Boston Post from Boston, Massachusetts on April 15, 1904 · Page 4
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Boston Post from Boston, Massachusetts · Page 4

Publication:
Location:
Boston, Massachusetts
Issue Date:
Friday, April 15, 1904
Page:
Page 4
Start Free Trial
Cancel

4 BOSTON POST. FRIDAY. APRIL 15. 1004 TIiiM I m thf> <‘on«'n»e iHliotildrr <>rig;liin(rii !•> It. Ilitchril And I« thf DinttniKiilnhlnK Feature of Olir ContM All our $25.00 Suitings, comprising Tweeds, Cheviots and Worsteds, we will make to measure for $ 12.75 Our Mitchell Special Blue Serge with our 2-year guarantee we will make to order during this sale for $ 15.00 200 Ends of Trouserings, to order - $3.50 Mitchell, The Tailor [ Opp. Old South 305 Washington St. 15,000 SEE NEW YORKS DEFEAT COLLINS’ BOYS TOLD IN A NUTSHELL (AMKIIICANA N>w ClPTelHirrl Clilcngo . n. H. K. Atfce. 8 10 n- 13,SOO 2 6 3 n 9 0- 7,000 I 7 4 7 13 0 -.>1,000 2 fi 3 813 1- 6.144 01 GAMES TODAY < A.MKRICA.N. Rofiton nt Now Vnrk. ri)lla<lpl|>hln nt Wflshlngton. AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDING Detroit I’hllndelphin St. BOSTON LOSES OPENING GAME TO PHILADELPHIA TOLD IN A NUTSHELL (.NATIONAL.! Phlladelpliia liostoa .... Cincinnati . Chicago ... New York.. Brooklyn .. H. 12 y E. Attce. 2- 3,179 a 0—13,000 4 0—17,500 3 GAMES TODAY (NATIONAL.) Boston nt Philadelphia. New York at Brooklyn. Plttshiirg at St. Loula. Chicago at Cincinnati. (N.NTIONAL.) PHILADELPHIA, Penn., April 14 —The weakening of Willla in the sixth Inning and the apparent batting streak developed by the home team gave I’hlladelphla the victory over Boston, In the opening of the National league season in thlis city, by the score of 6 to 2 this afternoon. The game it.self was all that could be expected under the climatic conditions, following a miniature snow storm in the morning, all of which made baseball anything but a thing of pleasure for either players or spectators. In spite of this 5179 people turned out to .see the opening game, one of the spectacular features of which was the presentation of a loving cup to the Phillies’ new manager, Hugh Duffy, by his Boston friends. Tie Game Up to Sixth Duffy has, to all appearances, made good In his n(iw cap.aclty, as was shown by the ginger infused Into the game by the Phillies. The score stood one to one up to the sixth, when two singles, between which were sandwiched a two-bagger and a bad wild throw by Delehanty, netted the Phillies three runs. Willis was touched up for two safe hits in each of the seventh and eighth inning.s, one run resiiltlng in each. With the exception of Ten iey’s fumble in the third, which gave the Phillies their first run, and Delehanty’s disastrous wild throw In the sixth, the fielding of the Bostonians was sharp and snappy. Boston's first run was made in the very first inning. Cannell bunted safely out of Wolverton’s reach, but was nailed trying to steal. Tenney singled to right, stole second and came home on Delehanty’s drive to left field. Thi.s ended the session, Cooley striking out, and Abbaticchlo being retired on a short one to Hulswltt. Only four .scattered hits figured between that and the eighth inning, when Delehanty scored after being given tho only free pas.s to first Lssued by Duggle- b.v, who was in excellent shape. Dolehanty’s base on balls, coming, as it did, after Tenney’s strikeout was followed by singles by Cooley and Abba­ ticchlo, and Raymer and Stanley went out on easy flies. The Phillies’ runs were made in the third, sixth, seventh and eighth. With two out and Dooln on first in the third, Tenney let an ugly bounder from Thomas go over his head, scoring Doom. In the sixth Wolverton singled, and W’ont to third on n two-bagger by Titus, both scoring on Delehanty’s wild throw on Barry’s grounder. Another safe hit by Douglass brought home Barry. Good Infield work retired the next three men In order. Thomas scored In the seventh on a drive to right field, followed by Gleason’s hit, which he tried to stretch into a two-bagger, but failed, and Wolverton’s long fly to Cannell. The final run in the eighth was secured by Douglass on HuLswltt’s out, Abba­ ticchlo to Tenney, and Dooln’s timely single to right. Some of the features of the game were; Cooley’s apparently safe drive to left, which looked safe by a couple of feet, and yet was declared foul; the brilliant fielding of Barry and Duggleby, and the fact that Raymer went out on files every time he came to bat, on three of the four occasions to Barry in left field. PHILADELPHIA. AB. R. BH. PO. A. E. Tliomns, e. f., ................. OleaHon, 2b........................ Wolverton, 3b................... 'Titus, r. f............... Barry, 1. f........................ Douglass, lb..................... Hulswltt, s. s................... Dooln, c................................ Duggleby, p...................... Won.Lost. p. c. 01000 0 1000 0 1000 0 1000 I 000 0 1 000 , 0 1 IM)0 1 OOO 31 11 0 0 4 0 1 2 1 2 4 1 11 1 0 4 112 0 0 4 125 0 0 4 1 2 10 0 0 40 12 30 4 13 4 00 4 0 00 4 0 N E In every part of Boston the most popular Ale is Triune Total:-, Cannell, c. f. ... Tenney, lb. Delehanty. 3b. Cooley, 1. f. ... Abbaticchlo. s. s. Rayinor, 2b. Stanley, r. f. .. Moran, c ................. Willis, i>................. •Geler ............ Totals, ............... 33 0 12 27 9 2 BOSTON. AB. II. BH. PO. A. E. . 5 , . 4 , .3 , 4 . 4 . 4 . 3 . 1 30 0 1 4 0 0 1 1111 1 1 20 0 2 0 2 1 00 0 2 1 4 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 00 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 "0 24 13 *8 1. 0 0 3 11 .-0 0 0 0 0 1 0-2 Phllndelphln, 4. Washington .......... (AMERICAN.) NEW YORK, April 14.—Fifteen thousand .shivcriiiK fans saw the Boston world beator.s play mi.serable bitll at American League Park this afternoon, and those 15,000 shivering fans warmed themselves at times by cheering the home team on to Iholr first victory of 1904, the world’s champions going down and out, 8 to 2. It was a runaway victory for New York, .and few of the big crowd present took the result to uiean anything else but th.at New Y^ork outclasses Boston and that the locals will have no trouble in winning the American league pennant. Jimmy Coiilns and every man on his team are the moat disgusted persons in Gotham tonight, and after the game they put up this afternoon It was little wonder they went to cover. Collins had no excuses to make, and would not even blame the weather. Weather Cold and Raw The day \4’as more suitable for football than baseball, and a cold wind blew across the field throughout the game. “It was no fault of the weather,’’ said Collins. “It w.as all our own fault. What happened to the boys. Including myself, I can’t explain. Such is baseball. “Yon can never tell what Is going to happen. I am sorry for tho bad .«tart, but one game won’t be hard to make up. Tomorrow Dineen will probably pitch, and the New Yorkers won’t feel so gay tomorrow night.” No matter how hard they tried, it Is doubtful If the Collins team could play poorer ball than th’v did today. It was the first Bo.ston-Plttsburg game over again. At the drop of the bat the Bostons went 100 feet Into the air, and they never came down. To make matters worse. Chesbro pitched much better ball than did Young, and the New Yorks backed up Chesbro in faultless fashion. Boston Played Poor Ball Think of Cy Young making a wild thro-w to Lachance, w’ho stood less than 30 feet away; think of Collins dropping a high fly and making a wild throw, to first; think of Dougherty and Stahl' letting a fly drop between them, and think of Lachance making two w'retched throws across the diamond. Such misplays as these practically gave New Y'ork a five-run lead in tho opening inning, a lead that Boston never even challenged. Freeman’s home run w-as fairly earned, it being a long drive to right field; hut Parent was able to make the circuit because Fultz took a long chance to come In and get the ball on the fly. Fultz lost, the ball rolled between his legs, and Parent -w’ent around with ease. After the first inning Boston did some fielding and a little hitting and sleeping. In the sixth Collins was on first with one out. Stahl filed to McGuire, and Collins, thinking two were out, -v\-alked down to second, and McGuire shot the ball to first for an easy double play. Lachance the Star Player rhlladelptiia, .............0 0 Boston ........................ 1 0 Earned runs—Boston. 1 Two-base hit—Tllu.s. Sacrlflce hit—.\bbnticchlo. Stolen bases—Tenney, Delehanty, Dooln. Double V>lay—Abbaticchlo and Uuymer. Left on bases —Boston. 0; I’hlladelphla, (1. Bases on bulls— Off Willis, 1 ; off DugRlehy, 1, 8tnick out— By Willis, 2; by DuKgleby, 4. Wild pitch— Duggleby. Time—Ih. 40m. Empire—Moran. Attendance— 6179, CINCINNATI 3, CHICAGO 2 (NATIONAL.) CINCINNATI, O., April 14.