Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on November 27, 1931 · Page 12
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Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · Page 12

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Friday, November 27, 1931
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Pittsburgh Buries Huskers Under Touchdown Avalanche^ 40 To 0 A mid all this wringing of hands and casting of soulful eyes heavenward, let the old para- phraaer get in a word, here, boya. Football, the old boy contends, like life, is just a bowi of cherries. Don’t take it serious. It’s too mysterious. Example ? Run the pages back to 1929 and take the case of the Pittsburgh Panthers themselves. After sailing thru an undefeated season, the Panthers were chosen for the Rose Bowi game against Southern California. Pitt that year had some All Americans in Donchess, Parkinson, Tully, Montgomery, along with Eddie Baker at quarter, Uansa, Williams, Dimeolo and others. 'These lads travelled to Pasadena and were blistered with a Trojan passing attack which finally ended 47 to 14 for the U. S. C. team. If this be balm, make the most of It. lliRS US PANlfiS m PSIÜEO TiMP THEY’RE BIG GUNS IN FAST MUSTANG ELEVEN Worst Defeat Grid History- in Husker “Line Is Badly Riddled. SEBASTION STANDS OUT BLACK THURSDAY. The defeat Thursday, 40 to 0, wa.s the worst drubbing a Ne- raska team has taken in the for- y-one years which Nebraska has played football. Ten other low- lights of the Husker record over the years: a JfWfll ........................ *4-0 buM—lit«« ............... !M-e IS»»—lows MUU .....................................SS-O ISOI-^MInn^MitA ............. is-e !»»»—MH-hlKM .................. .*!-* 1005—Mlnnrcot».............. SS-4 IWM—('Slug« ..................................................3S-6 IS01 —m. liiMito .......................... s4-e ISO*—r»rU»l«i IndlMi« .............................av-s lOie—..............................................*T-e ISIS—N'otrc IlknM ............... IS-0 l»n>-.MIrhtgMi...........................................**-• lets—illlnni« ...................................................*4-1 1914—Netr« Dgma ............. S4-S By a Staff Correspondent. PITTSBURGH.—T he use of Panthers as a co^omen for Dr. Sutherland’s ferocious Pittsburgh footballers takes a rating as 100 percent perfect from the standpoint of accuracy. A Panther team celebrated Thanksgiving day at the Pitt stadium by sweeping over the Nebraska Comhuskers to a 40-0 triumph, piling up six touchdowns j and four extra points by dint of an irresi.stlble driving and passing attack which for sheer power and all around brilliance quite surpassed the achievements of any gridiron aggregation a Comhus- ker outfit had inspected since the sma.shing defeat Notre Dame’s “Four Horsemen’’ outfit administered to Nebraska’s scarlet jer- seyed gridders back in 1924. Before the proceedings were five minutes old, the Panthers had swept around and over the Bible- men to their first touchdown. The Sutherland team’s scoring achievement, crow’ning a parade of eighty- ACfi sm ncKS NOBMsra ™ TO MEASÜRE PORDOE Gophers Favored in Third Meeting in History With Ohio State. Conieir» Reverse Run Deceptive NOTRE DAME OVER ARMY MTAGG'S sr.iJcrTioNs. YVINNKR IXISKR MlnnriMita Ohio sute Northwestern Purdue Michigan YY'l*con*ln Notre Dom« .Army BY Ca.p^. Ai-FRED HOWARD SPRAOUE ^ _ ' ^ .MARION MAMMON Astooiated Prea$ Photo Southern Methodist university’s troupe of aerial Mustanga ara cutting their old capers again thia season, and they’re still among the undefeated and untied teams. Shown above are members «f the 1931 model of the tricky crew; Gilbert, quarterback and passer; Sprague, 198-pound back; Capt. Neeley, guard, and Marion Hammon, tackle. five ’yard*, with Halfback Heller ing the Northwestern-Pvirdue char- BEATS Personal nominaton for the most unusual happening In the sports world recently: The feat of Earl Lahertew, Iowa State two-miler, who ran the last mile and a half of the race here against the Comhuskers, with a broken ankle. Labertew, of course, lugging the ball on the final plunge. HeMer Scores Again. Pitt’s second touchdow’n punctuated the first minutes of the second period, with Heller carrying the oval on the scoring play. Heller, a three year veteran in the Pitt lineup, made the Com- husker cau.se more di.