steady Dick Lauer Wins PubKc Links Golf Championship 9 Beating Stefkovich Wichita Gal Wins Mile'High Open of revenge from his playoff triumph in the Philadelphia Daily News Open Golf Tournament Kroll sank a 30-foot putt to win the tournament Sunday on the first hole of a sudden-dealh playoff with PGA champion Doug Ford. They had tied in the 72-hole tournament I at the Cobbs Creek golf course ! with one-over-par 273 scores. Four other times—at Detroit. El Pa.so, Cincinnati, and Cleveland— Kroll had gone into playoffs. Cary , Middlecoff beat him at Detroit and I Cleveland. Lloyd Mangrum at Cin er reports and hoping for the best. With no home television, the advance sale for the closed circuit telecast to 128 theaters in 92 cities lias been phenomenal. Theater Network Telecast, Inc., officials expect to gross one militon dollars at an average of fl.SO a head. From this the IBC will collect about 1300,000. Radio will throw another 135.000 into the pot. From the IBC's share. Marciano will collect 40 per cent and Moore 3S) per cent. With a break in the weather. cinnali ..rf Chandler H.rper at El 000 and Moore 1200,000, Dick Lauer won the Lincoln Pub- paced by George Albin, who topped ; r.iewn lie Links Golf Championship Sun- iday with steady play during his 36-hole match with Joe Stefkovich. i Lauer gained the crown on the !33rd hole, leading 4-3. The two finalists were all even after the morning round with 78s, but Lauer's string of pars in the afternoon rattled Stefkovich and he faltered on the back nine. FLIGHT WINNEim l.*tt Flight! Bob Stroh over Harvey Kaufman. .'»•2. 2nd Flijtht: Leroy Rothe over J, Schall. 2 - 1 . .Ird Flight; Harold Bettis over Nick Onofrio. .'»-4. 4th Flight; Jack Andrewt over Bill .Shainholtr.. 2-1. 5lh Fliaht: T, K. Dance over Bruce Jon«»s. 4 - 2 . 6th FliiCht: Carl Finley over Don Betts. 1 - 0 . 7th Flight: Jim Murphy over Mark Mercier, 2-0. flth Flight- Bob Knape o\er Larry Osterman. 4-3. Phil Southwick scored the second hole-in-one of the summer at Lincoln Country Club when he > aced the 148-yard 14th hole with a five Iron. At Park Valley, golfers were led by Glen Stover’s 33, Harold Heath’s 36 and the 39 carded by John Willock. Linksters competing in the Hillcrest Grand Sweepstakes were Her* Wiiicv. Bud round of par golf into the cham- DETROIT if*~Bill Stits, Detroit Lions halfback from UCLA, works Hollywood Pa.so. He started the final rmind four ' DENVER i/p — Marilynn Smith strokes off the pace of Ford and HapK StiinfLltl of Wichita, Kan., turned a final Bud Holscher. the Apple Valley. Calif., young.ster who eventually finished in a tie for fifth, the field of 72 with a net score j siV^V Kd smith"'" ' ~ - piousmp ™ too »o.tmu wue nign Doug Higgin.s of Midland, Tex , as a movie extra in of 65. ) 7^: t'.iiign. J w. Riricy. p«ui Women’s Open Tournament here overcoming a four-over-par fourth during the off-season. Stem. Hurt Ehrmann. Emil Frank, Frcman uiu u . The 54-hoIe, season* ending I Everrctt. Dr. u. i*. Marotni. Hurt Evan, i Sunday. hole when he went into a creek sweepstakes will be completed' next Saturday and Sunday. j •f,™ iv.Vri,' k ™ M.i to finish the 54-hoie tournament .. . , . , , —, First Round results: s.,r«.n. . mty S^nt ?o Hol.scher, a four- Tommy Bolt of Chattanooga and I Paul O’Learn of Bismarck, N D «.'! A thin, «7: Hollit Bailey. H<t: Dr. Fred D*»cy. Gene Chadwell. Rod Wnbcl Ö»; .lohn Herrod. Paul White. Hal Bowm. Whitcy Reed Earl MaCoy, Don Scbocn. Toby Jovtcu. 70; Dick Spomcr, Sit North, Gerald rhnstofferson. Bob Jone». Cl'de Cessna, Bob [..andcgren. Rod Diidlev, Joe Johnson. Walt Madden. Don Albin. 