—Thirteen thoti- sand enthusiasts saw the opening game l>e- tween the Cincinnati and Chicago teams today. The Cincinnatis won In the ninth Inning. The score: CINCINNATI. AB. U. BH. PO. A. E. Woodruff, 2b........................... 2 1022 0 8cymonr, c. f........................... 4 1 1610 Donila, 1. f. ..........................4 0 10 0 0 Dolan, r. f............................... 4 0 0 2 00 Kelly, lb .................................. 2 11 8 20 Stelnfeldt, 8b........................... 3 0 00 0 0 Corcoran, s. s........................ 4 00 6 60 Peltz. c....................................... 20 0 21 0 Suthoff, p .................................. 3 0 02 2 0 __ __ — Totals.................................. 28 CHICAGO. 3 3 27 13 0 AB. R. EH. PO.A.E. Slagle, c. f ............................. 4 0 0 0 01 Casey. 3b .................................. 3 112 31 Chance, lb............................... .3 1111 0 0 McCarthy, 1. f ........................ 3 00 3 0 1 Tinker, s. s............................. 4 012 21 Jones, r. t ............................. 3 003 0 0 Evers, 2b .................................. 4 0 11 2 0 Kllng. C .................................... 4 02 3 2 0 Weimer, p ............................... 4 0 1 0 3 0 — — Totals .................................. 32 2 7 *25 12 4 **Tftune" means Three in One : Selected Malt, Choicest Hops, Pure Water No Other Ale tastes so mellow. Obtainable wherever Ale is sold. McCormick Brewery Co. Founded 1820 Boston THE BEST IS The Cushing Process Whiskies 50o, 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 Qt. Gins 50c, 75c, $1,00 “ $1.50 Brandies 75c, $1.00, $1.25 " $2.00 “ Imported Wines 75c “ $LOO " California Wines 25c, 40c " 50c " 580 Washington St., Boston, Mass. FREE to tlie Sick—DR. LIVERPOOL TUK INDIAN DOCTOK U permanently located a t 360% T r e m o a t Street. Boston, where he will treat the alck free of charge from & to 10 o’clock every morning. ORDINARY DI~ AOXOSIS, R K ~ markable CURES, All chronic end obscure dlaceses lo- Mted end deecrtbed without esklug uuee- ttone. Office boiira 10 to 4; Soodeye. 10 to t A*e Jifte •One out when winning run scored, Cincinnati ................. 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1—3 Chicago ...................... 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0—2 Earned run—Chicago. Two-base hit—Tinker. Three-base hit—Chance. Sacrlflce hits—Pelts, Stelnfeldt. Stolen bases—W'oodrnff, Casey, Chance. Double play—Seymour and Kelley. Bases on balls—Off Suthoff, 4; off Weimer, 4. Struck out— by Suthoff, 2; by Weimer, 8. Passed ball—Pelts. Time—Ih. 40m. Umpire—Johnstone. Chesbro was almost invincible. Collins cracked out two sharp singles over second base and Freeman’s home run drive went over the embankment and Is still rolling. Parent’s home run under ordinary circumstances w'ould count for only onei base. Dougherty and Crlger each hit for two bases. These six hits were the best Boston could do against Chesebro, and six hits never count for much when they are scattered In as many innings. Tame fielding chance.s marked the game, and the only Boston player to shine was George Lachance, who saved Collins another wild throw by leaping Into the air and getting the ball with one hand on Ganzel’s grounder to Collins for the final New York out. It was a beautiful piece of work, and “Gandy” was given a good hand. New Y^ork’s fielding was also tame. The balls bounded W’ell for the Inflelders, although Fultz and Keeler in the outfield enthused the crowd. Keeler made one fast running catch and Fultz covered lots of ground and judged the Boston batsman to perfection. Prominent New Yorkers Attended A decided change of feeling is noticeable in the attitude of the New York baseball public towards the American league, and that Griffith has a strong aggregation all concede. What Is helping tho Griffith team more than anything else is tho persistent refusal of John T. Brush to allow the Nationals to meet the Amerl^'ans. Outside of the cold weather and Boston’s poor playing today’s opening will long be remembered. The ball park has been vastlv Improved since last season. Everyone that amounts to anything In New York was present. American flags were given to all as souvenirs, and over the grand stand floated the flags of every nation In the world. ... Just before the first ball was pitched the military band struck up the “Star Spangled Banner,” and all stood un- covcrcdi. Former District Attorney Olcott threw out the ball from the