«mal than ever when he charged to two additional touchdowns during the didn’t know that he had “.sheered” ' third period. Then a new Panther H gear altho he said there was intense pain in his ankle. He kept on plugging and finished tenth m a field of twelve. Those other two lads, beaten by a guy with a broken leg, likely will never live it down. ANOTHER 5 YEAR PLAN. The five year contract given Coach Bible has aroused comment in other Big Six centers. Bus Ham, in the Daily Oklahoman, calls it a vote of confidence. He writes: VOTE or CONriDESirE! N’*4iraiik« anlvrraltr Ha« stvra Dana X. Hlblr a five-yrar mntrart and takrn an option on Ua «crvk-^ for another flvr- yrar p^alnd. ft 1« doiibtfsl If an* «rhool In tho ooon- try plaooa a hiakor prrmiani on football -lSo*erlee than Nrbraaka and Iho oxtrnalon of RIbIr’« eontrart ovor «ark a period 1« a remarkablo dlsfda* of ronfldonro In tkl« bald, mellow, rot and mon from Texa«. HIblo la enqaettttonably ono of the •marte«t football men In theoe part«, ha« a «plendid perronallty and «hotild give Nebra«ka b«lt«g and better team« aa he «tay« OB. Evan Eldw'ards In the Lawrence Journal World: .Nebraaka ha« taken atep« to laanro atrong football eleven« In the t'omhHake.r ramp by retraining Dana X. Bible aa head roaeh under a five yeay rontraet and with on opIloB oa the next five yearo of hla •ervleeo. nibie, who went to Nebraaka from Texas A. f: M., is nnder a ihreo year con­ trae« at the Idaeoln aehool and It expires Jan. 1. In hla threo yeara at the f'oriihuaker In- »tltntlun Bible'« leanis have won the Big Six football chomplonahlp twice. In 192H and 1991. He Is recognised as an onlatanding coach and It populor with the Nebraska athletes. Most of hla aaslstant ceaclie« aro farmer Husker gridsier«. ( oach Bible, despite some eritleiam from .Nebraska adherents, has steered the big rt'd trams away from too mneh poaerhouse football and the Huskers employ a varied attack tnclndbig end runs, laterals and other open format Ions. Kansas athletic authorities might do well give some thought to the Nebraska to nrhenie. At K. I', the head coach of fnot- b.ill and hts assistants are hired on a >early basis: KItlier the coach resigns, la tired or lo notified he Is retained by Jan. 1 of each year. Why not lengthen the tenure of the K. V. Kildlron tutoroT Such a step would permit the eoaeh to Drmly establish his system and to go obont the buslneoo of hulldlng a football team with the kiiowiedgo that he tould lay a strong foundation. It Kansas hired a roarh for five years, or threo yearo, say, the so-called “wolve«” would be quieted and probably devote their efforts to another line of endeavor, possibly to supporting the team. The life of a coach lo rocky to tay the least and It he la good enough to be retained by a nnlverslty he shonid be entitled lo a eontrxet for more than one year. When a coach Is hired for a year he Is upt to feel tliat he must do or die. It Is iMisslble for him to figure that he must build a winner at all costs, and no doabt In some instances football talent Is prose- Ijled or snbsidlird and Ih* roach rushes lieli niell into I be Job of throw ing together an eleven I hot ran win some games, without due regard for syst«-ni or tradition and other such faeiort. There was a feeling that was general among Husker followers before the Pitt debacle: AH would have laid their shirt on the line that there wasn’t a team in the country capable of beating the Nebraska eleven forty points. Several teams unquestionably a touchdown or two better but no more than that, and it would have taken a game to prove even that much. (^uick, Watson, the sackcloth ana a couple of barrels of ashes and you might dust off the favorite grovelling place. Marquette ^ ins. DES MOINES. tUP). .After trailing 6 to 0 at the half. Marquette university scored five touchdowns In the last two quarters and defeated Drake university 32 to 6 in a Thanksglv.ng day football game. Pro Football. Chleagn Bears 19, Chicago CarrdFaalt T. e'optctoB 9. New Y orti Giani« «. scoring 'Btar, Halfback Sebastian, substituting for Reider, flashed his way across the screen. Sebastian, even bulkier and speedier than the spectacular Heller. twice planted the pigskin back of the Nebraska goal line, after a ball advancing performance which speaks volumes for the future of football at Pitt. Sebastian a Sophomore. The Huskers have seen their la.st of Heller, who Thursday rounded out his varsity career in Panther n:\ole.skins, but Sebastian Is a sophomore and Nebraska followers many properly look forward to an inspection of a halfback of dazzling efficiency when young Sebastian