71: lack McCunrtion, Ted BrrytaciV Time Out Brennen. Bill Sheehy, Gene Murray, Ray "tcckcr. Bill .Irnntnfs “.'t: Tom Harns. Ken T/igan. Mai Groaahans. Atlcc Stephan, BUI Gif anti. , » . .)ale Wiibev. Hernie Anderson, INrcy OVCr thC 6,324-yard : Country Club course with t«: Dob Pawell. Harold Nootr. Flovd ___ ««, Meehan, ®'rank Goety Bob Teasdale. Jrthri UndCr-par 221. piovk*^**'’ Koser. Don Kievit. Erv ^ Bctsy Rawis of Spartanburg, 70 : Carl Hiidmn IM); t'ietn Agullef. Earl Vermaaa. SI: I/corard D.itev. A2: H E. Sweeburg. H4: Ham StH-nty »5 Dick Cubbison Women’s Open Tournament here Sunday. hole when he went into Miss Smith. 26, shot a par 75 couldn’t come out. and Marty finish the M-hoie tournament Split Schedule Faces Schools . A split schedule faces the Lin-; nee City meets Lincoln Cathedral coin schools this week, two of them af fhe Wesleyan Stadium. Lincoln High came from behind Friday night to defeat a hard- playing on Friday night and two on Saturday. After splitting the wins and losses last week all fmir take on top- rated foes this week. Sioux City Central comes Into Lincoln-land to test the mettle of the Links Friday night, and Northeast travels to Fremont the same night to try the Tigers. On Saturday Beatrice plays South Games This Week ^ ^ frid .% y SI««« Cky CfRlraJ . «t IVortlicgM S.ITl'RD.AY Liacobi Hick eg Frcmnci Rralrk-v I’gwae« City ■I SottlhecM M 4*«thednil MT.A.MUXtis --------- r—............ ,, . I’erc. Puintb Opp. east in the Oval and new foe Paw- XimsegM Í:¡ à'ÎJÎ H ( atlirilrdi .................. |.i .5,10 *45 '14 Football STATE HIGH SC'HOGlJI SuNlbrtut 0-2 .UWI 3» OthkoUi 7 ..................... iatncrial • Oauli» Honth S.% . . OaMha ('entral 8 DnMh» se . roMcil niHffa AL • Bon Town *8 .. Loen* (Dabaqoe. la.) fl AwlMrW IS ......... .................. Eha Traek « AraoalM» tS ... ......................CnitoertMNi 0 .krcttlin 31 ......... ............................. Mema 0 ' Bmàjr 4*........... ...................... KdiaoR « ' BloniMMd 1* .. .................... HartiMHra « ' BrMlàtow ÎH ....................... Homnkrcv « j ranmlwN S« ... ........................... U lko« 8 t «MbrlSKe 25 ... ......................... Trentoa 12 ' 4'keuer 38 ......... .................. Remold» 7 ('reUelKnn 20 ..., ......................... Tlldea 0 ItoWHt *8 ......... .................. LewMon 14 Klkhorn 2« ......... ........................... Gretna 19 Kxrter 3» ............................ Attell 14 ! Fríen* 8 ............. ..................Gahic Rock 0 > Fille» .14 Fairfield 21 ... Klwood 32 .... GruH .13 Holbeook 1* ... ........................... Bartley 12 | Minden 31 ......... .................... Ganeva! 8 i Dwrola 13 , . . Fender 2« ..... ...................... \l’i»ner 6 RoMilie .58 .... ...................... Beemer 7 R ms H u .17 ......... I4an»nt 38 .... K»racM»e 27 . . . Hlamford 19 ... ........................... Korti» 8 U'»»»« 31 ......... .................... Madikon 7 IVimore 40 ... ....................... Humholdf 0 f 'olertdtw 2« ,, . f'nlonih«» 20 < orltand 25___ ..................Tahle Koeh 11. ( iiadrwn 2o iimdutm 12 ..... I lr»ac» 0 Martincfon llolv TrInH» 1» Si«>«K CKl' Central R Miuad 0 Nentncfnrd 39 ..............t'hadrofi Freeo e Hvadnit ÎS ........................ Harrison 6 M»ad«iw Gro»« 3 S.................. Bronkwirk o : Mnllen 41 MaxwMl 24 .................... Farman 20 ; Newnuifi Gro»« 1 ........... Battle Creek o : Orchard 54 ___ ...................... Cleamater 12 Fierce 11 ___ .......... laniiei 0 < Kl. Paal 19 ................Silver Creek 0 ' Falla ( H i Kacvtid HeaH 12 I Samaer 28 DaKoa 14 ___ -----Mttckeil Honflower 12 Trwdnwll 50 ... ........................... Shlekley « Waaaa 32 ........................Kandoink 7 WeW Keameir Si ...........................Shelton 0 , Slaataa 56 ............................ Nelixh 8 PRO EXHIBITIONS I>ete»a 27 BaltUnor» 44 playing North Platte squad, 19-7, after having a little trouble getting going in the first half. Northeast absorbed a drubbing at the hands of a smooth Grand Island team, 33-0, and was kept in the game all toe way by toe charging fullback Gene Dlttenber and the passing arm of Bob Els. The other Capital City winning Atlantan Wins Stock Car Race LANGHORNE, Pa. (J’S - Tim Flock of Atlanta led from the 80th mile Sunday to win the 250-mile National Circuit Championship late model stock car race, establishing a record speed average oi 77.88 miles an hour. Flock drove his 1955 Chrysler over Langhorne Speedway in an official time of 3:12.35, a one-mile dirt track record for the distance. Herb Thomas of Sanford, N. C.. winner of the Southern .500 mile stock car race finished second, one lap behind Flock. Thomas set the old record of 3:30.42.89 last year. One accident marred the event. Axel Anderson’s car blew a tire and flipped upside down on the fourth turn, sending him to Lower Bucks CkKinty Hospital with face cuts and suffering from shock. Anderson is from Patchogue, Long Island. Twenty-four cars finished out erf 45 starters. Marvin Panch of Oakland, Calif., Fenton Repeat» A» Archery Champ OMAHA — Lee Fenton of Nebraska City Sunday repeated as men's champion in the field archery tourney held here by the Prairie Bowmen. John Madison of Omaha was second and Don Hintz, Lincoln, third. Other winners: Womvn’s divUiion—Won l»r Nancy Marxhall. Omaha: 2 —B«Uy Fenton. Nebraaka City; 3—Grace Cotton, Lincoln. Junior boy»—Won by Mark Etienburg. Colutnbuii: 2—Ronald Brioo, Nellxh; J- Tom Saunders. Columbus. Junior girls—Won by Mary Kerme Henry. Nebraska Cltyj J—Joyco Pma. Nebraska City. S. C., third Saturday, finished with * Blasilipamc RookiC AA a 7t and second place with a 222; ST. LOUIS — Don Blassin- total. game, 23. the youngster whom Beverly Hanson of Cincinnati, tiepased Manager Eddie Stanky ana Joyce Ziske of Waterford, Wis., planned to use at shortstop for tied for third, wach with a 224. the 19.56 St, Louis Cardinals, has Patty Berg, pre-tourney favorite been chosen the rookie of the year and first-round leader, finished in the American As-sn. He starred fifth with 228. at second base for Omaha, T^Êm «Ai» SEAT COVERS *29“ AB MÊÈtm ani Maiali 4 StÊHêfmciUm Gmmm FRED M. »DIES MOTOkS MC im A O H B-IMI **Well, of all the craxy placet te have a clubhouse window!’* She Likes Golf RICHMOND, Va. tn — Miss Freda Pattison, who played in the 1923 Virginia women’s amateur golf tournament,plays the game two or three times a week regardles* <rf the weather at the Hermitage course. A native <rf New Zealand she has managed a bank cafeteria the last 12 years. surprisingly weak Grand Is- jeer’s brother, was fourth; and land St. Mary’s, blasting the Rams i Tim Massey of Burlington, N. C., 39-0 behind the superb running of fifth. Clancy Woolman and some fancy- stepping teammates. And Southeast was topped by Good Training DURHAM, N.C. im-Duke Uni- fired-up Hastings, 20-0, when the | versity halfback Bob Pascal has second case of fumblitis hit the j had good training. His father was new team. 1 his high school coach. a a avDsoN «WUil NOW . . . 3 out of 4 Con Be 2-Car Families And SAVE up to • • • »1000®® 0WL Spsdat. 