stand, and Frank F.'irrell and big Bill Dovery attracted no little attention. Boston Rooters Faded Away Farrell wa.s Jubilant over tho size of the crowd and the article of ball played by New York, and predicted that his team would outdraw tho local Nationals. Over 1(X) Boston rooter.s were scattered through the stand. As tho Collins te.am trotted Into the field the Boston rooters eheered, but after the first Inning not a man from Boston could be found. Despite the cold weather encountered in Buffalo and here, the Collins team Is in perfect shape, and today’s bad start was due solely to a bad attack of stage fright and Chesbro’s pitching. After Dnughtery went out in the first, Conroy to (janzel, Collins hit safely to centre, Stahl fanned and Freeman filed to McGuire. Then came the trouble. Conroy met the first ball pitched for a thne-baso drive to right, Freeman not playing the ball .any too well. P''ultz g.avo Young an easy grounder. With minutes to spare Young to.«sed tho ball 10 feet over Lachance’s head, Conroy scoring and Fultz racing to third. Before Lachance could pick up the ball Fultz bad rounded second, and then to rub It In Lachance threw poorly to Collins. Keeler sent out a fly to left. Dougherty thought Stahl was going to catch it and absurdly allowed the ball to drop safe, Fultz scoring and Keeler going to second. Elberfleld was thrown out nt first by Ferris, and Anderson hit to left for two ba.ses. Williams followed with a single to right. Ferris and Criger Struck Out Ganzel was thrown out at first by Criger and WHllams attempted to reach third, which he did on I..achance’3 second poor throw across. Before Collins could recover the ball Williams scored. McGuire ended the agony by flying to Parrmt. Parent drew a base on balls in the second, but was forced at second by T.a- chance, Elberfeld making a pretty play after the ball, caromed off Conroy’s foot. Fenis and Criger struck out. Chesbro was loudly applauded for the strikeouts, but before the noise subsided It began again, for Chesbro had .sent out a clean home run to right field. The next three men went out in order. In Boston’s third Young, Dougherty and Stahl went out on fly balls, Collins sandwiching In with his ^second single. Elberfeld opened on Young In the third with' a single and Anderson was safe on Collins’ misjudgment of his high fly. Williams sacrificed, Criger to Lachance, Elberfeld dashing for home on tho out, only to be nailed by Lachance’s good throw and Criger’s quick work getting back to the plate. Anderson scored on Gnnzel’s single and McGuire struck out. Collins Caught Napping In the fourth and fifth Boston went out in order. Chesbro again delighted the crowd by opening the fourth with a.two- bagger. He went to third on Conroy’s sacrifice. Fultz went out to Lachance and Keeler hit to Collins, who threw low to Lachance, Keeler getting safe and Chesbro scoring. In Boston’s sixth Dougherty began with a two-base hit. Collins hit to Elberfeld and Dougherty was run down between second and third. Stahl fouled to McGuire, and either Collins or Lachance, who was coaching, or both, were asleep, for Collins walked down to socondjfand McGuire threw to Ganzel for an «asy double pl.ay. In the seventh Freeman began with a homo run, the next three batsmen going out in order. Criger began the eighth with a double, but Young filed to Keeler, Dougherty was out, Chesbro to Ganzel, and Collins filed to Fultz. Young Woke Up Too Late In the ninth Stahl filed to McGuire and Freeman did the same to Fultz. Parent hit to centre for a run home, the ball getting by Fultz, and Lachance ended tho game with an easy out to Ganzel. Young got his bearings In the latter part of the game. In the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth innings Fultz’s single in the seventh was the only New Y'ork man to reach first base. Ban Johnson’s new umpires, Dwyer and Carpenter, had rather an easy time and not a kick was heard. ’I'om Hughes will pitch against his old teammates either Friday or Saturday. Hughes looks in splendid condition and he is confident of wining his game. The score: NEW YORK. The Magnet That Draws QUALITY! That’s the attraction at the United Cigar Stores. Add to quality the feature of perfect uniformity, and these together given to you at a saviug of about one half. This is the result of modern merchandising. It is the reason why we have so quickly become the largest cigar dealers in the