comes to Lincoln next fall for the 1931 renewal of the Panther- Cornhusker series. The power and puissance of Pitt’s offensive may be best appreciated from a study of the game statistics, which disclose that the Huskers were hopelessly outclassed from the opening kickoff to the final pistol shot. The Panthers ran the ends, smashed away •successfully at the line and completed forward passes with the skill and precision of a perfect football machine. A wall of interference provided a shield for the ball carriers on virtually every thrust aimed at the Nebraska wings, while the drives at the line were cleverly camouflaged by a series of fake sorties toward the ends, after which the ball carrier crashed straight ahead and frequently plunged beyond the Nebraska secondary before the Panther runner could be flopped to the turf. Pitt Gains 583 Yards. Pitt’s total yardage of 583 from scrimmage, as compared with less than 200 for Nebra.ska, and long margin in first downs, represented by twenty-two for the Panthers, as against a meager two for Nebraska. disposes of every doubt concerning the merits of the Pitt team’s smashing victory. The lone Nebraska gesture toward a touchdown, which, if scored, would have averted the humiliation of a shutout, punctuated the second period. Taking possession of the ball on downs back on their 14-yard line, the Huskers’ forward passing attack suddenly gave evidences of attaining potency, with Fullback Sauer faking a punt, a Sauer to Bauer pass netted fourteen yards. Quarterback Bauer followed on two spinner plays on which he plunged to another flfst down. Husker« to 9-Yard Line. With Sauer and Bauer alternating In flipping the oval, first to Kreizinger and then to Masterson, the Cornhuskers inaugurated a steady march of eighty-one yards to within the shadow of the Pitt goal. The Panthers retreated stubbornly. But the Sutherland eleven was forced back to its 9-yard line, when Tormey, Pitt’s substitute center, intercepted a Sauer pass at the goal line and quickly sped down the field to a point beyond the danger zone. Coach Bible, before the Corn­ huskers pulled away early Thursday night from the scene of their overthrow, declined to make excuses for the Nebraska Waterloo. “We were up against a foe of unusual power and general excellence,” the Nebraska coach said. “Dr. Sutherland assured me that the Panthers were at their peak, playing their best game of the season. After seeing the Panthers in action today, I can appreciate their success in running up four touchdowns against the Army. “Dr. Sutherland also told me that his squad had enjoyed nearly two weeks of rest in preparing for their fine performanc«, whereas Nebraska was keyed up for its fight of last Saturday with Iowa State and the reaction plus the long trip from Lincoln, possibly factored in our disappointing showring,” Coach Bible continued. “We shall have a full week to get ready for our charity game in Denver and the Huskers may be clicking again when the time rolls around to pull away for the west," he said. The Nebraska party, after view- ity game in Chicago Saturday afternoon. is due to return to Lincoln i Sunday morning, via the Burling-, ton’s Ak-Sar-Ben: N>hr«ika— —Pittsburgh. burkes ..................1* ................ Hlrshberg Rhra .......................It Qustse lustlce .....................Ig Milligan Kly ..............................c Daugherty O'Brien ...................rg .............. H Morris lllbert .....................rt............. MncMurdo Pet* ..........................ra Collins Brown .....................qb Cutrl Masterson ...............Ih Heller Krelxinger ...............rh Reider Hauer ...............lb Clark Scors by periods: Nebrasaa ............................. 0 0 0 0— 0 i’lttsDurgh ......................... 9 7 14 13—40 Substitutions: Nebraska—Kllboume for Durkee, McPherson for Gilbert, Bauer for Brown, Joy for Pet;i, Schmitt for Rhea, Hulbert for Schmitt, Miller for Bauer, Paul for Masterson, Manley for Bauer, O'Brien for Hulbert, Adam for Kostsr, Penney for Krelsinger, Campbell for Ely. Bishop for Adam. Pitt Tormey for Daugherty, Sebastian tor Reider, Datley for Hirshberg, Meredith for Quatse, Onder for Morris, Luch for Clark, Hogan for Cutrl, Love for MacMurdo, Mateslc for Sebastian. Brown for Heller, Summs for Brown, Yentch for Onder. Anderson for Merdith, Tlmmlni for Dailey CREIGHTON PREP Long Pax» Give» Blue and White 6-0 U in—First Victory of Season, Cathedral high upset Creighton Prep 6 to 0 Thanksgiving day during a snow storm on the Lincoln high oval. A pass, John Beilharz to Harold Conroy, was good for thirty-one yards and touchdown in the first quarter. Dick Roach’s attempted placeklck for the extra point failed. Dick Roach’s punting kept the junior Bluejays on the defensive most of the time. Three of his boots stopped on the Creighton Prep 10-yard line and another rolled to the 4-yard line. Coach Eddie Hickey’A^iroteges managed to punt out of danger each time, however. Pitt scoring- Touchdowns-Hciicr 4. Ss-1 and 'White eleven bastian (subbing for Reider) 2. Point after Came thru In great style and had touchdown: MaiMurdo 4 (^acements). 