2-car family discount savings program ha* a plan especially tailored for you. Remember TK beu I prices start as low as ... . *1663’® SHIvrrfXl la Llaeela BURKE-SCHNEIDER 1724 "0"Your NASH Daokr2-2702 ben Simon's ¿cononui ßoAement Johnson & Murphy Shoe Sale SAVE ONE HALF ond MORE! Quality shoe« at saving« you can not afford to miss • • • these are all popular styles, but in broken lots and sizes . • • browns and blacks . • ^ loafers and slipH>n styles. « Simon's Economy Basement Let Three Successful Men tell you about the DALE CARNEGIE COURSE ^ Frank Bttlger ^ ^ LowtU Thomat ^ ^ yituent SmUimM'] r' mmd mmlkmr •/ «4» SMt UUmf •*Bmm I ErtW Uywlf fmm f allmrm to Sac««.« la Tkiu /aatoa« k0mk kmt «aW tmmtm mmgim Ikmm mrny mthmr TC.V ktmk» an “It would he ahnoet tnqxMigble ne to exagcerat« how iinp(»rtant the traintng 1 got in Mr. Camegie’a Coureo haa been to me. It gave noe eelf-confidonce; it gave me courage; it broadetwd my viaion, stimulated my enihuaiaam and helped me ex- preee my ideas more effectively to other men. It helped me destroy the birgeet enemy I ever bad to ftice—fear!” Mmdim mmd Mm rmtmmmmtalmr, mmtkmr, •mpimrm mmd Cwtoiwata Prmdmrtr. A6»/j|y To Sprak h A Short Cut To Dudinttion. Date Carnegie “»• developed a ayitem of training I hat la unique—a striking combination of public speaking, personal development and applied peychobgy —one of the moet significant movements in adult education. I aiwava regretted that I never had the op- Fmr «tM>r thtrty \mmr% tmm mtmrmurm mmd rnmtkmr mf mdmy'ê it *«.» ••Umt -ff.w to 5MI Ymmf Wmy tmtm ‘Taking the Dale Carnegie C larked a mileetone ta my career hi^uae it concentrât«« on baiidinf aelf-confidenoe.—Time and aaatn I have aeen graduâtes of this S!Lus Course get ahead faatiw. I heartily regrettw that 1 never had the op- recommend Carnegie training as • S ^rtunity to take the Dale Carnegie ‘wuat’ for evervone who w<mm rim ourae which la world-famous.” above the crowd.” PLAN NOW TO ATTEND FREE DEMONSTRATION MEETING Tues., Sept. 20# 7:30 P. M. Hotel Cornhusker Over 450,000 men and women retommend this training^ T HB biggeet booeters of the Dale Some of the country’s leading Can^ie Course are its grad- corporations use Dale Carnegie uates. Tlirough it they have Training to help their employees found a new world of auccesa and advant» to more importont posi- cial and personal gains. Sheaffer Pen, Sun Oil, New York The Dale Carnegie Course is Telephone Co., Jersey Central time-tested and proved ... built Power, Johnson & Johnson and on 43 years succemiful exi>erien(» many others believe in this train- and given in 750 cition in the ing it must be good! United States. 1A WAYS 7NIS WOtlMAIUNIt lUcCHIRSE Will HUP YOB... ^ SwUHwHf • Imreaie Yasr law* • "Sdl“YaHrsaH«ilY*HrMa«s • laprav* Yasr AUHy Is • lacrassa Yssr AMUly Is Dad wHh Paapla • WialllaraFfMi • hspravt Yssr PtnamHly e Ptipsrr Fsr lasAanhIp M« Ym first Sitp ftrwmi MOWI COME-SEE A CLASS IN ACTION SAllCAINiail fkm mmm mkm kmttmmmê im voll, dsuhmr Tm Wim Frimmdê mmd tmßsmmt» Cmmptm** mmd **Bmw Tm Slmg Wmrryimg msul Stmrt Dais Carnegis daaase are amall and friendly. The atmoaphere la mutually helpful and encouraging. You will make Acquaint- anoea who, like yourself, are anxious to get equipped for a more aucoeaaful life. J2ofi*f lei anything stop you from lutming. It may bo tho most tm- portant dmision of your Ufot DALE CARMEGIE COURSES rvMmt«« to vmmstm iy D«wM A. DaUawg uat leoOi Mill St. . Omaha WA ll3t THE CAPITAL CITY KIWANIS CLUB ProuMy spomoro TlwDAUCARNE6IIC0UR$l mué rordtsUy Invite» r«« to «tt»«* IB« TIESO AY. S«pt. 3*. t;a* r.ii. Hotel Cornkmker AbaolMtely no obUgnUoii For further tnformntion rnU U m fMlowlns HMoaben 4ehn MoOmuMi t-SSM M S«an4»r» .....„..^-«wa te RftTSl.à .............tîîS

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