world- If increased cigar satisfaction means anything to yon; if a saving of money is an object; if a latitude for choice, or assurance of uniformity is an inducement; then you are sure to be a frequenter of our stores. We want you to try something especially good, just to prove our story. Try it to-day—the Gen. Braddock (LONDRES) 6 for 25c. $2.00 box (50) A delightfully smooth, even smoke. Made by hand, of a combination of rich, well cured tobacco—wrapped with genuine Sumatra. UNITED CISAR STORES IMPORTERS-MAKERS-RETAILERS. THROUGH OUR MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT The«, prices hold good anywhere In the United 8t»te«. Wo prepay express or postage on order, of 100 cigar, or over. Bend cash, check or money order to the Fletlron Building, New York. Mention shade of cigar preferred. and bunching of bits in the fifth Inning. Attendance, 7000. The score; CLEVELAND. AB. U. nil.PO. A.E. Flick, r. f.... ...................... 411 40 0 Bay, 0 . f .......... ...................... 4111 00 Bradley, 3b... 13 0 1 0 Ln.lole, 21).... ...................... 6 1 031 0 Hickman, lb.. ...................... 4 0 1 13 0 0 Lush. 1. f .......... ...................... 210 2 0 0 Turner, ss.... ......................... 4 11 1I 0 Bemts m: ............ BernhaTd, p.. ...................... 4 02 300 ........................ 30 005 0 Totals .......... ........................3.5 "(i 1) 27 87 CHICAGO. AB.R.BH.PO.A.E. Holmes, 1. f. ........................4 1 22 0 0 Dundon, 2b.,, ........................ 40113 0 Green, r. f.., ................ 8 01100 Davis, ss.... ....................... 4 0 0 2 0 0 Donahue, lb.. ........................ 3 00 15 11 Tannehlll, 3b. , ........................ 4 0 2 1 0 1 Jones, c. f.... ........................ 3 0 0 0 00 Sullivan, c... ........................3 0 04 10 Owen, p.......... ........................3 0 11 .5 2 •Callahan ..., ........................ 1 0 000 0 Totals.......... ............. ^7 I 27 10 4 •Batted for Owen In ninth. Cleveland.......... .......... 1 0 00 5 0 0 0 0-0 Chicago ............ ........... 0 0 100 00 0 0 -1 Conroy, 3b. Eiilts, c. f. ... Keeler, r. f. .. Eltierfekl, s. a. Anderuon, 1. t. Williams, 2b. . Ganzel, lb. McGuire, c. Chesbro, p. . Totals ............ AB. R. BH. PO. A. E. I.eft on bases—Chicago, 6 ; Cleveland, 0. Two- base hits—Holmes. Turner, Hickiiiaii. 8acrltl(!e hits-Dundon. Jones, Bay, Bernhard. Stolen base—Bradley. Struck out—By Oweu, 4 ; by Bernhard, 3. Passisi ball—Sullivan. Bases on bnllB-(»ff Owen, 3; off Bernhard, 2. Hit with ball—Bernhard. Time—Ih. 30m. Umpires— O’Loughlin and King. DETROIT 7, ST. LOUIS 2 (AMUUICAN.) ST. LOTTS, April 14.—By superior and timely batting the Detroit team today defeated the St. Louis' Amertcaus lit the opening game of the season by the score of 7 to 2. Mnllln was rather wild, but his seven l)ascs on balls were scattered and the St. Louis team could not bunch their hits. Attendance, 5000. OLD BELFRY BEAT CENTRAL In the My.«tic Valley leagtie last evening Old Belfry won three .straight from Central and Arlington Boat Club took two out of three from Medford. Nlehols of Old Belfry was high roller, with a total of 301. OLD BELFRY—1329. 1. 2. 3. CENTRAL—11 S3. Worthrn.. Nichols. .. Redman. .. Reed ........... Peabody.. 83 t02 HIAshworth., 1 . 80 82 10!) no Qiilmby ----70 78 841 Parks.......... 83 97 93 LUtlelleld.. 87 74 90 Bletz . Totals. ,411 400 43S 8 . 77 89 72 84 07 85 77 74 94 80 73 77 72 82 A. B. C.-LSr-L 1. 2. 3. J. T. Gray. 80 84 Hsipeel... Puffer ____101 97 74'BlHiik., Kowle 08 84 84 H usk .. , M. II. Gray 83 79 75||)rnke. Durgls .... S3 79 OOj .Stone.. Totals. . .488 390 383 MEDFOHD—1230. 1. 2. 3. 83 9,3 103 83 73 82 70 70 93 73 82 83 78 ^3 73 TotaLs , ..417 423 410'| Totals ...391 407 438 SAUSAGE WON THREE Sausage whitewashed Quincy Market on the Carrnth alleys last evening in the Market- men's candle pin series. Snow of Sausage was high roller with a single of 113 and u total of 303. SAUSAGE-1.300. I QUINCY M KET—1230 Hislop . Geoppel Snow ., Kllton . Kinsman 10 27 12 0 32 BOSTON. AB. R. BII. PO. A. E. Dougherty, 1. f. .................... 4 0 1 200 Collins, 3b. .. ...................... 40 20 30 Stahl, c. f. .. ...................... 4 0 00 0 0 Freeman, r. f. ...................... 41 1100 Parent, s. s. . ...................... 3112 1 0 Lachance, lb., .............................. , .40 1322 Ferris, 2b. ... ...................... 3 0 00 4 0 Criger, c ............ ...................... 80 153 0 Young, p. ... ...................... 3 00 1 11 Totals .......... ......................32 ~2 "fi24 14 ~3 New York ... .......... 6 1 1 1 000 0-8 Boston ............ ..........0 0 00 0 0 1 0 1 -2 NEW YORK 7, BROOKLYN 1 (NATIONAL.) NEW YORK, April 14.—The New York and Brix)klya Nationals opened the season In Brooklyn today. It was an easy victory for New York, they playing an errorless game In the tleld, and Mathewsou allowing the Brooklyns only three hits. Devlin playiKl thlnl base In place of Bresnahan, who was Injured In the game with Columbia .vesterday. The score: NEW YOBK. Two-base hits—Chesbro, .\nderson, Keeler, Dougherty, Criger. Three-base hit—Conroy, Home runs—Chesbro, Freeman, Parent. Sacrlflce hits—Couroy, Keeler, Ellierfeld, Williams. Stolen base—Ganzel. First base on errors—New Y'ork, 2. Base on balls—Off Chesbro. Struck out— By Chesbro, 4; by Y’oung, 2. Double plays- Criger and Lachance; McGiilre and Ganzel. Passed ball—Criger. Time—lb. 33in. TTmplres— Dwyer and Carpenter. Attendance—1.5,800. FRED P. O’CONNELL. CLEVELAND 6, CHICAGO 1 (AMERICAN.) CHIC.VGO, April 14.—Considering the cold weather, a good crowd turned out today to witness the opening game of the American league season. Cleveland won the contest by perfect fielding The score : DETROIT. AB. II. BH. PO. A.B. Barrett, c. f .......................... 4 1 3 3 00 Meliityre, 1. f........................ 511 2 00 O'Leary, ss............................. 41 0 2 50 Crawford, r. f...................... 6022 0 0 Gremlnger, 3b ...................... 4 0 ;* 230 Donovan. 11) ........................... 3 000 0 0 Burns, 2b................................ 4 2 15 1 0 Buelow, c ................................. 2 0 25 10 Mullln, p .................................. 3 2 20 4 Ü — ........ -Totals ..................................34 713 27 14 0 ST. LOUIS. AB, B. BH. PO. , A.K. Burkett, 1. f........................... 4 0 22 00 Heidrlek. c. t ........................ 3 0 I100 Hemphill, r. f ...................... 5 0100 0 JoAos, lb.................................. 3 00 12 1 0 Wallace, ss............................. 3 00 I 2* 2 Pudden, 2b.......................... 411330 Gleason, ob............................. 3 0 0 161 Kahoe, c.................................. 4 0 17 3 0 Slever. p................................ 2 I001 0 •Swander................................. 1 00 00 0 .I— __ ... ... Totals ..................................82 262715 8 •Batted for Slever in ninth. Detroit ........................ 2 2 1 1 0 1 00 0 -7 St. Louis..................... 0 10 00 0 10 0—2 1. 2 3.1 1. 2. 3. 79 8.5 8N| Walker .... .‘•'9 98 82 97 88 8!)Hubbard .. 70 8.5 79 08 94 113; Perkins ... 7,5 8,5 hCl 77 88 81! Poindexter.. 79 71 79 90 101 OéiCollyer ___89 88 9.5 447 450 4fi(li Totals----- 408 427 41.5 Earned runs—St. Louis, 1; Detroit, 3. Two- base hits—Gremlngor, Mullln, Pudden. Sacrlflce hits—Buelow (2), Dotiovau, Barrett. Stolen bases—O’Leary, Crawford. Base on balls—Off Mullln, 7: off Slever, 2. Struck out—By Mullln, 4 ; by Slever, 5. Left on bases—St. Louis, 10; Detroit, 6. Time—2h. Umpire—Sheridan. AB. It.BH. PO. A. E. Browne, c. f ................... 5 131 0 0 Devlin, 3b ................................ 4 00 1 30 McOann. lb............................ 5 1 210 0 0 Merles, 1. f............................. 4 11 2 00 H. .McCormick, c. f............ 411 10 0 Dahlen, ss................................ 2 0 0 3 2 0 Gilbert, 2b ............................... 2 102 20 Bowerman, c.......................... 3 225 1 0 Mathew.son, p........................ 4 01 2 0 0 ....— ....... .... - ■ Totals ..................................33 7 BROOKLYN. 10 27 140 AB. R. BH. PO.A. E. Strang, 2b...............................4 11 2 3 0 Sheckard, 1. f ........................3 0 02 0 0 I-uinley, r. f....'.................3 00 11 0 Dobbs, 0 . f ............................. ;{ 0 05 0 Ü BabI), ss................................... 3 0 1 2 0 Doyle, lb................................. 3 0 111 00 M. MeCormlok, 3b............... 2 00 15 2 Jacklltsch, c ........................... 3 0 0 3 11 Jones, p ................................... 3 00 0 3 0 ........ _ •mm Totals ..................................27 1 3 27 15 3 New Y'ork ..................... 2 11 1 0 101 0 -7 Brooklyn ...................... 