1 ball in Creighton Prep terOfficials: Referee, Ed Thorpe, Do La or ST. lOSE LBftTTLETOIl SCOEESS DEIlDLIlli Missourians Stop Pair Capital City Scoring Threats. of WILLIAMS, KULPER STAR Salle; umpire, A. W. Palmer, Colby headllnesman, T. J. ifcCabe, Holy Cross; field Judge, E. E. Miller, Penn State. ÏORK OÖTNE NOSES EHM 3- ritory most of the game. Dick Roach and John Beilharz were outstanding in the winners' backfield while Conroy, Mercier and McCullough looked good on the line. Sesto and Brick played well for the Omahons. The starting lineups: Cathedral— Mercier Henry ......... Eenton .... Molona .... Lehr ............ McCullough Conroy ........ Bourka ........ QuattrocchI D. Roach Beilharz Score by Cathedral . ... Creighton Prep Substitutions; Conroy, Conroy —Creighton Prep ................. Brick ............... Barter ................. Winn ................ Aboud ............ R. Vana ........... Donovan ................ Duyer ........... Moriarlty Ih O'Hanlon .... O. Vana ............... Sesto Mersey Placekicks Goal That Beats Bulldogs—Antelopes Finish Third Place. YORK.—York college won from Cotner 3-0 on a snow covered field Thursday, finishing ahead of the Bulldogs for third place in confer-: Duyer7Quinn forAboud.'wiison for"d'Han - • - Ion, Daly for G. Vana, Wlnahlp for F'. 'V>na. Pratt for Moriarlty, O’Hanlon for Wlson, Moriarlty for Pratt, Pirlncello for Sesto, Muffett for Quinn, R. Vana for Daly. Officials; Max Roper, Nebraska, referee; William Knight. Nebraska, umpire,; Don Hale. Nebraska, headllnesman; Felber Maaadam, Nebraska, field Judge. rh fb ............. quarters: « 0 Cathedral B. for D. Roach 0 0 0—9 0 0 0—d Roach for B. Roach for Mercier. Creighton Prep—Regan for ence standing. Adams’ end runs and Hewitt’s line plunging featured York’s attack. Hersey place kicked the field goal and with Skinner and Hoffman looked best on defense. Gardner and Epler were strong in the Cotner line with W’eyant leading the offense. York— —Cotner laUant ............ ...... h........... ............ Eppler Hoffman ........ ........1,........... ........ Gardner Cook ................ ........u........... .................. Bell Hersey ............... .......... Haynle Gard ........... .rj ....... ........... Jenklna [.ewis .............. ........r............ ......... Preston Skinner ............ ........r*........... . Chamberlain Muth ................ ........qs.......... ........... Weyant Conklin ............ ...... 1-i ....... .......... Atwood lose .................. ........rh. Sommerhalder Hewitt .............. ...... fi ....... ............ Foweli Substitutions: Y’ork, Adams. Farnam, Moline, Moore, Kllngsmlth, Price. Cotner Fight Results —Gardner. Officials; Referee, Emil Frank. Nebraska; umpire. Dr. E. C. Jones. Grand Island; linesman. Dr. Charles Cox, York. Charles Crocker, Iron Monntaln, .HIrh., declsloned Glen Camp, Kewunee, I.I., (6): Ernie Katii, Sheboygan, defeated Tiger Klause, Panama, and Matty Dablman, Milwaukee, outpointed Casper I.eo, Cudahy, »«). lo»n Bernstein and Chief Webster, both of Milwaukee, draw, <«). Vpeedy Quick, Iron Mountain, knocked out lam-y Harteau, Antlgo, Wls. TKRRK HAITE, Ind.—Billy Rofie, 149, CinclnnattI, declsloned Allen Matthews, 149, SI. I,null, (10). Johnny Hughes, JS9. Clinton, Ind., drew with Johnny Nichols, 194, St. I,ouls. («I. Jackie Parker. ISl, Clinton, declsloned Johnny Dill, 181» Danville, III., (6). THEY’RE BROTHERS, BUT NOT TWINS ST. JOSEPH, Mo.—Lincoln high and St. Joseph Central battled to a scoreless tie here Thursday afternoon in a snowstorm on a field made swampy by recent rains. The tie throws the Nebraska capital aggregation into a tie with Omaoa Tech for the championship of the Missouri Valley high school conference. A victory would have giveu the vi.sitors from Husker land the undisputed championsnip. Good football was impossible and the game turned into a punting duel. However, the visitors threatened twice during the melee, being halted on Central’s 1-foot line in the first quarter and being stopped four yards from the goal line in the final chapter of the dreary contest. Kulper, Williams Shine. With Kulper and Williams taking turns at gaming yardage for Lincoln, the visitors marched goal- ward after the first exchange of punts had given them the ball on Central’s 40-yard line. The Ne- bra.skans continued their march until they came to within a foot of a six pointer, but the local Indians tightened their front wall on the fourth down and the invaders were held. Central punted out of danger. During the entire first half play was in Central’s territory, but the Lincoln eleven failed to threaten again. Central kicked to Lincoln to open the second half and during the entire third period the Indians and Nebraskans ploughed thru the mud in the visitors’ territory. However, shortly after the fourth quarter got under way Lincoln gained considerable ground on numnerous exchanges of punts and again threatened. Baldwin returned a Central punt from the locals 30-yard line to their 19-yard stripe. Kulper and Williams tore off a first down. The visitors then made five mere yards on four attempts, but were short of a score by four yards and again Central booted out of danger and the game ended a few minutes later with the ball in midfield. Ray, center for Lincoln, and Harold Miller and Greene, ends, were powers in the visitors line thru the majority of the game. Kulper and Williams accounted for the majority of Lincoln’s 101 yards gained from scrimmage. Central made only three yards from scrlm- make. The lineup and summary: AMOS ALONZO STAGG. I’nivfrslty of ChlraRo. The Big Ten conference football season for twenty-five years has closed regularly on the Saturday preceding Thanksgiving day, but the faculty committee and athletic director.s voted that in view of the suffering resulting from unemployment the conference universities would extend the season one week long and allow games between its members to be played for charity. The athletic directors arranged schedules In keeping with the action of the faculty conference. The majority of the directors and coaches agreed that the following schedule of games would produce the most income for charity, j namely Northwestern against Purdue at Soldier Field, Chicago. Minnesota again.st Ohio at Minneapolis; and Michigan against Wisconsin at Ann Arbor. It wa.s further voted that a tournament be held between Chicago, Iowa, Illinois and/Indiana on Stagg field on Thanksgiving day, Chicago to play Iowa one half, Illinois to play Indiana one half and the winners to play a second half. A most interesting game will take place between Minnesota and Ohio at Minneapolis. Most people do not know that the University of Minnesota had a leading part in the formation of the Big Ten conference. Professor Conway MacMillan of Minnesota called the original meeting of the faculty representatives in 1896 which meeting resulted in the formation of what i.s called the Western conference, originally consisting of seven members. Iowa and Indiana joined in 1899 and Ohio joined in 1912 creating what is commonly known as the Big Ten conference. Gophers Hold Edge. It is interesting to note that only Iwo football games have been played between Minne.sota and Ohio during this period of nineteen years, Ohio defeating Minnesota 27 to 0, at Columbus in 1921, and Minnesota returning the compliment 9 to 0 at Minneapolis in 1922. This has been due largely to the fact that these two universities are the most remote from one another. The psychology seems a bit in Minnesota’s favor and I rather expect it to win. The game between Northwestern and Purdue at Soldier field should be particularly interesting. Northwestern has been leading all along in the conference and in the minds of most people will go into this game a top heavy favorite. Furthermore, Northwestern to hold its position as champion must not be defeated. This game will be another test of the Notre Dame and the Warner systems as developed at Purdue and Northwestern. Northwestern has the edge. If playing conditions are righL Michigan should win its game with Wisconsin at Ann Arbor. Michigan has an unusually strong defensive team as Indicated by the scarcity of scores made against her. Its running attack also has surprised her competitors. The Notre Dame-Army game in New York holds the