10 0 00 0 0 0 0 -1 Earned runs—New York, 2. Left on bases— New York, 4; Brooklyn, 1. First base on errors—New Y'ork. 2. Two-base hits—McOann, Strang. Stolen bases—Browne, Dahlen, Mathew- Bon, Doyle. Double plays—Devlin, Gilbert and McGann. Sacrlflce hits—Devlin, Dahlen, Bowerman, Lumley. First base on halls—Off .Mathewson, 2 ; off Jones, 4. Struck out—By Mnthew- son, 4; by Jones, 2. Passed ball-Jacklltsch. Wild pitch—Jones. Time—Ih. 50m. Umpire— Emslle. Attendance—17,500. PHILADELPHIA 8, WASHINGTON 3 (AMERICAN.) WASHINGTON. April 14.—Philadelphia and Washington opened Jhe American league season on the letter's new grounds today, and the visitors won. Plank pitched a steady game throughout for the Philadelphia team. Wilson, who pitched for the locals, was batted freely, and gave a base on balls and hit a batsman with the ba.ses full lu the second Inning. The game was called at the end of the eighth Inning on account of darkness. Attendance, 0144. The score: PHILADELPHIA. Hartsel, 1. f.............. Pickering, c. f......... Davis, lb...................... L. Cross, 3b................. Seybold, r. f................. Murphy, 2b.................. M. Cross, 83................ Powers, ...................... Plank, p.......................... Hoffman, c. f... AB. B. BH. PO. A. B. .. 3 01110 .. 4 0110 0 , ..401 11 2 0 .. 4 1 2 1 0 1 .. 4 3 310 0 .. 3 2 115 0 .. 8 11 2 1 0 .. 4 0 2 3 0 0 .. 4 I113 0 _ ....... '«'GTON, 132412 1 AB.U. BH. PO.A. E. 01 0 5 0 0 2 1 0 0 . . 300 0 0 0 1 0 11 0 0 1 2 5 40 . . 4 0 2 1 10 .. 3 003 00 1I 2 1 0 01 0 2 1 ... ...._.... 3 9 24 13 1 0 500 020 1 -8 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 —3 O’BRIEN KNOCKS SULLIVAN OUT ST. LOTTTS, April 14.-Jack O’Brien of I'hilaficlpliia tonipht knocked out Twin Sullivan of Boston in the third round of wh.at was to have been a 15-round contest. l''’or the first two round.s tho men contented them.selves with light sparring and not a hard blow was struck, thoupli O’Brien had a shade the better of tho light work. In the third Sullivan tried liLs right, but failed to do any damage. O’Brien booked hi.s riglit to the jaw, sending Sullivan to the lloor. A.s lie arose be was .sent down .again. He got up all but out and O’lirien landed another right to the jaw, which put Sullivan out. FINNIGAN WON CHAMPIONSHIP Last evening on the Elite alleys, Finnigan of the Boylaton team, who led the individual average column at the end of the first sc'es in the Xew Century league, met Millin of the Somerset team, the loader In tho second series, in a rolloff for the Individual average prize. Finnlgan defeated his opponent in two straight games, making the third unnecessary. The scores were as follows; Finnlgan 98, 104. Millin 9fi. 90. BURDEN’S HIGH ROLLING William J. Burden bowled six consecutive strings on the Carruth alleys yesterday, with the following result.s: 92. 109, 143, 99, 12t>, 115. This is an average of 114 pins per string. ARMENIAN WRESTLER WILL MEET TURK TOMORROW An effort is being made to revive wrestling In this city, and’the flr.st bout in a series will be held at the Dudley Street Opera House on Saturday evening, between Petro Savor, the “Terrible Turk,” and John Tamouran, a giant Syrian. For months there has been a strong rivalry between the pair, and after several attempts the match was finally made. For the past three weeks the pair have been training hard for the contest, and both are In fine shape for a hard go. The match has caused no little excitement among the Syrians and Greeks of this city, and tickets for it have been sent for from Haverhill, I^awrence, Lynn and Brockton. The event promises to be the best held In this city for many years, and as the followers of the game have had no chance to see the sport since Jack Munroe and Gus Ruhlin wrestled at the Criterion Club some lime ago, it is needless to say that there is a great deal of interest in it. For Other Sports See Page 8 BOXINS GOSSIP Jack .Mooney writes from ChicaRO that he has Just complcTeil the iiiial arraiiiieinenls for the j hiierclty boxiUK touriuiineiit iietweeii (JhlcuKo 1 aiiil Boston Imxers, which will ln> held nt the Battery I) UUih, Chicago, ou April 22. 'J'he full curd Is HS follows: At 11(1 pouiid.s. Rouse O'Brien, Boston, vs. Tonitny Si'iiliy, Chicago; 118 pounds, I'lnkey ICvuns. Boston, vs. Tommy Moore, Cliicago; 122 [Kfund.s. Jack Flamigaii. Boston, vs. Billy Flniil- eiinc, ('hicai-'o: I2d pounds. Kid Goodman, Bos- lon, vs. .Mike .\lcmsi<;, Chicago; 142 pounds, Billy Mcllody. Boston, vs. .Martin Duffy, Chicago. The last-named bout Is for the white weltcr- weiglit championship. 