spotlight in the east. Coach Anderson and his assistants have developed a remarkably fine scoring and defensive team. The game will be of particular interest to Jesse Harper who has recently returned to Notre Dame as athletic director because back in 1913 when he was athletic director and football coach at Notre Dame he initiated the Notre Dame-Army series by winning 35 to 13. Notre Dame’s team has been magnificently strong again this year and with good playing conditions in my judgment wiU prove its class. Efiliï OmPLE IS ■ S SELECTION ERN END “Catfish” Smith Chosen for Other Wing Post of All Star Team. ZIMMERMAN AT HALF» BY SOL METZGER. One trick in football strategy is to convince an opponent that a certain play is under way and then cross him with another that is decidedly different. Andy Kerr does just this with his Colgate team. Thursday I showed Kerr’s long side reverse run which worked so well against Brown. Here is its companion play; one that starts exactly like the reverse, but instead develops into a drive thru the short side of the line. This play starts with back (2) taking the snap and running to his right as if to give the ball to 4. He spins as 4 passed him and then plunges ahead into the gap between tha defensive right tackle and guard. The fake of 4 to the right helps the play, as it tends to draw over to that side the secondary defense. Thus, back (1) and right end (5) coming across the scrimmage line and downfield are often able to take out the defensive halfbacks, thereby clearing the field for a long run by 2. Saturday St. Mary’s cut back off tackle play. (Copyiixht.) ALL-MH THKRN TEAM. End—DalrjTnpl'. Tnlono. I'orbl«—I’atlon, Stowoni^. Guard—tllrkman. Trnnr*»oo. t rntrr—(irarrj, \ andrrbtlt. Guaril—Hoafldr, Tiilanr. l arktf—l.rjrndrfkrr, t andrrbtlt. End—Hiiilth, Groraln. Unartrrhark—Dan son, Tnlanr, llallbark—MrK\rr, rrnnrssrr. Mallbark-—/.Immrrinan, Tnlanr, Fiillbnrk—t'aln. Alabama. By DAN M’GUGIN. Y andrrbllt I'nivrrsltj E'notball foach. Y .»ndrrbllt I nivrrslty. Copyright, 1931, by NANA, Inc. (Thf Journal and othrr nruspaprra. ) RADO ACGIES sms ENVER u. Victory Over Denver Brings Assignment to Meet Nebraska in a Charity Game. DENVER, Colo. (UP). The Colorado Aggies, as champions of Colorado have been selected to meet the University of Nebraska, champions of the Big Six, in the charity football game here Dec. 5. Choice of the Aggies was made Thursday after they had beaten Denver U, 20 to 0, The Aggies have one postponed game yet to play—with Colorado Teachers. If they win, and It is Y'irtually certain they will, they will have won five games and lost two this season. The Aggies lost to Utah U, champions of the Rocky mountain conference and one of the strongest squads in the country, and to the Utah Aggies. COMMERCIAL CAGE LEAGVE TO OPEN Central— Meier Hall ........ Jackson Boberg ,. Cramer Whitaker , Dietrich . Dannevik Myers Redmon . Pugh —Lincoln Harold Miller ... Shurtleff ............ Bork ............. Ray ..... Weaver ............. Price Green .... Baldwin Kulper Bronn .... Williams rg ........... rt.......... re........... qb ....... Ih.......... ih.......... fb.......... Substitutions: Central, Mason for Meier, Poindexter for Jackson, I.«w)a for Poindexter, Hutchison for Hall, Potter for Mason, Kaelson for Dietrich, Hall for Hutchinson, Mason for Potter, Dietrich for Kaelson. Jackson for Poindexter. Kaelson for Mason. Kames for Whittaker, Hutchinson for Kames. Lincoln: Hawkins for Kulper, Dickinson for Price, Helllg for Weaver, Christian for Bork, Smith for Shurtleff, Schwartz for Bronn, DeJamett for Hawkins. Hunt for Schwartz. Officials: John Wulf, Kansas, referee; Price Hopkins, Colorado Teachers, umpire; Ted Packwood, -Missouri, headllnesman. Lincoln Came Statistics Yards gained from scrimmage Punts .......... .. Average of punts Associattd Press Photo The«« tad« look «nough alik« to b« twins, but they'r« not Edward (♦eft) and Dalbert Dunkin, brother« of Brownwood, Ttx., are co-cap Uin« of the two-mil« Uam at the University of MissourL On the cindtr l^th on« It ju»t about aa good aa th« othor. ‘ ..2 Lin­ Cen­ colntral 1013 . 29 17 40 . 16 26 . 25 27 . 41 . 43 . 1 2 . 4 C . 50 Wrestling Results Graham Supplies the Punch as K-Aggies Vi in TOPEKA.—Ralph Graham, on the sidelines since the West Virginia game, supplied the punch that gave Kansas State a 22 to 0 victory over Washburn. Six thousand watched the two elevens battle here in the mud. After a scoreles.s first half, Graham went into the fray in the third period and scored two touch- down.s in a hurry, which gave the Aggies a 13 to 0 lead, Cronkite recovered a fumble on the Wa.sh- burn 23-yard line, Graham punching thru to a touchdown in five plays. McMillin’s pass to Auker put the Aggies on the 1-yard line and Graham again punched over. A safety and Bushby’s 20-yard plunge netted the other points for the Big Six eleven. Kansas State— —Washburn.. Falrbank ...............le................ Dingman Stephenson .............It Crank Weybrew .................Ig.................... Malang Hasler .....................c.......................... Grout Pilcher ...................rg............... A. Lepper Shaeffer ...................rt........................ Flick Cronkite (c) re................... TUlker Auker .......................qb.................... Barnett Breen .......................Ih........ Edwlnson Do:is ....................rh.................... Emrlch Harsh .......................fb.................... Burger Score by periods; Kansas State ................... 0 0 13 Washburn ........................... 0 0 0 Touchdowns: Graham 2, Bushby. after touchdown: Cronkite. (placeklck.) Graham (line plunge.) Safety: Oliver of Washburn. Officials: Reeves Peters. Wisconsin, referee: Parke Carroll, Kansas City, Mo., umpire; John McLean, Kansas unlversrity, headllnesman; Stuart Dunbar, Satina, field Judge. NEW YORK.—Ray Steele. California, threw Adiole Marehlone, Italy: Renato Gardini, Italy, threw Tommy Droak, Holland;; Joe Mnndt, Colorado, threw Tony Catallao, Italy; Y'anka Zelecnlak, liussia, threw Gene Bruce, Brookly'n; Or. Ralph WIlMm. PhlladelpUa, threw Floyd Marshall. Calllonla. * 9—22 0 — 0 Point Charity Tilt Postponed. BEATRICE.—The charity football game scheduled to be played here Thuri?day between Beatrice high alumni and the Tecumseh American Legion was postponed because of snow. Four Games Listed Tuesday NighCs Opening Round at F. Y. M. C, A. Commercial basketball league opens Tuesday night at the Y. M. C. A. with four games: First National vs. Telephones. Bob's Coffee vs. Gold « Co. YY'eslern State* vs. lowa-.Nebraska. Fairmont vs. Miller A Paine. "IVo quintets have signed up for the City league. They are Law- lors and Elmwood. With seventy-iour quintets already entered in the various leagues sponsored by the Y. M. C, A., this will mark the largest list that has ever played thru the winter season here. Cliff Cunningham stated. Opening round schedules for the Sunday school circuits will appear in Sunday’s sport page. Coney Island Touch to Garden Box Fijihl NEW YORK. (UP). Madison Square Garden has assumed a Coney Island atmosphere with its “barkers” ballyhooing “the world’s biggest exhibition of boxing freaks.’’ But unlike Coney Island, which cut prices during the depression, the Garden has made Its freak show—featuring Camera and Vlc- torio Campolo in a 15-round bout for the world’s dreadnaught championship—a high priced attraction, taking advantage of a charity hook-up and the “championship” billing to scale ringside seats at $15. The federation for the support of Jewish philanthropic societies is the charity sponsor of the bout and will share the profits, if any. Most of the charity will go to the two fighters. The bout is not expected to draw more than $50,000, Camera remains a heavy favorite in the betting, but not by the boxing writers. Kearney Teachers Nose Out Chadron Gridsters KEARNEY. (UP). Kearney Normal humbled Chadron State Teachers college here 'Thursday, 7 to 0, w’nen Fritz, Antelope end, blocked a Chadron punt near the goal line in the final quarter of the game. Hubert fell on the ball for a touchdown. The game was played in six inches of snow. The snow held the players to straight football and neither team was able to get an advantage until near the end of the final period, Chadron tried for two placekicks and Kearney one. All the attempts failed. Starring for Kearney were Merryman, Noyes, Hiibbert, Fritz and Graham. Chadron’s outstanding players were Evans, Rock and CaldwelL NASHVILLE.