1 The (late of lie* sliow—.April 22—is the same >ts that of the .Milwaukee B. C., which has hilled j Charley Neary vs. .limmy Briggs, .and ('hester i (ioodwln vs. ivld Sayers. That night will be a | big night for Boston boxers lu the West. Jimmy Ganliier Is back In town after his eumpalgn in the West. He will re,st for a fortnight, and then go back to Chicago, looking for big game, .limmy Britt, lie says, has promlwej j to meet Iiim in Chicago In a sl.x-round bout. > Gardner may also meet Charley Neary. nt Chi- i «■ago, tho weight being CiH i.ounds at 3 o’cbxdt. 1 It Is more Ilk<‘ly, however, that If Jimmy wants a chance at Neary he will have to go to Mll- wnukee for It. Neary knows liLs own town, and up to date no Inducements have l)cen good enough to get him to box outside of his own hiilllwlck. Kill Uogers, who claims tho title, “(diaiuplon of the Navy,” wants a chance at Kid I’owell of I’awtiick'et, Young Kelly of Boston, Y'ouiig Joe G’Brieu of Canihridge or Kid Leslie of tbimhrldge. Out of the hunch he ought to bs able to get a mnfch. AVnlier Johnson and Bob Armstrong are matched lo box 12 rounds at Haverhill, April 19. They met some years ago In Boston and fought a 10-round draw. Johnson feels he cun beat big Bob this time. Andy Daly and Kid I’antz will please call between 3 and 4 to<lay. These paragraphs are from a Chicago paper: “Chester Goodwin, the famous Boston featherweight, was at till? ringside In Milwaukee last night, seconding Briggs. He is a slender, dark fellow, of cleaii-cnt face and genllcmanly ways, and certainly looks as though he could flght some.” “Jimmy Briggs is a man of Irou. After the terrible beating Neary handed him he left the ring without a mark.” Tonight comes the Marlboro show, the Highland A. O. A big crowd 1» assured, as almost the entire membership of the club has signified Its intention of being present. Albert Delmont of Medford meets Kid Brady of Buffalo In a 10-round bout, Johnny Burdlek of New Y'ork goes against Jack Woods of Worcester for eight rounds. Emergency Kelly of Boston Iwxes Charley Dlusdale of Worcester for eight rounds, and Jack Ahern of Houth Boston goes against Jim O’Brien of .Marlboro for six rounds. ' Manager .Tohnny Greene of the Warren A. G. > of New Beilford 1 < arranged a double card for .April 19. George .Ashley of Fall Blver and Ed- ' die Cain of Brooklyn will meet In the feature I lK)ut of 12 rounds, and Gny -Ashley and Patsy Sweenev will meet for 12 rounds In the semifinal. tommy O’Neil and Homer Carpenter, Iwth of Fall Blver, meet In the preliminary of eight rounds. Gus Ruhlin, the Akron giant, has signed articles to box Jack .Munroe In June, whether or 1 not the miner beats Jim Jeffries. The battle will probably he fought In ’Frisco. J. P. L.—Fred Sidney and .TImmv Burke boxed at Lawrence, April 8. The decision, by agreement, was a draw, both men being on their feet at the end of 10 rounds. Sidney had much the best of the bout. I.etter here for Ike Wooila. Telegram here for Kid Pantz. Philadelphia ................. Washington................... Earned runs—Washington, 1; Philadelphia, 2. Two-base hits—AATlsoh, Moran, McCormick, Davis. Seybold. .Stolen base—Thoney. Sacrlflce hits—Wilson. Murphy. Double plays—Thoney to Coughlin; Moran, McCormick to Stahl (2); Hartsel to I'owers; Davis to M. Cross. Bases on balls—Off Wilson, 1; off Plank, 4. Hit by pitched ball—Stahl (2), .M. Cross. Struck out —By Wilson, 1 ; by I’lnnk, 2. I.eft on bases— Washington. H ; Philadelphia, 3. Passed ball— Powers. Time—Ih. 55m. Umpire—Conneliy. College and School Games Today williams College at Andover. Ballou & Hoblgand vs. Malden High at Malden. Somerville High vs. Tufts 2d at Somerville. Y’olkmann vs. Stone’s nt Chestnut Hill. Noble & Greenough vs. Thayer Academy at Braintree. Newton High vs. Wellesley High at Newton. Lawrence Commercial College vs. Melrose High at Melrose. Arlington High vs. Cambridge Latin at Arlington. Meifford High vs. Rindge Manual at Cambridge. Natick High vs. Waltham High at Yaltham. THE enterprise ! MEN’S HABERDASHERS 15 SCHOOL ST., BOSTON Our SHOE DEPARTMENT offers for Friday and Saturday several thousand pair of well known $3.50 Men’s Shoes in all styles and all leathers, at $ 2.45 REMEMBER WE GIVE GREEN TRADING STAMPS

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 18,500+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free