—T h e All-Southern football eleven for 1931, which appears above, has been made up by tabulating the selections of tha coaches of the Southern conference. Many other brilliant players received votes, but the majority went to those in this lineup. The election of Dalrymple was unanimous He Is a marvelous end, big, fast and resourceful. Smith, also for end. and Hickman, for a guard, received four-fifths of all votes cast. It seems a pity that with so many great players on Southern conference elevens, more men could not have been selected for this honor. Smith was chosen for the All- Southern because he has power and speed, and left his mark in crucial instance.s, on many a field. Leyendecker, for one of the tackles. also is fast and powerful. Patton, the other tackle, was selected by every Southern coach whos(S team had played Sewanee. Hickman Great Guard. Hickman is one of the great defensive guards of all time. He la a powerful, activa player, who weighs 225. Rcaflde. also strong and fast, has been a big factor in the success of 'Tulane. Nearly all the coaches agreed on Gracey for center. He js a player of skill and spirit. Dawson, for quarter, is a great field general. He does ever>'thing a good back should do, McEver and Zimmerman, the halves, are big, powerful men, with tremendous speed and drive. They would make any team that has ever been assembled. Cain, lor full, is regarded by many as the equal of either of Ihes* men. This all-southern eleven would average 192 pounds, It would have speed, power, elusiveness and great punting and passing ability, and it would be unbeatable. As I have said, in selecting thle team we had to pass up many other brilliant men, including the following: Halfi.acks: Feathers, Tenneasee; Kelly, Kentucky, Chalmers. Berger and Poppel- man, i/larvianrt; Thomas. Virginia; Brewer, Duke; Slus««r, North Carolina: Clary and Blount, South Carolina, Roberts, Chandler, .Mott, Downes and Key, Georgia; Barron and Galloway, Georgia Tech; Hitchcock and Hatfield, Alabama; Rogero, Florida; Holly and l»ong, Alabama; Felts and Payne, Tulane; Burke. Mississippi; Almok- ney and Smith, L. S. U. Knds: Haines. Tulane: Rayburn and Derryberry. Tennessee: Smith, Alabajna; Grant, Auburn; Parnell and Hall, Florida. Tackles; Sanders, Tennessee; Godfrey, Alabama; Underwood, North Carolina; Rosu and Hamrick, Georgia; Jenkins, Florida; Decollgny and Upton, Tulans; Fincher. Georgia Tech. Guards: Leathers and Maddox, Georgia; Fysal, North Carolina. Centers: lyidlruques. Tulane; Sharp«, Alabama; Nevlttt, (ieorgla Tech; Fordham, Clemson; Mayer, Tennessee; Torlance, J... 8. U. Falls ('ity Wins from Hiawatha Elpveii 19-0 FALLS CIT Y.—Unleashing a spectacular running and passing attack despite unfavorable weather, Coach “Jug” Brown’s Falls City high gridders routed the pr»- viou.sly undefeated Hiawatha crew 19 to 0 on the slippery Jayhawk gridiron Thursday. Outweighed ten pounds per man, Brown’s youngsters took to the air for their first touchdown. Margrave tossed twenty-two yards to Captain Mosiraan in the opening quarter. Halfback Heiser crashed the line for the last two touchdowns and Bullock converted ono point from placement. The lineup: Falls City— —Hiawatha Ilastle .......................le............... (C) Deroln Graham ...................It.................. M. Moor« Lang ........................le. Greenwald ............. c. Maust ......................rg. Moslman (C) rt. Clark ........................re. Wiar ..........................ob., .......................Ih.,Heiser Margrave ................rh. Bullock ....................fb. Substitutions: Falls Greenwald. Bryson for Lang Clark, Wertz for Heiser, City Poegar Herbert Aller Hutman St rahan Brlghtwell .. Fraley .. Llliote .... Day Griffis for Crook for Wertz for Margrave, (iodflrnon lor Wlar, Crook for Castle. Hiawatha; A. Moore lor Deroin, MacWtlllams for M. Moore, Thomas for Day, Vandever for Herbert, Martinson for Butman, McCoy for Aller. fiotre Dame Favored Over Army Gridders NEW YORK. (UP). Intersectional games between Notre Dame and Army, Dartmouth and Stanford, and a "Big Three” clash between Yale and Princeton will top the Atlantic seaboard footbaj?. program Saturday. -Notre Dame is a strong favorite. Stanford, first Pacific coast team to invade New England, Is little better than an even choice over Dartmouth in the game to be played at Harvard stadium. The expected absence of Captain Alble Booth, has not affected Yale’s wide margin over the once- dangerous Princeton Tigers in the preilictions. Georgetown will entertain Detroit at Washington; Navy will play a “set up” in Wooster and Penn State will meet Lehigh at Philadelphia. Eck Named Captain. FREMONT. (UP). Ferdinand Eck of Bloomfield, guard on the Midland college football team, has been giveu the highest honor which can be conferred by his teammates. He was elected honorary captain of the team

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